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LIBRARY 

UWVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

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Widhina you JfappinedS at Christmas and tor 1954 











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,/UBRARY I 
UNIVEB^TY OF MARYLANill 
1 COLLEGE PARK, Mft j\ 

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EB i R 954 RY publication of the llniverditu o/ Maryland cAlumni 



VOL. XXV NO. I 

50c THE COPY 

$3 THE YEAR 




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R. D. WATSON, President 

CLASS 1917 



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You'll get plenty of ideas ... for Christmas- 
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giving you an opportunity 
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or how well any of the furniture pieces (fash- 
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To spark your Christmas thinking . . . here 
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"Maryland" 



Vol. XXV January I'Yhrunry. 1054 N I 







Publinhed m Monthly nt the University of 
Maryland, and) entered nt the Pott Office, 
College Pork, Md., as teeond olose mall mat 

irr unit, r tin \rt nt Oongreis iii March .".. 
I871i. $3.00 per ninr fifty cent* tin- oopy. 



HARVEY I. MILLER, Managing Editor 

Director of Publications and Publicity 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Md, 



SALLY L. OGDEN, Advertising Director 

Eighteen W. Twenty-fifth St 

Baltimore 1, Md. 

HOpklns 7 i)ni8 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



Officers 

Dr. Albert E. Goldstein '12, President 
Col. O. H. Saunders '10, Vice President 
.T. Homer Remshcrc '18. Vice-President 
David L. Brigham '38, Executive Secretary 



General Alumni Council 

AGRICULTURE — Uee W. Adkins '42. Ahram 

Z. Oottwals '38, J. Homer Remsherg '18. 
ARTS & SCIENCES — William II. Press '28, 

Mnrjorie R. Wharton '41, C. G. Donovan 

'17. 
BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION — 

Norman Sinclair '43, Harrv A. Boswell, Jr. 

'42, Roger L. Odette "52. 
DENTAL — EiiKene L. Pessage, Jr. '40, Albert 

C. Cook '38, William E. Trail '26. 
EDUCATION — R. Louise Sudlow '50, Stewart 

McCaw '35. Florence L. Duke '50. 
ENGINEERING — S. Chester Ward '32, C. V. 

Koons '29. Col. O. H. Saunders '10. 
HOME ECONOMICS — Katharine A. Longrldge 

'29. Carolyn C. Coppinger '30, Hilda Jones 

Nystrom '32. 
LAW — Edwin Harlin '34, G. Kenneth Reibllch 

'29. John G. Prendergast '33. 
MEDICAL — Albert E. Goldstein '12. Thurs- 
ton R. Adams '34, William II. Triplett '11. 
PHARMACY — Prank Block '24, Frank Black 

'04, Benjamin F. Allen '37. 
NURSING — Flora Street '38, Eva Darley '27. 



Alumni Clubs 

BALTIMORE— Wm. H. Triplett, '11 
CARROLL COUNTY— Sherman E. Flanagan, 

Sr. '24. 
CUMBERLAND— Dr. J. Russell Cook '23. 
EASTERN SHORE— Otis Twilly '21. 
"M" CLUB— Albert B. Heagy '30. 
NEW ENGLAND— R. A. B. Cook 05. 
NEW YORK — Miss Sarah E. Morris '24. 
PITTSBURGH — Gordon Kessler '29. 
PRINCE GEORGES' CO.— Eghert Tingley '27. 
RICHMOND— Paul Mullinix '36. 
SCHENECTADY — Mrs. Marie Esher '45. 



Ex-Officio 

Past President — Dr. A. I. Bell '19 
Past President — T. T. Speer '17 
University President — Dr. H. C. Byrd '08 
Executive Secretary — David L. Brigham '38 



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2H2929 



Homecoming, 1953, Attracts 4,000 




HOMECOMING HEAD TABLE 

I. ell tn right: Dean nf Women Adele II. Stamp; President Donald S. Russell, i nviersitv ni South Carolina; President II C Hunt, i nviersity 
of Maryland; Glenn /.. Martin. Aviation Pioneer; Albert /■.'. O-oldstein, u i> . Alumni President; Dr, Harold I. Ootterman, Dean of tin Fa* ■ 
than Marie U. Vomit, College of Home Economies; Hum S. 8. Steinberg, Olenn I. Mmtin Collegt oj Engineering and leronautical 



Dr. R.Sumter Griffith, 1880, 

Dean of Graduates, Among 

Alumni Returning To 

Maryland Campus 

Qif. ^bauld I. QlUfkam 
Executive Secretary Alumni Association 

An estimated 4,000 alumni returned 
on October 31 to participate in a 
luncheon, a mixer, the Homecoming 
dance and the festivites connected with 
the football game at 
JByrd Stadium. They 
were not disappointed 
as Maryland overran 
South Carolina 24-6. 
Dr. R. Sumper Grif- 
fith, class of 1880, 
made the trip from 
Waynesboro, Vir- 

ginia, to headline an 
| unusually fine Home- 
coming celebration. 
Dr. Griffith is the old- 
jest alumnus of the 
I University in point of 
•ears out of school. 

During football 
half-time festivities 
Dr. Griffith and Clif- 
of Cumberland, class 
of 1896, accompanied the Homecoming 
Queen in a convertible ride around the 
track in front of the stands. Fuller, 
the first quarterback for Maryland 
football team, also participated in a 
radio program. 

Dr. Byrd, Speaker 

President H. C. Byrd was the fea- 
tured speaker at the Homecoming 
luncheon. He also was given the honor 
of crowning Miss Lydia Steward, the 
Homecoming Queen. Miss Steward is a 
freshman in the College of Home Eco- 
nomics. She resides in Silver Spring. 

Judge William P. Cole, Jr., chairman 
of the Board of Regents, spoke briefly 




1//-. Hrigham 
ton E. Fuller 



at a luncheon attended by members 
of the Board, Deans of the various 
schools, members of the State Legisla- 
ture, aviation pioneer Glenn L. Martin, 
President Donald Russell, University 
of South Carolina, and some 1200 
alumni and guests. 

The post-game mixer, featuring a 
period of informal reunion and a sup- 
per of ham and fried chicken, attracted 
the attendance of nearly 500. 
Testimonials Announced 

Plans were announced at Homecom- 
ing for two testimonial dinners honor- 
ing Dr. Byrd. The first is presented by 
the Alumni Association on December 9 
at the Lord Baltimore Hotel in Balti- 
more, arranged to honor Dr. Byrd for 
nearly fifty years of association with 
the University and takes place just 
prior to his scheduled retirement as 
President on December 31. The second 
dinner will be held on December 16 in 
the University dining hall by the Board 
of Regents of the University. 



Gamma Phi Beta copped the first 
place trophy for house decorations with 
a brilliantly colored representation of 
"There'll Be a Hot Time in the Old 
Town Tonight." A ten-foot terrapin 
roasting a South Carolina gamecock 
on a spit took the honors. The figures 
stood in front of a back drop of Barnes. 

Lambda Chi Alpha and Phi Kappa 
Sigma tied for first place in the Home- 
coming float parade. 

Student Homecoming Activities 
Lambda Chi presented a showboat 
in keeping with their song, "Waiting 
for The Robert E. Lee." The red and 
white replica of bygone Mississippi 
river days was complete with revolving 
paddle wheels, fuming smoke stacks, 
a boat whistle and southern belles. 

"The Star Spangled Banner" was 
selected by Phi Kap. The shelling of 
Fort McHenry was symbolized by two 
floats representing the fort and a 
British ship. 




VETERAN QUINTET 

Back rote, hit in rights Lewis h bake, '99; OrendlU Lewis, '97. Front rote, left !•• 
rights Clifton E. Fuller, '96; /,'. Sumter Griffith, \l.H . '80; Roland Harrison, '9"i. 



"IVlaryhipd" 




* 



QUEEN FOR A DAY 

Lydia C. Steward. Home Economics Freshman and Tri-Delta. Pledge, is crowned Homecoming 
Queen by President H. C. Byrd. In attendance are Mrs. Charles M. Bo.roUl (Elizabeth Poisal) ; 
A & S Senior, last year's Queen and Escort Joseph C. Maratta, Engineering freshman. 



Both the fort and ship were armed 
with cannons which fired as the floats 
passed around the track. Phi Kap 
Charles Macatee, representing Francis 
Scott Key, sat on the British ship writ- 
ing the National Anthem with one 
hand while supporting the collapsible 
mast with the other. 

Alpha Epsilon Pi and Sigma Alpha 
Mu took second place and honorable 
mention respectively. 

House Decorations 

Kappa Kappa Gamma was awarded 
second place for house decorations, 
with the song "We're Gonna Wash 
That Team Right Outa Our Hair." A 
girl's head covered with suds peered 
over the top of a tub, flanked by 
shampoo boxes. 



Kappa Delta and Alpha Chi Omega 
received honorable mention for their 
decorations. 

Lydia Steward, 18, Silver Spring, 
Tri-Delt pledge, representing Somerset 
hall, was crowned Homecoming queen 
by Dr. H. C. Byrd during the pregame 
festivities. Shirley Mathews, Alpha Chi 
Omega, and Beverlee Freedman, Alpha 
Epsilon Phi, served as the queen's 
attendants. 

Hanulak Named 

Chester Hanulak, Terp half-back 
received the Gate and Key trophy for 
the "Unsung Hero" of the Homecoming 
game from Gate and Key president 
Bernie Gross. Hanulak was selected by 
his teammates. 

Carl Friedler was Homecoming chair- 
man. 



On WMAL 

Robinson Lappin, "Dean" of the Uni- 
versity Dining hall, was Kitty Dierken's 
guest on WBAL-TV, Baltimore along 
with a group of Maryland students in 
a show- highlighting Homecoming. 

A miniature Maryland half-time was 
the theme of the program. The foot- 
ball team w T as represented by co-cap- 
tains Bernie Faloney and Bob "Blub- 
ber" Morgan. Gary Hayman and Ginny 
Dean led several cheers for the team. 
Highstepping majorettes were led by 
Betty Woodward. 

Eight members of the glee club sang 
"Maryland, My Maryland," and other 
college songs, accompanied by Charles 
Haislup at the piano. Queen candidates 
were on hand to complete the Home- 
coming picture. 

This is the third year that such a 
program has been featured. 



Firemen Honor Byrd 

The Maryland State Firemen's as- 
sociation was the first of many organi- 
zations to honor Dr. H. C. Byrd in con- 
nection with his retirement with a 
testimonial dinner at the Southern ho- 
tel, Baltimore. 

The dinner gave recognition to the 
part the University, under the direc- 
tion of Dr. Byrd, has played in the 
fields of fire prevention and training 
programs. 

According to Robert C. Byrus, di- 
rector of the Fire Service Extension, 
the support which Dr. Byrd has given 
is "second to none." 

The program for the dinner, at- 
tracted an attendance of 500, and fea- 
tured an address by Richard E. Vernor, 
chairman of the Board of the National 
Fire Protection association, and the 
presentation of the title of honorary 
president of the Maryland State Fire- 
men's association to Dr. Byrd. 



Youth Centers 

When word got around that the 
Journalism building, known as "G" was 
to be razed to make room for a new 
women's dorm, the North College Park 
Community center, the Clinton Citizens 
association, and the Bladensburg com- 
munity group obtained Presidents 
Byrd's permission to remove sections 
of the building for use as youth cen- 
ters. 

Each group took one wing to re- 
build on lots donated to them in their 
communities for recreation centers, the 
work being done on week ends by vol- 
unteer help. 

In College Park a lot between Kena- 
saw and Iroquois will be the location 
for their youth center. 




"Maryland' 



^esipA, Qa *7a Miami Onanae Baud 

Meet Oklahoma. *7e4p Stall Make AU-Amelic& 

Topple Alabama and Gain Nation's No. 1 Position After Season of 10 Straight Wins 



«M W& 



Terps 298 ; Opponent* 31 


MISSOURI. 20-6 


WASHINGTON & LEE, 52-0 


CLEMSON, 20-0 


GEORGIA, 10-13 


NORTH CAROLINA, 26-0 


MIAMI. 30-0 


SOUTH CAROLINA. 21-6 


GEO. WASHINGTON, 27-6 


MISSISSIPPI, 38-0 


ALABAMA, 21-0 



National Champions 

The Associated Press, United Press 
and International News Service — all 
three — selected Maryland as America's 
No. 1 football team and National 
Champions. 

The only major eleven to go through 
the season with a perfect record, Jim 
Tatum's Terps, nosed out unbeaten but 
once-tied Notre Dame. 

Maryland collected 187 first-place 
votes of a record 376 ballots and 3365 
points on the 10, 9, 8, 7, etc. point 
basis. Notre Dame (8-0-1) received 141 
first place nominations and 3149 points. 
The Irish had been the pre-season 
choice to wind up as No. 1. 

The top ranking gave Jim Tatum's 



club the O'Donnell 
Trophy, emblem of 
the college football 
title. The trophy, 
donated by the 
Natre Dame Mono- 
gram Club in honor 
of the late Rev. 
Hugh O'Donnell, a 
Notre Dame player 
who became presi- 
dent of the univer- 
sity, is awarded an- 
nually. 

In sweeping 10 straight games, 
Maryland piled up 298 points and held 
its opposition to 31, the lowest total 
scored against a major team since 
Penn State yielded 27 in nine games 




Mr. Martin 



in 1947. 

Operating out of the split T, Tatum's 
eleven rated sixth in total offense with 
a 359.5 yardage average per game. On 
defense, the Terps yielded only 193.2 
yards per game. 

AP Ratings 

The AP puii showed Brel place cotes and 
won lost records to parentheses : 

/ i nm Point* 

1. MARYLAND (187) (10-0) 3365 

2. Notre Dame (141) is on 3149 

:;. Michigan State (8) (8-d) -J?:.'-. 

4. Oklahoma ilm (8-1 li 2591 

5. UCLA (1) (8-1) 2007 

6. Ulce (2) (8-2) 1388 

7. Illinois (7-1-1) 1248 

8. Georgia Tech is 2 l> 

!t. Iowa (10) 6-8-1) 576 

in. West Virginia (14> (8-1) 452 

Tin- Second Ten: 11. Tezaa, 375; 12. i 
Tech, 264; 13. Alabama (1). 257; 14. Army, 
226; 15. Wisconsin. 203; 16. Kentucky (8) 
155; IT. Auburn. 119; is. Duke, 102; 19 
Stanford, 41 : 20. Michigan (1) 35. 





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THE HACKENSACK EXPRESS 



RANNY ROUTT WASHINGTON STAB ! 



Hanulak'8 81-Yard Dash — Chet Hanutok, Man/land's fleet halfback, from Ifackensack. ,Y. J., is shown en route to the Terps' flr.H touehd-trn 
in the opening auarter aoainst Alabama after taking a handoff from Quarterback Bernie Falonep (10). Hanulak brushed past Corky Tharp 
Alabama halfback, and was on his way for the play that was shown nationwide on TV as the play of the week, 

"Maryland" • 





.1 



IN 



CONCERT FORMATION | 

Next Stop, "Miami's Orange Bow// 



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AT A FOOTBALL GAME 



MARYLAND 28; TENNESSEE 13 




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■Fhis was the first time that a Mary- 
land team has reached such a lofty 
fcpot in the AP ratings, although the 
Tatumterps were second many times 
in recent years. 

Maryland was rated No. 9 and Notre 
Dame No. 1 in a preseason poll taken 
just before the football wars began in 
September 29, Notre Dame, Michigan 
State and Maryland were 1-2-3. 
Maryland dropped to fourth, with 
Ohio State third, October 5, and bach 
to third October 13 and October 20. 
When Purdue upset Michigan State, 
Maryland moved into second place Oc- 
tober 27, and retained that place 
through the eighth weekly poll No- 
vember 16. 

Oklahoma Next Foe 

Maryland also became the automatic 
choice to represent the South Atlantic 
Conference in the Miami Orange Bowl 
game, there facing the Big Seven's top 
dog, Oklahoma, with a season's record 
like so! — 

Oklahoma Opp. 

21 Notre Dame 2s 

7 Pittsburgh 7 

in Texas 14 

4."> Kansas 

27 Colorado 20 

:{4 Kansas state o 

14 Missouri 7 

47 Iowa State o 

.".(i Nebraska 7 

42 Oklahoma A & M 7 

2S« 90 




ACC COACH OF THE YEAR 

Top coach of the U. 8. National Cham 
ptonahip Football Team. Maryland's head 
coach Jim Tatum «■</.* voted iCO's "Coach of 

the .near" by the 40 man hallot of lliiic sports 

acribea. 



"We're Honored," Says Jim 

The reaction of Head Coach Jim 
Tatum was expressed with "Great! 



reat! We're highly rfatl 
have such an honoi v\ e feel 
people have been ■• > • 
charitable to u and - c ra bappj and 
proud to be honored thl waj Me 
our team hae been ovei rated bul 
nice to have thii honor, which evt 
body st uses to attain bul \\ hich co 
to very few." 

Governor Lands 'latum 

Governor Theodore R. McKeldin, in 

B letter Coach Jim Tatum of the un- 
beaten Mai viand T< I iapin pi ■ 

l!iK Jim as a "magnificent" coach and 
thanked him for "bringing high honoi 

and renown to the State." 

"I need not tell you," wrote II 
Excellency, "how delighted 1 have bt 
since learning that the experts h 
with good, sound judgment, placed 
Maryland's football team in the na- 
tion's "No. 1 spot. 

''There is additional cause for cheer 
. . . that Maryland will represent the 
Atlantic Coast conference in the 
Orange bowl game. 

"The team is indeed a credit to 
our great university and it is bring- 
ing high honor and renown to the 

State. 

"I know, Jim, that you had won- 
(Continued on Pagt 51 i 




THAT TORE IT! 



Washington star Foto 



Here's the play that halted a terrific drive in/ Mississippi and turned tin tldi after which Maryland always had tin Rebels' number. 
Lee Pasley (42) heaves a tony pass Intended for End liai> Adams in7i in tin end tone. \ murks the spot when idams was supposed t<> 
nali tin- oral for a touchdown. 

Alas and a couple of alack a days and gadsooks, Maryland's Hemic Faloney (10) muck right in there, fOOj tlial thing, and it WO* SUKStt 

an the bayous. 

"Ho! Ho! Uncle .hid, slappin' the hall in the Mississippi mud!" 



"Maryland" 




STAFF FOR GERMAN 162, WIESBADEN, GERMANY 

• itrxiti/ of Maryland course in German Civilization taught for Army and Air Force Personnel stationed in Wiesbaden, Germany. 

Front row: Doris Stryck, Diane Dickerson, Lois Flannery, Clara Hlayg, Anne ffartmere. Hazel Yountiman, and Dona Harbison. 

Middle row: William Larkin, Marco Mike, William Wight, Clarence Smith, William ISaily, Kathleen Edwards, Jean Border, Edwin M alone, 
and John Poorbaugh. 

Hear row: Richard Stil-es, Harold Kelly, Charles Craig, William Blaqg, Albert Alsdorf, Roger Groseclose, and Dr. Dieter Cunz, author of the 
accompanying article. 



Midnight Oil From Maryland 

The University's European Program for the Armed Forces 




Professor of Foreign Languages 

you walk through the big Rhein- 
Main military airfield, a few miles 
south of Frankfurt, Germany, and sud- 
denly you see a sign that looks fa- 
miliar and puzzling at the same time: 
"Midnight Oil, University of Mary- 
land." 

While you are 
still wondering why 
the university has 
gone into the gaso- 
line business you 
get a little closer 
and see that it ac- 
tually reads "Oper- 
ation Midnight Oil." 
When you then en- 
ter the hut and dis- 
cover an office with 
many catalogues 
and filing cabinets 
and listen to a pa- 
tient secretary explain over the tele- 
phone to some officer how many of 
his military courses may transpire in- 
to academic credits, you will begin 
to understand: this is one of the sev- 
enty or more educational centers which 
the university runs for the benefit of 
the U. S. Armed Forces personnel 
stationed in Europe and North Africa. 

Like "Success" Stories 
The students who are registered here 
do their military or secretarial duties 
in daytime, take courses on Monday 
and Wednesday, Tuesday and Thurs- 
day from 7 to 10 p.m., and do their 
homework over the weekend, in their 
luncheon hour or after their daily 
courses between 10 and 12 p.m. That's 
where the "Midnight Oil" comes in. 
Didn't many an American success story 
of the last century "From Newspaper 



Dieter Cunz 



Boy to Railroad King," start with that 
famous midnight oil? If a fellow has 
successfully completed the greater 
part of his studies and needs only a 
few more credits to graduate, the Air 
Force will help him to get over the 
last hump. They issue "special tem- 
porary duty orders" to go to College 
Park to complete his studies on the 
campus. That is the moment when a 
selected minority is advanced from 
"Operation Midnight Oil" to "Opera- 
tion Bootstrap." 

Campus Courses 

All the courses taught in these Uni- 
versity of Maryland centers situated 
between Keflavik, Iceland arid Asmara, 
Eritrea are regular campus courses 
under the College of Special and Con- 
tinuation Studies of which Dr. Ray 
Ehrensberger is Dean. You find the 
courses listed in the College Park cata- 
logues. All language courses are 
taught by natives of the respective 
countries, such as Germany, France, 
Greece, etc.; many courses are taught 
by American instructors hired only for 
these overseas extension courses; some 
are taught by members of the perman- 
ent College Park staff. Dr. Augustus 
J. Prahl, with headquarters in Heid- 
elberg, is Director of the English Pro- 
gram. 

My assignment was to teach a course 
in "German Civilization", listed in our 
catalogue as German 161/162. Our 
Foreign Language Department has in- 
stituted these civilization courses in 
all the major languages which we 
teach. Their purpose is to familiarize 
the student with the general back- 
ground and the cultural tradition of 
the country whose language he is 
studying. It is easily understandable 
that such a course would meet with 





Dr. Ehrensberger 



Dr. Prahl 



a particular interest among Army and 
Air Force people stationed in Ger- 
many. Many of them have been there 
for two, three, or more years. They 
have cars and take trips all over the 
country. 

The beautiful German landscape 
needs no interpretation. The German 
wine tastes good without any knowl- 
edge of German history. However, 
when the soldiers go into the old cities, 
when they view historic castles and 
medieval monasteries, the guide tells 
of electors and ecclesiastical principal- 
ities; about Cistercian monks and the 
Salic dynasty; about the Hanseatic 
League and the Teutonic Knights; 
about the Golden Bull and Imperial 
Free Cities; about Duerer, Bach and 
Goethe. At best, the American soldier 
will remember a litle from a college 
course in Humanities, but for most of 
them these explanations of the Ger- 
man guide means little or nothing, even 
if the man rattles them off in fluent 
English. 

Teach In English 
Here we try to come in with our 
course in German Civilization. We 
teach it in English, though we admit 
that we have a particularly warm 
spot in our hearts for those who come 
into this course with a little knowl- 

(Conchided on Page 44) 



B 



"Maryland" 




SCENES FROM INDIA 



.1/ the Holy City <>.f Benares 



Ferry Orossino "' Bihar In Worth India 



A Fulbright In India 

University of Maryland Instructor in Geography 
Writes of Interesting Year Abroad 



litf, jbauid tinman 

During July 1952 — April 1953, I was 
very fortunate in receiving aFul- 
bright Grant to conduct geographic 
field work in the Gangetic Plain of 
India. Ever since World War II, when I 
spent about a year and a half in India, 
I have felt the urge to return in order 
to study this fascinating country more 
thoroughly. 

After escorting my wife to our home 
in Los Angeles and briefly visiting with 
mv parents, I flew to New York City 
where contact was made with a Pan 
American Airlines plane to London. 
Seventeen other Fulbrights, destined 
for India, were on the same flight. In 
London, about five days were devoted 
to making final ship transport arrange- 
ments and in seeing the usual urban 
sights — Picadilly Circus, Parliament, 
British Museum, St. Peter's Cathedral, 
London Tower, The Thames waterfront, 
and the famed London subway. One 
all-day tour to Stratford-on-Avon pro- 
vided some of us with glimpses of the 
delightful countryside west of London. 
London To Liverpool 

From London we proceeded to Liver- 
pool by rail where we boarded the SS 
Caledonia. Our sea route took us 
through the Mediterranean close to the 
shore of North Africa, passing in sight 
of Gibraltar, Bizerta, and Cape Bon. 
After stopping at Port Said, Egypt, we 
entered the Suez Canal where we saw 
ships from every part of the world 
slowly moving in tandem, under their 
own power. Additional overnight stops 
were made at Aden, and later at Ka- 
rachi, Pakistan, after an encounter with 
the vicious impact of the southwest 
monsoon in the Arabian Sea. 

These pauses on our way to India 
were rewarding experiences. In Port 
Said, Fulbrights explored the city at 
night and on the following day, noticed 

"Maryland" 



how attractive the city appeared along 
the water front area. Aden presented 
a rather unique, if not eerie, appear- 
ance from the harbor. Because of its 
volcanic origin, the landscape in the 
vicinity contains numerous angular 
landforms. Appropriately enough, part 
of the commercial area of Aden is lo- 
cated within an extinct volcanic crater 
and is called "Crater City." Several 
Fulbrights accompanied by Indian 
friends, whom we met aboard the 
Caledonia, hired an auto for a forty 
mile ride towards the Arabian border. 
Along the way we visited an archeo- 
logical museum as well as the so-called 
"Queen Sheba Baths" (actually a water 
reservoir). Karachi bore ample evidence 
of the birth pangs of a young country. 
My most vivid impression of this city 
is the obvious rapid expansion which 
is taking place under very unfavorable 
conditions. The problems of refugee re- 
habilitation were glaringly apparent 
after we visited one of the several 
enormous "shanty" settlements in the 
suburbs. 

At Bombay 

We docked at Bombay on the morn- 
ing of July 25th. Most of the day was 
spent in convincing the Indian Customs 
inspectors that we were not trying to 
smuggle in large quantities of gold 
bullion or illegal amounts of film, 
cameras, pens, and an array of other 
items. Five days were spent in Bombay, 
where the Fulbrights attended several 
press conferences at which they were 
photographed for publicity purposes. 
A tour of the city by bus was also 
provided. Each evening Fulbrights were 
extended invitations to dine with Indian 
families selected for them by the U. S. 
Information Services. 

Our next trip was by rail, from 
Bombay to New Delhi, via the north- 
west Deccan, Central States, and Ra- 
jasthan. Along the way a stop was 



made at Agra for two days to enable 
us to sec the Taj Mahal, the Agra Fort, 
and one of India's best preserved Mos- 
lem cultural centers at Fatephur Sikri. 
The latter place consists of an immense 
fortified city built by Akbar in 1696 
A.D. About fifty years after the death 
of Akbar, the city had to be abandoned 
because of the lack of sufficient water 
supplies. It contains numerous impos- 
ing structures, which are skillfully 
carved from red sandstone, and attests 
to the fine craftsmanship which existed 
during that period. Revisiting the Taj 
Mahal after an absence of about seven 
years was a strange experience. I had 
expected it to be relatively uninterest- 
ing since I had seen it before, but to 
my amazement the structure exerted 
a compelling attraction, especially as 
it was viewed in fine sunny weather 
during late afternoon. In fact, so great 
was this attraction that I was deter- 
mined to photograph it in color from 
the elevation of one of the four mina- 
rets — I had done this in black and 
white film in 1945. However, much to 
my chagrin, I learned that entrances 
to the stairways of the minarets had 
been locked. It seems that a number 
of Indian students, who had failed 
exams, decided to leap from the one 
hundred foot towers to their death. 
As a result, the general public was 
barred from them. However, with some 
effort, I obtained permission from 
the Archeological Director to utilize 
the minarets for photographic pur- 
poses. 

In New Delhi 
After ten days of orientation lec- 
tures and becoming acquainted with 
the best eating and entertainment 
places in New Delhi, Fulbrights were 
sent to various educational centers 
throughout India. Accordingly, I de- 
parted for Aligarh University, which is 
located about eighty miles south of 
New Delhi. Aligarh is an old fori city 
currently serving as a district ad- 
ministrative and educational center. 
Conditions of living in Aligarh con- 
trasted sharply with those of New 
Delhi, which is a city with an inter- 
national outlook and with modern con- 
veniences. At the University wo were 
provided with temporary quarters 
which were located in the "Old Boys' 
Lodge", a building set aside for visiting 



alumni and for meetings. Another 
Fulbright, his wife, and I were given 
two large rooms. While it was a com- 
paratively comfortable place, there 
was no water supply, cooking, or toilet 
facilities. Finally we began to receive 
water in a goatskin, and a cook ap- 
peared to prepare our food. These me- 
chanics of living may not sound too 
unusual, but under conditions of high 
temperatures and almost daily rainfall, 
they can be somewhat difficult to bear 
for newcomers. All our drinking water 
had to be boiled. Bathing was accom- 
plished by means of dipping a can into 
a bucket of water and pouring it over 
oneself. It required some time to be 
able to tolerate the food that was 
provided. Insanitary methods of prep- 
aration resulted in bacillary dysentery 
which required four to five days for 
recovery with medicinal aid. 
All our drinking water had to be boiled. 
Bathing was accomplished by means 
of dipping a can into a bucket of water 
and pouring it over oneself. It required 
some time to be able to tolerate the 
food that was provided. Unsanitary 
methods of preparation resulted in 
bacillary dysentery which required 
four to five days for recovery with 
medicinal aid. 

New House 
During this early period more ade- 
quate university housing was under 
preparation. Eventually, about two 
months later, we moved into a house 
designed to accommodate visiting Euro- 
peans and Americans. It was a con- 
verted private brick home with four 
large bedrooms. We were honored by 
the installation of four flush toilets 
and shower heads. We did not realize 
what an honor it was until we learned 
that in all of Aligarh, a city of about 
150,000 inhabitants, there were only 
about six flush toilets and probably 
no showers. Over four months of plan- 
ning and construction were required 
to install these household items which 
we normally expect to find in a house, 
ihis became our permanent residence, 
and gradually furnishings and Indian 
style beds were added to make the 
place quite comfortable. In August, 
another Fulbright, Dr. John Cover of 
the University of Maryland, arrived to 
live with us. Shortly afterwards, a 
German Graduate Exchange Student 
(zoology) also shared a room of the 
house. Earlier, we were fortunate in 
discovering one of the best cooks in 
all of Aligarh, a Moslem refugee, who 
had experience in the preparation of 
western style food. He and his brother, 
who assisted him, became integral parts 
of our household and certainly made 
life much more bearable for all of us. 
Acquires A Jeep 
Before moving into our new quarters, 
I returned to New Delhi to purchase a 
jeep. After considerable searching 
(thirty-five jeeps and cars later), I 
acquired a 1044 military model. Al- 
though a few short trips were taken 
even during a part of the rainy season, 
long distance travel was not possible 
by motor vehicle due to the high water 
conditions of the rivers which had to 
be crossed by ferry. By late Septem- 
ber, the rivers had subsided to a point 

10 



where crossings were possible. So the 
Fulbrights in Aligarh, all three of us — 
one with his wife — loaded up the jeep 
and headed for nainital, a mountain re- 
sort in the sub-Himalayas. At this 
time, the plains of northern India are 
very warm and uncomfortable, but the 
hills to the noi'th are deliciously cool 
and inviting. We spent five delightful 
days at over 6000' elevation. Nainital 
is perhaps the most famous of Indian 
hill stations. A small lake of about one 
mile in diameter occupies most of the 
area. Along the shores and on the 
slopes of the valley are located many 
private homes, a number of hotels, a 
YMCA, government buildings, and sev- 
eral privately operated schools and col- 
leges. People - from all parts of India, 
as well as visiting foreigners, are to 
be seen promenading on the "mall" 
alongside the lake. Sailing, hiking, 
dancing, and shopping are the main 
activities usually undertaken. While 
there, we managed to get up early 
enough to climb a ridge and a peak 
known as "Snowview" and Mt. Cheena 
respectively. From these prominent 
points one is able to view the magni- 
ficient sight of the Greater Himalayas. 
The clicking of camera shutters pre- 
cluded conversing for a while, since 
we were anxious to obtain photographs 
before the clouds obscured the spark- 
ling beauty of Nanda Devi and other 
peaks located in that great range. 
Septic Nightmare 
Life in Aligarh was quite pleasant. 
The city itself is a septic nightmare, 
but much of the University area as 
well as the surrounding countryside is 
charming and on the whole, the people 
are very friendly. On the other hand, 
it is not the best place to accomplish 
much work due to a number of hind- 
rances. High temperatures in summer 
and during the dry period, plus the 
presence of innumerable flies, make 
concentrating a very difficult feat. Then 
too, the University Library and other 
facilities in the city are often not 
available due to frequent holidays. This 




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is quite understandable when one re- 
alizes that a large number of Moslems 
as well as Hindus reside in Aligarh. 
Both groups have many holidays. About 
the time the Hindus finish theirs, the 
Moslems begin to celebrate one. In 
addition, there are a number of na- 
tional holidays to contend with. The 
foreigner in India is apt to become 
exasperated very quickly when faced 
with such conditions. But it is only a 
matter of time before he learns to re- 
lax and live at the much slower, and 
perhaps more sensible pace of Indian 
life. 

Pakistan Origin 
The University of Aligarh was es- 
tablished early in the Nineteenth Cen- 
tury and for many years catered only 
to students of the Moslem faith. It was 
here that the Pakistan movement origi- 
nated. Many of the important political 
figures in Pakistan, including Ali Jim- 
nah, are graduates. After partition, the 
University was opened to all creeds, 
but even at present the students and 
faculty are predominately Moslems. 
Academically it is one of the best uni- 
versities in India, having well-estab- 
lished colleges in nearly all fields, as 
well as a comparatively distinguished 
staff. Its cosmic ray research facilities, 
Education and Zoology Departments 
are among the best in the country. The 
Geography Department, which has one 
of the finest departmental libraries to 
be found anywhere, is generally ac- 
claimed the best in India. 

By early winter most of the rivers 
of the Gangetic Plain had subsided 
sufficiently to warrant attempts to 
cross them by ferry. This was the 
best time to travel, from the stand- 
point of weather and because there 
was a minimum of dust on the roads 
(few roads are paved). Accordingly, 
the jeep was loaded up to the canvas 
top with bedding and miscellaneous 
supplies. Canned food was carried on 
a luggage rack built onto the rear. To- 
gether with a graduate student of 
Aligarh, who acted as interpreter, I 
proceeded on a circuit of the famed 
Gangetic Plain. 

7,000 Miles Covered 
Looking back on my travels of some 
seven thousand miles over the northern 
part of India, I often wonder how that 
tiny vehicle was able to withstand the 
rigorous beating it received in travers- 
ing the roads. No one who has not 
been to India can appreciate how bad 
roads can really be. On many days our 
average speed for a day's run would 
be less than 15 to 20 mph. A large 
number of places that we visited could 
not have been reached by any other 
vehicle than a jeep equipped with four 
wheel drive. 

Due to the character of the drainage 
system of the Gangetic Plain numer- 
ous ferry crossings are required, es- 
pecially if one is travelling from east 
to west. In nearly all cases the ap- 
proach to the ferry involves crossing 
an extensive expanse of sand before 
reaching the water. Ferries usually 
consisted of two river boats lashed 
together, and rough hewn planks gen- 
erally served as a deck and as a run- 

"MarylantT' 



way upon which to drive the vehicle. 
In several instances disaster was bare- 
ly avoided while trying to drive onto 
the deck from the bank of the river. 
Most boats leaked, and oftentimes the 
additional weight of the jeep with its 
load, plus the load of animals and 
people would start new leaks or cause 
old ones to squirt considerable volumes 
of water into the boat, thereby lower- 
ing- its freeboard close to the danger 
point. Never once did a ferry crew 
"bat an eye" at such conditions. There 
are, perhaps, no more nonchalant per- 
sons in India than the operators of 
ferry boats. 

8,000 Feet Up 
A few side trips were made outside 
of the Gangetic Plain (my main study 
area). These places were irresistable, 
especialy when we were only within 
a day's travel by road. The first of 
these was Dehra Dun in the hills of 
northern India. Here we spent two days 
and were fortunate in being escorted 
through a tea plantation and the cart- 
ographic reproduction plant of the 
India Survey Office. Nearby Mussoorie, 
a resort town located in the mountains 
at about 8,000' above sea level, was 
also visited during our stay at Dehra 
Dun. From this height we were able 
to view the spectacular snow covered 
greater Himalayas, more than one 
hundred and fifty miles in the distance. 
Weeks later, when we reached the 
western edge of the Kosi River in 
northern Bihar, we discovered that 
floods had washed out all of the east- 
west roads. Accordingly we changed 
our plans and headed southward across 
the Ganges by railroad ferry, into the 
Chota Nagpur Plateau region of south- 
ern Bihar and Orissa to the delta of 
the Mahanadi River. Enroute we man- 
aged to visit mica, coal, and china clay 
mines and processing plants. While 
in Orissa we traversed the Mahanadi 
Delta to spend an enchanting night 
next to the red sands of the Bay of 




"Orontlaub, don't bother your father. He 
hmi n tough day yesterday following the 
alumni banquet." 



Bengal at Konarak. One of India's 
most unusual group of temples is situ- 
ated at Konarak. On the return trip 
to Aligarh we drove through the in- 
dustrialized middle Damodar Valley to 
Patna, Benares, and Allahabad. 

Throughout my travels in India I 
was impressed by the friendliness of 
the people and the evidence of their 
great cultural heritage. It is true that 
much poverty and backwardness, in 
terms of -Western standards, exist. 
However, despite economic hardships 
most of the population appear to be 
relatively optimistic in their outlook. 
The tourist is very apt to be fooled 
by what he observes in the urban and 
selected cultural centers visited under 
the supervision of a guide. The heart 
of India is still to be found in the 
rural sections where one may meet 
persons who rarely, if ever, have seen 
an automobile or radio, and who are 
blissfully unaware of the changes that 
are taking place in their country. While 
flying home via the Near East and 
Europe, I had many hours in which to 
ponder over the implications of this 
great gap between modern, dynamic 
India and the rural majority. 



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11 



Seventh Centenary of The University of Salamanca 




AT SALAMANCA 



Salamanca, dominated by the Old and New Cathedrals, is 

mirrored in the River lormrs. 



In the Plaza de Colon the statue to Christopher Columbus points 
the uiav Westward. The Torre del Clavero is in the background. 



Note: Mr. Alfred W. Becker, instructor in foreign languages, was designated 
by President H. C. Byrd to represent the University of Maryland at the 700th, 
anniversary of the founding of the University of Salamanca in Spain. The ac- 
count of his visit to the venerable sister university follows. Mr. Becker's chief 
interest was a risit to Alicante to secure first-hand material on Gabriel Miro on 
whose works he is writing his dissertation. The librarian made this visit the subject 
df on article in an Alicante newspaper of September 17, 1953, entitled Alicante en 
Maryland in which he expresses his appreciation of the American visitor and his 
interest in Spanish literature. "Alfred W. Becker goes away carrying Alicante 
in his heart," this scholar says among other things in flowery Spanish style, 
"and we remain knowing that there, in Maryland, a young man will teach, happily, 
the glory of our land and our soul." — A. E. ZUCKER 



fy /Oj/ied W. /iecJem 

Even the railroad right of way from 
Madrid to Salamanca seems de- 
signed to trace a path out of the twen- 
tieth century and back through Span- 
ish history. Departure is from Mad- 
rid's noisy Estacion del Norte by means 
of a thoroughly modern electric train 
which makes its way past the still 
building University City and then 
along a busy four lane highway, also 
being extended, into the Guadarrama 
Mountains. By the time the swarms of 
Sunday excursionists debark at the 
Escorial, a not unusual power failure 
and the more rustic, lonelier roadways 
through the less populous countryside 
have already dimmed the presence of 
the contemporary scene and the sub- 
stitution of a steam engine for the elec- 
tric one within sight of the medieval 
walls of Avila seems to remove yet 
another century which has intervened. 
A bustling and punctual twentieth cen- 
tury arrival in Salamanca would be 
even more incongruous and this, too, 
seems to have been completely avoided 
by careful design. 

Gratifying Climax 
The three hour delay of the train on 
a Sunday afternoon, was thus a grati- 
fying climax of a trip made by way of 
the resting place of the Kings of Spain 
and the fortress city, home of Spain's 
greatest author-saint, to pay tribute 
to the University whose influence con- 
tinues after seven centuries. Some 
ninety delegates from Argentina, Bra- 



zil, Canada, Colombia, Chile, Cuba, the 
Dominican Republic, Ecuador, France, 
Germany, Great Britain, Guatemala, 
Italy, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru, Portu- 
gal, Puerto Rico, Switzerland, United 
States, Uruguay, and Spain had come 
to these Sessions of Hispanic-American 
Language and Literature, the initial 
exercises commemorating the seventh 
centenary of the University of Sala- 
manca. These meetings had been called 
together to reappraise and discuss the 
heritage of a common language and a 
common culture in Spain and Hispanic 
America and to seek new means of 
strengthening the cultural ties be- 
tween the nations on both sides of the 
Atlantic. Since the various commemo- 
rative festivities were not to culmin- 
ate until October with the awarding 
of honorary degrees and attendant 
ceremonies, many of the representa- 
tives had not yet arrived in Spain, 
causing the names of numerous illus- 
trious American universities to be 
missing from the lists. 

Drowsy Terminal 

The delegates were met upon ar- 
rival at Saiamanca's drowsy terminal 
and then transported by bus to their 
quarters in two of the larger student 
dormitories of the university. Facili- 
ties at the Colegio Mayor de Hernan 
Cortes were quite luxurious for a col- 
lege dormitory, since they included the 
services of a chambermaid, private 
bath, and a cozy private bar adjacent 
to the lounge and game room. Our 




AT SALAMANCA 

The statue of Fray Luis df Leon stand* in 
a patio of the University wheri he taught. 



hosts spared no efforts to make us com- 
fortable, while we made efforts to ac- 
climate ourselves to the very Spanish 
custom of having the evening meal at 
eleven p.m. 

Official Welcome 

On the following day the delegates 
were welcomed officially by Dr. Antonio 
Tovar, the Rector of the University, 
and by Alfredo Sanchez-Bella, Direc- 
tor of the Institute of Hispanic 
Culture, and after the responses 
of attending delegates coupled with re- 
grets of those unable to be present, 
commissions were constituted to in- 
vestigate various areas of the theme of 
the conference. The papers of the dele- 
gates were read and discussed in daily 
sessions of five such committees which 
concerned themselves with Colonial 
Letters, Contemporary and Gaucho 
Poetry, the Modernist Movement, For- 
eign Reactions to Hispano-American 
Letters, and Interpretation and Evalua- 



12 



'Maryland' 



tion of these Letters. The business 
activities of the first day were quick- 
ly adjourned for a visit in gToups to 
the Old and New Cathedrals, followed 
in the afternoon by a reception on be- 
half of the University, and in the eve- 
ning by refreshments at the Gun and 
Sport Club. 

Since the five commissions had only 
begun their task of evaluation on Tues- 
day morning, the plenary session of 
that afternoon reported numerous 
papers submitted but had a minimum 
of concrete details available for pre- 
sentation. Voluble and at times impas- 
sioned debate was aroused, however, by 
the suggestion to recommend the pub- 
lication of a library of Classics. The 
afternoon's meeting was preceded by 
a showing of several experiments in 
cinema art and followed by a formal 
reception tendered by the municipal 
council in the striking council hall of 
the Plaza Mayor. 

Literary Homages 

The following day, excepting a brief 
period in the morning devoted to per- 
using delegates' papers in committee, 
was devoted to literary homages of 
several kinds. At midday, the Colombi- 
an poet, Victor Mallarino, offered a 
recital in the historic lecture hall of 
Fray Luis de Leon to an audience in- 
cluding the Ecuadorian ambassador in 
Spain. The remainder of the day was 
devoted to a bus excursion to nearby 
Alba de Tormes, where the delegates 
were guided through the scenes associ- 
ated with the life and enshrinement of 
Santa Teresa. The guide was Dr. 
Rafael Lainez Alcala of the University, 
whose enthusiastic and witty commen- 
taries on the history and art of the 
old city were coupled with evocative 
recitations from the pages of Span- 
ish literature. 

Committee Findings 

When findings of the separate com- 
mittees began to take more definite 
form, the recommendations presented 
to the full session illustrated the de- 
sire for understanding and harmony in 
both directions across the Atlantic. 
One of the most discussed proposals 
was that of Dr. Tovar urging the un- 
dertaking of a comprehensive linguistic 
analysis of the indigenous languages of 
America, supplemented by recordings 
as well as printed publications. It was 
noted that such undertakings have al- 
ready been begun in Mexico and Peru, 
even if not on the grand scale envis- 
aged by Di\ Tovar. Other recommenda- 
tions included the establishment of 
chairs of Spanish Studies in American 

Universities and of American Studies 
in the Spanish institutions, the or- 
ganization of an international Spanish 
Book Club, the designation of a fixed 
date to be celebrated annually as Lan- 
guage Day, and the continued encour- 
agement of the teaching of Latin in 
secondary schools. While the more 
tangible papers produced these immedi- 
ate recommendations, the more subtle 
details of other pieces of research were 
promised at a later date with the pub- 

"Maryland" 



lication of the principal works sub- 
mitted. During the evening, the pro- 
vincial council extended its hospitality 

to the delegates with a reception in the 

historic chambers of the Palacio <l<- la 

Salina. 

Exchange of [deaa 

Proposals laid before the plenary 
session at its final meeting Friday were 

directed primarily to promote the easi- 
er exchange of ideas not only within 
the Spanish speaking community but 
also beyond it. Several specific steps 
were advocated to disseminate classi- 
cal and contemporary translations and 
to ensure the freer circulation of and 
access to all publications. Another 
group of recommendations stressed the 
advisability of fomenting the study of 
comparative literature and suggested 
detailed means for the implementation 
of such a program. In concluding, vig- 
orous applause was occasioned by the 
observation that all the literary efforts 
of the various countries belonged to one 
and the same literature and the pro- 
posal that it be considered as such. 

The delegates relaxed from their de- 
liberations in the evening by making an 
excursion to a neighboring breeding 
ranch of fighting bulls. Here the local 
trainers were joined in testing some 
of the younger animals by several 
members of the Sessions. At least one 
of the latter viewed this topic of re- 
search from all angles, including from 
below, until the local experts prevented 
his subject from getting the better of 
him. 

Generous Hospitality 

The informal expressions of grati- 
tude on behalf of the delegates for 
the generous hospitality of the people 
of Salamanca and by Dr. Tovar for 
the sincere and fruitful labors contrib- 
uted by the delegates were restated 
more formally at the closing ceremonies 
on Saturday morning. After this brief 
final meeting, the delegates once more 
adjourned to enjoy the ultimate of Sala- 
mantine hospitality at a formal dinner, 
where farewells were exchanged, and 
where once again, as the newspapers 
had noted during the entire week of 
festivities, the representatives were of- 
fered a glass of good Spanish wine. 

It was indeed an honor to serve as 
the representative of the University 
of Maryland at the request of Presi- 
dent Byrd and Dr. Zucker and recollec- 
tions of the many pleasant associations 
enjoyed at Salamanca during the past 
summer have been rekindled in the 
preparation of this brief summary of 
the activities. They are only tempered 
by the regret that it was impossible 
to participate in the official ceremonies 
which directly rendered homage to the 
University of Salamanca during Oc- 
tober, 1953. 




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New Dormitories 

While fraternity row nears com- 
pletion, building on three new dormi- 
tories is expected to begin shortly. 

The dormitories, two for men and 
one for women, will have a total capa- 
city of 1,250. They are to be paid 
through $2,350,000 in selfliquidating 
bonds. Site of the new dorms is the 
present location of the Recreation hall, 
which will be torn down. Building GG, 
behind the Rec hall, is in the last stages 
of wrecking. The journalism depart- 
ment evacuated this building. 

Federal Housing authority has 
agreed to provide the money by pur- 
chases of the University's bonds, which 
will be paid on over a 30-year period 
from dormitory rentals of the three 
buildings. 

The Fire Service Extension burned 
two fraternity houses to make room 
to start excavation for the new dormi- 
tories. The cost of demolition would 
have amounted to more than the sal- 
vage that could have been realized. 

They were burned down in the inter- 
ests of scientific research. Objectives: 
To get an accurate indication of the 
rate at which heat is produced in a 
building of known fire potential ; to 
detemine areas of heat concentration; 
the manner and rate at which the fire 
spreads from the point or origin; the 
maximum temperature that may be 
encountered by firemen; to calibrate the 
effect of a controlled amount of water 
applied on a fire of measured intensity; 
to guage the effectiveness of modern 
techniques of applying water in the 
form of a fine spray or fog by an in- 
direct method of attack; to demonstrate 
by example the method of fire attack 
and the effectiveness of water applied 
from different size hose lines with 
various size nozzles; to end up with 
the buildings completely destroyed so 
the excavation contractor can start the 
new dormitory foundations. 



Atomic Energy Exhibit 

The nation's must complete atomic 
energy show went on tour under the 
auspices of the University. This edu- 
cational exhibit was free of charge and 
offered as a service to the public. 

The exhibits will be shown at Col- 
lege Park, Hagerstown, Baltimore and 
in various cities on the Eastern Shore 
under the joint sponsorship of the Uni- 
versity and County Boards of Edu- 
cation. 

The atomic energy show was provid- 
ed by the American Museum of Atomic 
Energy at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, only 
one of its kind in the world, operated 
for the Atomic Energy Commission by 
the Institute of Nuclear Studies. 

The Institute is a non-profit educa- 
tional corporation comprised of 30 
Southern universities. It conducts a 
broad program of research, training 
and education in the nuclear sciences 
through a contract with the AEC. 

National sponsor of the atomic en- 
ergy show is the National University 
Extension Association, comprised of 
state extension services throughout the 
country. 




14 



HISTORIC COURTYARD 

This pen and Ink drawing '»// Glenn <ln*t- 
afson '50, shows the wishing well in u>i 
courtyard o) historic h'osxboroiioh Inn il7!»s). 
the oldest building on tin- College Park <<i»i- 
pus. 

3-Grad Family 

Long established as one of Balti- 
more's largest bakeries, Silber's Bak- 
ery, Inc., will soon occupy a sparkling 
new 20,000 square ft. modern baking 
plant at 7002 Reisterstown Road, Bal- 
timore, built to conform with the high- 
est specifications for sanitary operation 
and incorporating all the most modern 
production methods. 

Baltimoreans first became acquainted 
with the excellence of Silber's baked 
goods when Isaac Silber opened a small 
bake shop in 1907. It was not long 
before the original small venture blos- 
somed into a full-fledged business and 
another store was opened, then an- 
other, until the corporation reached its 
present day status of 12 retail outlets 
with plans for three more. 

Isaac Silber put three sons through 
the University's schools — Dr. Bernard 
Silber, now practicing in Redwood City, 
California, who graduated with the 
Class of 1932 and from the University's 
Medical School in 1936; Dr. Earle Sil- 
ber who graduated from the University 
of Maryland Medical School and who 
is now engaged in research at the Na- 
tional Institute of Health in Bethesda; 
and Sam L. Silber, president of Sil- 
ber's Bakery, who graduated with the 
Class of '34 and who was selected as an 
All-American lacrosse player for his 
distinguished playing with University's 
team. Sam also starred for the Mary- 
land gridiron team. Enlisting with the 
Navy Air Force he served as Com- 
mander of a Naval Air Force Fighting 
Squadron and as Air Group Command- 
er on many of the Navy's leading car- 
riers during World War II, winning a 
number of decorations and medals for 
valorous service to his country. One 
of the University's most active alumni 
members, Mr. Silber is the 1953-54 Pro- 
gram Director of the University of 
Maryland Alumni Club of Baltimore 
and an active member of the "M" Club 
of Baltimore. 

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University Theatre 

The University Theatre presented Its 
first show of the year, "The Male Ani- 
mal," the James Thurbcr-Klliot Nugent 
comedy centered around college home- 
coming. 

The play was produced by Warren L. 
Strausbaugh, Department <>f Speech 

and Dramatic Art. Rudolph E. Pugliese, 

Instructor of Speech, 'was director. 
Ruth Bauman, a member of the Na- 
tional Collegiate Players, was the stu- 
dent director. 

Settings and lighting were by Hern- 
hard R. Works, Speech Instructor, 
Mary Homberger was student stage 
manager. 

Cast in the principal roles were Dave 
Singleton, Clarita Watkins, Gordon 
Becker, Joe Marratta, John Howell, and 
Kate Williams. 

Caroline Hogan senior in arts and 
sciences was student director of "Long 
Voyage Home," University Theatre's 
second production. 

Don Gossage, sophomore in arts and 
sciences, was stage manager for this 
series of four one-act plays bv Eugene 
O'Neill. 

Committee heads included Marcia 
Siena, props; Phyllis Stopp, costumes; 
Mary M. Mueller, make-up; Bobbie 
Scher; house; Elaine Davies, publicity; 
Marcia Oshrine, box office; Ann Ben- 
nett, sound; and Richard Watt, lights. 

Lyle Mayer, speech instructor, direc- 
ted the play. 



Fall Convocation 

"What Business Offers Youth" was 
the topic of Herman W. Steinkrauss, 
National Chairman of Bible Week and 
President of the Bridgeport Brass Co., 
in his address to the University's stu- 
dent body at the annual Fall Convo- 
cation. 

The principal speaker told the as- 
sembly, "Business offers, first, jobs — 
secure, dependable jobs." How far one 
can go depends on ability, plus oppor- 
tunity, plus the intelligence to take 
the opportunity when you see it." 

He said young people put too much 
emphasis on security, and too great 
search for security can kill ambition. 
He explained that the best security 
anyone can have, and the only true 
security, is the security to hold a job, 
and the confidence that you are doing 
well. 

This craving for security, he added 
causes boredom, and that, only growth, 
accomplishment, and recognition lead 
people to happiness in their work. 

Steinkrauss, in talking on the world 
situation said: "Today our powerful 
system, of production stands as one 
of the strongest bulwarks to insure 
the peace of the world. A strong Ameri- 
can industry, is essential to keep us 
prepared for any emergency, and most 
of all to help preserve the peace." 



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-"•-A world once again celebrates 

/\ Christmas in recognition of the 

J 953rd anniversary of the birth 

■ >{ the Most Important Man who ever 

rd this mortal sphere, it is timely 

to observe that a great many people 

go to considerable effort to demonstrate 

that they believe in Santa Claus, while 

too many of them seem to forget who's 

birthday it is. 

Every now and then some self-con- 
fessed modern Wise Man tries to de- 
bunk Christmas, the meaning of the 
holiday, and the story of the Babe of 
Bethlehem, The Light of the World, 
of Whom it was prophesied by Isaiah, 
"His name shall 



1 



be called Won- 
derful, Counsel- 
lor, The Mighty 
God, The Ever- 
lasting Father, 
The Prince of 
Peace." 

There are 
those among us 
who invoke sci- 
ence to prove 
that the four 
excellent e x- 
amples of fac- 
tual reporting 
of the incidents 
surrounding the 
birth of Jesus 
should properly 
be accepted as 
just a beautiful 
story. 

Millions o f 

stained glass 

windows and 

gilded spires 

reaching in 

glory toward the skies the 
world over, stand in silent 
refutation of such conten- 
tions after 1953 years. 

Scientific and historic 
facts? One of the great- 
est living Jewish orthodox 
scholars, Joseph Klausner, 
wrote: 



Christmas is a factual date in his- 
tory, like the Battle of Long Island, 
the Declaration of Independence, with 
Bethlehem and Nazareth as real as 
Baltimore and Hagerstown, just as 
convincing as though the Crucifixion, 
A.I). 29, were as certain as Pearl 
Harbor, December 7, 1941. 

The Gospel is not, like Hamlet or 
Othello, fiction or semi-fiction. 

But let us suppose the story of the 
birth and life of the Gentle Jew of 
Nazareth is fiction, from the account 
of His birth in the manger of Bethle- 
hem until he was cruelly nailed to a 
cross on the Hill of Skulls. 

Test Of 1953 Years 
If it is fiction, who invented it? 
Who possessed sufficient genius, or 
sufficient fraud, to concoct a story that 
has stood the test of time for 1953 
years ? The four accounts of the 
Life of Jesus ring so solidly true that 
Jewish authorities like Dr. Klausner 
go on record as above quoted. 

The life and teachings of Jesus have 
provided an impact upon the whole 
world as no other force has done be- 
fore or since. 

The important feature of the teach- 
ings of the Master is to know that 
He is "the Light of the World" which 
illuminates the way for the world to 
follow. Nations have been founded 
upon and men have died for His ideals. 
Men have reached greatness by prac- 
ticing the ideals set by Him as a stand- 
ard for greatness. 



Observance Of Ideals 

In the broader analysis, it is not 
important that some people believe 
that Jesus literally healed the sick, 
cast out devils, walked upon the waters 
of the deep, and fed a multitude with 
a handful of bread and fishes, while 
others do not believe such claims. 

The importance and benefit to all 
mankind, provided by the life and 
teachings of the Babe of Bethlehem 
lie in following the 
ideals and exam- 
ples set by Him. 
These ideals and ex- 
amples have so 
greatly contributed 
to the advancement 
of civilization and 
incident improve- 
ments in the de- 
cency of human be- 
havior that all athe- 
ists and skeptics 
have benefited there- 
by. 



"If we had ancient 
sources like those in 
the Gospels for the his- 
tory of Alexander the 
Great or Julius Caesar, 
we should not cast a 
single doubt upon their 
authenticity." 




gilded spires reaching in glory toward the skies" 



What of the cynic 
who says, "Relig- 
ious statues, statu- 
ettes, and figurines 
are little short of 
idol worship"? Such 
a critic should ap- 
preciate that the 
four accounts of the 




Birth at Bethlehem were written by 
men who could write when very few 
men knew how to read or write and 
that the picturization was essential in 
order to deliver the message to under- 
privileged persons. Only when His 
teachings provided the cornerstone for 
the doctrine of "help the underprivi- 
leged" and "you ARE your brother's 
keeper", were millions of illiterates 
taught to read and write. (This writer 
recalls that, in relatively recent years, 
he saw a department store in Vladivo- 
stok, its entire front covered with 
pictures of everything from shoes to 
sewing machines. The people could 
read only pictures.) 

They Werj Truly Wise Men 

The star above Bethlehem? "Stars 
just don't happen like that", say the 
cynics. Okay. So it could have been 
an astronomic manifestation akin to 
Halley's Comet and the Wise Men 
from the East were not only Kings 
but astronomers who traveled those 
many miles to see and learn. We're 
told they must have traveled for 
months, posibly years. Well, if so, 
the objective was well worth the 
journey. 

Let's wax "scientific", anent travel 
in Biblical days. Take a look at the 
trip of the Nazarene carpenter, Yosef- 
ben-akob and his pregnant young wife, 
Miryam. Today you can do Nazareth 
to Bethlehem in a few hours by auto. 
In the days of Caesar Augustus, a 
mounted Roman courier could hardly 
have made it in less than three days. 
It must have taken travellers afoot, 
or on camels and donkeys, much longer. 
The trip was an event to be climaxed 
by a greater event. That is why no 
less than four great historians wrote 
about it so brilliantly! 

The flight into Egypt to escape 
Herod must have been an even longer 
and far more arduous trip. 

"Even the December 25th date is 
wrong", say the Christmas skeptics, 
for whom Santa Claus should bring 
a few books. Even George Washing- 
ton's birthday, February 22, is wrong. 
However, people have not yet started 
to doubt Valley Forge or Yorktown. 
Calendars change. Possibly there were 
none at all in Jesus' time. Centuries 
later the date of Christmas was fixed 
to concur with the winter solstice. 



10 



"Maryland' 



"Jesus was a Jew, the son of an 
unmarried Jewish mother", say the 
skeptics. How did they learn that? 
It can best be learned from the four 
accounts in the scriptures, pointing 
out that for His rendezvous with the 
cross, Jesus, just as he had done all 
of His life, made the trip to the 
Temple of Jerusalem to observe the 
Holy Days of his religion. Apparently 
there was but one Temple — the one 
in Jerusalem — and only the most de- 
vout made the long, long journey to 
the Temple. We find the scriptures 
deem it an event of importance to 
chronicle that, at the tender age of 
twelve, the Boy Jesus was so well 
versed in the scriptures that the priests 
"marveled at his knowledge", which 
was so great that even "His parents 
knew him not". 

Poor And Humble 

Always, throughout the story of the 
Prince of Peace, there is the same 
obscure setting, the poor and humble 
featured in spite of the splendors of 
the Roman court and of the temple. 
All of this a prologue to the most 
stupendous drama in the whole history 
of mankind. 

Why is it important to anyone to 
try to prove that all of this was not 
real? What is the harm in being 
baptized or confirmed ? Wherein lies 
the menace? 

Is a pew in a church an opiate to 
assuage the conscience of some hypo- 
crite? No! The man in the pew 
knows, because the Light of the World 
taught him to know. No one fools 
his conscience. It ticks like a clock. 

Jesus and His teachings do not agree 
to submit to laboratory tests and the 
orderly proof of science that has rocks 
telling us whence they came and how 
long they've been here; how fast light 
travels through space and how a photo- 
graph of the inside of a bumble bee 
looks when projected in color on a 
3-D screen. 

All of the "sciences" and the "facts" 
pale into insignificance in the face of 
the birthday of Him who did not just 
drop in to pay a call, but to set an 
example and provide ideals intended 
to show us how to save ourselves. 

Perfect Example 

All religions are good. The teach- 
ings of religions are good. Of great 
importance is the observance of the 
teachings; observance which benefits all 
men of all religions. At Christmas 
time we honor the birth of Him who 
taught such lessons as, "Let him 
among you who is without sin cast 
the first stone", "Love thy neighbor 
as thyself", "Suffer little children to 
come unto Me"; "Therefore all things 
whatsoever ye would that men should 
do to you, do ye even so to them". 
"These three I give unto you — faith, 
hope and charity", "Judge not, lest ye 
be judged". These are just a few quo- 
tations. Is there anything wrong with 
such teachings in ANYONE'S book? 
What a world this would be if all of 
its people abided by just these few 
quotations! 

What the world needs today is not 



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religious unity but rather a unity of 
religious people, because the ideal of 
the brotherhood of man roots down in- 
to the teachings of Jesus which, in 
turn, inspired the concept of democ- 
racy in Government, ennobled home 
life, and emphasized the sacredness of 
human personality. 

As men and nations slaughtered each 
other, time and time again, the key 
to peace was available at all times in 
the Holy Bible. 

The pity of it is that through the 
1953 years of the lessons taught by 
Him, there have been — and are — 
many, many times when the Light of 
the World again and again looked 
down from the cross to say, "Father, 
forgive them for they know not what 
they do". 

His "Day" For The Ages 

That was His great day. For that day 
on the cross he lived! His martyr- 
dom served to project and preserve 
His teachings and His ideals as a 
guide for all toward a better life. 

"Merry" Christmas? There are many 
ways in which we poor mortals can 
make "merry." 

Santa Claus? The name is a deriva- 
tive of "Sankt Nickolaus," who was in- 
spired to deliver gifts by the teachings 
of Jesus of Nazareth. Santa, at Christ- 
mas time, is a nice little old guy who 
is just another creature inspired by 
the Bethlehem story. 

Why not a "Happy" Christmas, 
happy in the realization that we have 
available to us daily the teachings and 
the ideals provided by the Babe in the 
manger, the Light of the World, the 
Prince of Peace. That constitutes the 
world's greatest Christmas present, a 
gift useful for 365 days a year for as 
many years it is given to us to live 
upon the earth. 




J8 



Last Reception 

At his last faculty reception as Presi- 
dent of thedent of the University, Dr. 
Byrd was host to 950 faculty members 
and their spouses at the armory. 

Dr. Byrd's resignation becomes ef- 
fective January 1. He will then be- 
come "President Emeritus." 

There were no speeches made, and 
entertainment was by Mel Huyett and 
his orchestra, who played background 
music. Dress was informal. 

"Maryland" 



NEWS FROM 



ALUMNI CLUBS 



The Alumni Club of Baltimore held 
its second meeting of the 1953-54 
season at the Sheraton-Belvedere Hotel 
in November, when the Board of Re- 
gents; Dr. H. C. Byrd, President of 
the University; and the Deans of the 
Baltimore Schools were guests of the 
Club. 

Judge William P. Cole, Jr., Chairman 
of the Board of Regents, assured the 
Baltimore Club that a Student Union 
Building in Baltimore could and would 
be accomplished. The Board of Re- 
gents, whose membership includes 
Judge William P. Cole, Jr., Chairman; 
Dr. Louis L. Kaplan, Secretary; Harry 
H. Nuttle, Treasurer; D. Herbert 
Brown; Edmund S. Burke; Edward P. 
Holtner; Dr. E. Paul Knotts; Arthur 
O. Lovejoy; Charles P. McCormick; 
C. Ewing i'uttle; and Mrs. John L. 
Whitehurst, was well represented at 
this meeting and each talked on the 
functions of the Board. 




JUDGE WM. P. COLE, JR. 

Chairman of the University of Maryland 
Board of Regents, Judge Cole, after a life- 
time of service on the bench, in Judge of the 
U. >V. Court of Customs and Patent Appeals, 
Washington, I). V. 

■Judge. Cole in an alumnus of the University 
of Maryland; College Park '10; School of 
Law '13. 



Dr. Byrd confirmed Judge Cole's 
remarks on the Student Union Build- 
ing and urged the Alumni Club to take 
necessary steps along with the Deans 
of the Schools in starting this move- 
ment. He said that the Board of Re- 
gents had acted upon the Student 
Union Building favorably in 1951 and 
that now it is up to the Deans, the 
students and the Alumni to make 
necessary application for the progress 
of this building and urged that it be 
a self liquidating building — with resi- 



dence for students, a restaurant, a book 
store, etc., thus making it self-sustain- 
ing. 

Col. William Triplett, President of 

the Baltimore Club, presided at this 
session which was very well attended 
by Alumni and friends of the Univer- 
sity. 

Sam Silber, ('34), Chairman of the 
Program Committee was responsible 
for this session. It was the first time 
since the club's founding in 1949 that 
the organization has had the privilege 
of meeting with the Board of Regents. 
He was assisted by Gretchen Van 
Slyke Welsh, Dr. Irvin P. Klemkowski, 

A. J. Ogrinz, Jr., Dr. Frank Slama, 
John R. Mitchell, Sally Ogden and 
Beatrice Jarrett. 

Meet In January 

A joint meeting of the Alumni Club 
of Baltimore and the Alumni Club 
groups throughout the State of Mary- 
land will be held on January 15th, at 
the Sheraton-Belvedere Hotel at 6:00 
P.M. Elaborate plans are under way 
for a Dinner-Dance and joint session 
when club plans and objectives will be 
discussed. 

Dr. H. C. Byrd will be the honored 
guest. Also to receive acclaim is "Jim" 
Tatum, Director of Athletics of the 
University and Head Coach of the 
"Terrific Terps" — the 
Nation's No. 1 football 
team of the '53 season. 
Rounding out the tri- 
umverante, will be Dr. 

B. Olive Cole who re- 
tired in November af- 
ter serving many years 
as Professor of Eco- ■ 
nomics and Business I 
Administration and 
Secretary to the Facul- 
ty of the School of 
Pharmacy. Dr. Cole has 
the title of Professor Emeritus be- 
stowed upon her. 

Guest speakers will be Dr. John C. 
Krantz, Jr., Professor of Pharmacolo- 
gy, School of Medicine, who will pro- 
pose a long term project for the Bal- 
timore professional schools, and Judge 
William P. Cole, Jr., Chairman of the 
Board of Regents. 

Among the distinguished guests will 
be Anne Holland, WBAL-TV's Assist- 
ant Director of Public Affairs and Ed- 
ucation, Producer of the weekly TV 
medical show — "Live and Help Live". 

This is the first time that the Balti- 
more Club has played host to its sister 
clubs and a record attendance is antici- 
pated. Out-of-town alumni are urged 
to attend this session and to make 
their reservations immediately through 
Al Ogrinz, 3200 Parkside Drive, Balti- 
more. 

Dr. William H. Triplett, President 
of the local alumni group, promises 
a full evening of business and enter- 
tainment. Assisting Dr. Triplett is Sam 
L. Silber, Program Chairman, and his 
Committee. 

The evening will be rounded out by 
dancing and renewing of campus ac- 
quaintances. 




Miss Cole 



The FIRST Federal 
presents 




o- 



Your 1954 



CHRISTMAS CLUB 

Win a it's ii good thought dont 
delay. 

You can have your 1954 Chrietmat 

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School of 



Nursing 

Barbara Ardis 



Dean Gipe's Book 

Dean Florence Meda Gipe, Univer- 
sity of Maryland School of Nurs- 
ing, has made a detailed study of nurs- 
ing in this State. Her as yet unpub- 
lished book, "The Development of Nurs- 
ing in Maryland," gives an interesting 
picture of the progress of nursing in 
the state. 

When the Maryland Historical So- 
ciety opened its exhibit in November 
it included the progress of medicine 
in Maryland during the past 300 years. 

It told the story of the development 
of nursing in Maryland from the land- 
ing of the Calverts to the present day. 

Nurses all over the State dusted off 
old archives, delved in storage rooms 
and libraries for records, and produced 
old pictures and photographs to en- 
hance the display. 

Four Divisions 

The exhibit was divided into four 
periods: 

1. The beginning of nursing through 
the teachings of Father White, who 
landed with the Maryland colonists in 
1634. 

2. The period of the public hos- 
pitals or almshouses. 

3. The era of nursing by the re- 
ligious sects. 

4. The founding of organized nurse 
training in 1889. 

When the Baltimore Infirmary (later 
the University of Maryland) was 
opened in 1823, Sister Joanna Smith 
was the Superior of the Sisters of 
Charity, who took over nursing at 
the new hospital. 

Thus the Sisters of Charity were the 
first members of a religious order to 
be trained as nurses in Maryland, and 
likewise were the first, so far as is 
known, to be active in hospital work in 
the United States. 

The Sisters of Charity continued to 
carry on their nursing activities at 
the University of Maryland for more 
than 50 years. Then they were re- 
placed by the Sisters of Mercy, who 
later functioned at what is now Mercy 
Hospital. 

In 1889 the University of Maryland 
School was opened with Louisa Par- 
sons as Superintendent. 

Other Hospitals 

Other Maryland hospitals opened 
schools at the rate of one a year, until 
the passing in 1904 of the Nurse Prac- 
tice Act, introduced through the State 
Nurses Association to protect the pub- 
lic and maintain high nursing stand- 
ards. 

The year 1935 saw a general up- 
grading in nursing school curricula and 
in educational standards. Today, nurses' 
training has come into its own as a 
higher education movement where stu- 
dents receive training qualifying them 
for State registration and to receive 
their baccalaureate degrees. 



Personal Notes 

Dr. and Mrs. Wm. H. Ferguson have 
moved to 2001 N. W. Flagler Terrace, 
Miami, Florida. Mrs. Ferguson was 
Betty Ann Gillard, Class of 1951. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Goetter 
and daughter, Linda Sue, moved to 
Orlando, Florida, the middle of June, 
1953. Mrs. Goetter was Forest Dale 
Malcom, Class of 1945. 

Mrs. David L. Venezky, Class 1951, 
has a position in a private physician's 
office in Washington and likes it very 
much. Mrs. Venezky was Evelyn Gaver. 

Mrs. William Gladman, Class 1951, 
has a position at Prince George's Hos- 
pital, Chevy Chase, Maryland. Mrs. 
Gladman was Joanne Clark. 
At South Bend 

Mrs. Eloise K. Smith, Class 1944, 
has been working this past year in 
Psychiatry at St. Vincent's hospital 
just outside of St. Louis and is on 
several special committees doing 
psychiatric work, which she says she 
really likes. She is also keeping house 
and taking care of her two small 
daughters. 

Mrs. Pauline Z'eller, Class 1951, has 
a position as supervisor in the Delivery 
Room at South Baltimore General Hos- 
pital, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Mrs. Phyllis King Pettit, Class of 
1948, has an industrial position with 
the Rustless Iron and Steel Corpo- 
ration in Baltimore, Maryland. Mrs. 
Pettit started work on March 1, 1953. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd C. Windsor, and 
son Jeffrey, are living in their new 
home on Sunset Knoll, Pasadena, Mary- 
land. Mrs. Windsor was Jeanne Rose 
Snyder, Class 1950. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Barwick Gentry, Class 
1918, has an industrial nursing position 
with the Eitel-M-McCullough, Inc. 
Company, in San Carlos, California, 
and she writes, "As to my work, I 
feel very fortunate; for the past five 
years I have been doing Industrial 
Nursing, and I would like to add, under 
ideal conditions. This is a young com- 
pany, ninteen years old, and they be- 
lieve in a medical program for their 
employees. As a result, I have a free 
hand in most anything I think is to 
our advantage, which makes work easy. 
I have one assistant in the daytime, 
one swing nurse, and one on grave- 
yard. We manufacture radio and TV 
transmission tubes. This is the home 
office and we have a place in Salt 
Lake City. We employ about a thou- 
sand here. My nurses are as enthusias- 
tic about the work as 1 am, so wc all 
work well together. We are proud of a 
preventive medicine program and not 
just a first aid station." 
In California 

Mr. and Mrs. Luther Gentry moved 
into a new home at 2694 Thornhill 
Road, San Carlos, California, on Sep- 
tember 1, 1953. 

Lt. Col. and Mrs. James B. Nuttall, 
and their two children, Barbara and 
Richard, are stationed in England. They 
left the U. S. A. the first of June 1953. 
Mrs. Nuttall was Virginia Belle Rich- 
ardson, Class 1939. 



20 



"Maryland" 



Miss June E. Geiser, Class 1947, is 
studying at Columbia University for 
her Master's Degree. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Purcell, have 
moved from Havre de Grace, Md., to 
412 Front Street, Weymouth 88, Mas- 
sachusetts. Mrs. Purcell graduated in 
1952. 

Mrs. Harry S. Davis, has a position 
in a Dr.'s office, in Easton Maryland. 
Mrs. Davis was Barbara Ann Riecks, 
Class' 1962. 

Miss Virginia L. Murdoch, Class '32, 
was forced to give up her position as 
X-ray technican, after having done that 
type of work since 1937, on account of 
arthritis. She has a position as office 
secretary while attempting to complete 
her degree at George Washington Uni- 
versity, Washington, D. C. 
In West Virginia 

Dr. and Mrs. James H. Walker, and 
son, Skip, moved to No. 1 Grandview 
Drive, Charleston 2, West Virginia, on 
October 1st, 1953. Mrs. Walker was 
Dorothy Shaff, Class 1939. Dr. Walker 
is a chest surgeon. 

Verna Zang, Class 1953, is doing 
duty at the Anne Arundel General Hos- 
pital, in Annapolis, Md. Susan Hilda 
Wood, Class 1953, is doing general duty 
in the medical ward at the same 
hospital. 

Mrs. Helen Teeple Fassitt, Class 
1923, returned from a visit to Cali- 
fornia the first of Oct., and says while 
there she had a wonderful visit with 
her former classmate, Miss Velma Kish. 
Miss Kish has bought a new home, 5914 
Whitworth Drive, Los Angeles 19, 
California, and the girls had a wonder- 
ful time renewing old acquaintance. 
Mrs. Fassitt says, Miss Kish is doing 
outstanding piece of teaching at the 
California Luther Hospital, and is rec- 
ognized throughout Southern California 
as a most capable, conscientious and 
beloved nurse. It was grand to see her. 
In Philadelphia 

Dr. and Mrs. E. Burl Randolph, and 
three children are living in Philadel- 
phia, while Dr. Randolph is on active 
duty in the U. S. Navy. He was called 
back in the service in Sept. 1952. They 
expect to be back in their home in 
Clarksburg some time in the spring 
(1954). 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Webb, and 
four year old daughter, Mary Beth, 
moved to Church Hill, Maryland, in 
Sept. 1952. Mr. Webb is principal in 
a high school near Chestertown. And 
Mrs. Webb does some part time nurs- 
ing one or two days a week in the 
Chestertown General Hospital. She 
says, "We enjoy living down here and 
would be flattered if any one we know 
would stop to see us." Mrs. Webb was 
Cora Virginia Storey, Class 1944. 

Martha Mallon, Class 1913, and sis- 
ter have moved to 2336 Edmondson 
Ave., Balto. 23, Md. 



LUTHER BURBANK: 

"It is well for people who think to 
change their minds occasionally in or- 
der to keep them clean. For those who 
do not think, it is best at least to re- 
arrange their prejudices once in a 
while." 

"Maryland? 



ItltH.II I SI IKS ON llll 
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the value of five minutes." 
So said Napoleon, reflecting 
on the fate of a nation. 

In business, as in battle, 
time is valuable. And time 
can be saved by using 
BALTIMORE Business Forms. 

The form shown here re- 
placed two forms where the 
billing ran five to fen days after 
materials had been delivered. 
With the BALTIMORE form, 
the salesman completes the 
order and invoice — plus all 
working and accounting copies 
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customer is billed the same 
day the materials ore de- 
livered, and typing of in- 
voices has been eliminated. 

This is an example of how 
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TALBOT T SPEER (Class of 1917), 

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School of 



School of 



Law 




Mr. Miles 



;:^^^^^^ G. Kenneth Reiblich '29 
Heads Big Leaguers 

Clarence W. Miles, chairman of the 
Board of the Baltimore American 
League Orioles (the former St. Louis 
Browns franchise), is a graduate of the 
University of Mary- 
land's School o f 
Law. He was born 
in Cambridge, Mary- 
land in 1897. After 
his admission to the 
bar in 1920, he prac- 

4--*r HV ticed law in Salis- 
bury with his broth- 
er, Hooper S. Miles, 
now State Treas- 
urer. 

Mr. Miles came to 
Baltimore in 1925 
and was People's 
Counsel before the Public Service Com- 
mission. Since then, he has been on 
numerous State and city commissions, 
including the Traffic Survey Commis- 
sion, the Smoke Control Advisory 
Board, and the Bond Commission. Last 
spring he was once more named to 
head a State group charged with study 
of the judiciary. 

In his private practice, Mr. Miles, 
who is president of the Maryland State 
Bar Association, has won an enviable 
reputation as a corporation lawyer, and 
has proved himself a formidable court- 
room antagonist. 

Served In Army 

During World War II, he served as 
a colonel in the Army's legal depart- 
ment, seeing service in the Mediterran- 
ean and North Africa. 

Amply endowed with the Eastern 
Shoreman's natural taste for politics, 
Mr. Miles has had a finger in the 
Democratic political pie for many years 
and during the 1930's headed the 
party's campaign advisory committee. 

The role of sports figure is a com- 
pletely new one to Mr. Miles, although 
his name is important in political, legal 
and civic circles. 

He has followed baseball since his 
boyhood on the Eastern Shore and 
played it for a while in prep school. 
Since that time, however, he has been 
simply a spectator. 




Dentistry 

Dr. Jos. C. Biddix 
Gardner P. H. Foley 




Dr. Lunch 



Elmer, I'd like to have ;/'<« meet IIiJIii 
Crunch, one of the best tackles in our alumni 
association. 



Daniel Lynch '25, President 

Dr. Daniel Francis Lynch, of the 
Class of 1925, was chosen at the 
annual meeting of the American Dental 
Association, held in Cleveland in Sep- 
tember, to head the Association for the 
period of 1954-1955. Dr. Lynch will 
become the ninth graduate of the 
B.C.D.S. to preside over the affairs 
of the national dental organization. 
His fine record of accomplishment and 
his remarkably versatile participation 
in the activities of the profession made 
him a formidable and logical candi- 
date for election to the highest honor 
within the realm of denistry. 

Eight other grad- 
uates of the dental 
schools of Baltimore 
have been elected to 
the presidency o f 
the American Den- 
tal and of the Na- 
tional Dental As- 
sociation, as the na- 
tional organization 
w a s called from 
1897 to 1921: Wil- 
liam H. Morgan 
(B.C.D.S. '48), 1870; 
Frederick H. Reh- 
winkel (B.C.D.S. '55), 1877; Luther D. 
Shepard (B.C.D.S. '61), 1879; William 
W. Walker (B.C.D.S. '84), 1891; Har- 
vey J. Burkhart (B.C.D.S. '90), 1898; B. 
Hollv Smith (B.C.D.S. '81), 1899; Vines 
E. Turner (B.C.D.S. '58), 1908; and J. 
Ben Robinson (U. of Md. '14), 1942. 
The alumni of the oldest dental college 
proudly acknowledge the great honor 
that Dr. Lynch has conferred upon 
their school by his well merited elec- 
tion. 

From Connecticut 

Dr. Lynch was born in Waterbury, 
Connecticut, on June 16, 1902. Upon 
graduation from Crosby High School 
in his native city he entered the School 
of Denistry, University of Maryland. 
During his undergraduate career he 
was Class Historian for three years, 
Class Secretary in his senior year, 
Business Manager of the combined Glee 
and Musical Clubs in his junior and 
senior years, Associate of the Terra 
Mariae in his senior year, and a mem- 
ber of Psi Omega. During summer 
vacations he was a topnotch salesman 
for the Pictorial Review magazine. 

Desiring to prepare himself for spe- 
cialization the recently graduted Dr. 
Lynch interned at the Fifth Avenue 
Hospital in New York City. He spent 
the next two years at the Mayo Clinic 
ill Rochester, Minnesota, supplement- 
ing his work by courses at the Univer- 
sity of Minnesota. After completing 
his preparation for specialization he be- 
g;an the practice of oral surgery in 
Washington, D. C, where he has been 



"Maryland" 



situated for the past twenty-five years. 
Realizing the obligation of a profes- 
sional man to contribute to the train- 
of young men aspiring to become mem- 
bers of a profession, Dr. Lynch has 
manifested a consistently strong and 
active interest in teaching. Most of his 
work in this held has been done in the 
several schools of Georgetown Univer- 
sity: Professor of Anesthesia, School 
of Denistry, 1928-1936; Associate Pro- 
fessor of Ural Surgery, School of Den- 
tistry, 1928-1936; Instructor in Ural 
Surgery, School of Medicine, 1928-1936; 
Lecturer in Anesthesia, School of Ural 
Hygiene, 1928-1935. He has also been 
associated with the George Washington 
University Medical School, as a Spe- 
cial Lecturer, 1938-1940; the University 
of Pennsylvania Graduate School of 
Medicine, as Visiting Lecturer in Ural 
Surgery, 1946; the Army Medical Cen- 
ter, as Lecturer in Ural Surgery, 1948- 
1950; and the Naval Dental School, as 
Lecturer in Ural Surgery, 1946. 

Essayist 

Because of his wide knowledge and 
experience in his special field Dr. Lynch 
has appeared as an essayist and as a 
clinician before dental societies in this 
country and in foreign countries. He 
has given seventy-eight lectures and 
clinics to specialty societies, postgrad- 
uate groups, and component and con- 
stituent societies in the United States. 
He has presented clinics at a number 
of annual meetings of the American 
Dental Association of Europe: Stock- 
holm, 1938; Lausanne, 1939; and Lon- 
don, 1948 and 1952. In 1941 he ad- 
dressed the National Dental Societies 
of Uruguay, Argentina, Chile, Peru 
and Mexico. His extensive bibliogra- 
phy includes papers and reports on a 
wide variety of dental and medical 
subjects, most of them pertaining to 
areas related to oral surgery. 

Gained Experience 

In his progress to the attainment of 
the Presidency of the American Dental 
Association, Dr. Lynch achieved ex- 
cellent administrative experience by 
fulfilling the responsibilities of a var- 
ied series of offices and appointments: 
President, District of Columbia Dental 
Veterans' Society (1946-1948); Secre- 
tary, Research Commission, American 
Dental Association (1937-1947); Chair- 
man, International Relations Commit- 
tee, American Dental Association 
(1940-1947); Trustee, Fourth District, 
American Dental Association (1947- 
1953); President, Pan American Odon- 
tological Society (1940-1942); and 
Vice-President, Federation Dentaire 
International, 1947. He represented 
the United States Government at the 
Ninth International Dental Congress 
(Vienna, 1936) and the American Dent- 
al Association at the Tenth Congress 
(Boston, 1947) and the Eleventh Con- 
gress (London, 1952). A leader for 
many years in affairs of Psi Gmega 
fraternity he was on the Supreme 
Council (1948-1951) and was Supreme 
Grand Master (1949-1950). 

"Maryland" 



SINCE 




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Dr. Lynch has rendered a fine service 
to his country and to dentistry by 
functioning in important relations with 
agencies of the Federal Government: 
Consultant in Dentistry to the Coordi- 
nator of Inter-American Affairs 
(1941); Member, Armed Services Medi- 
cal Advisory Committee to the Secre- 
tary of Defense (1949-1951); Member, 
Reserve Consultants Board to the Sur- 
geon General, U.S. Navy (1948). As 
a Commander in the Dental Corps, 
U.S.N.R., he was on active duty, 1944- 
1946. 

Consultant 

At present Dr. Lynch is a Consultant 
to six health service units: Army Medi- 
cal Center, Walter Reed Hospital, 
Washington; Naval Dental School, 
Bethesda, Maryland; U.S. Air Force, 
Boiling Field, Washington; Veterans 
Administration: Mt. Alto Hospital and 
Washington Regional Office; U.S. Pub- 
lic Health Service: Clinical Research 
Center, Bethesda, Maryland; and St. 
Elizabeth's Hospital, Washington. 

His other professional memberships 
include the American Society of Oral 
Surgeons, Pan American Medical So- 
ciety, District of Columbia Medical 
Society, New England Dental Society, 
American Academy of Oral Pathology, 
Federation Dentaire Internationale, 
Federation Odontologica Latino Ameri- 
cano, International Association of 
Dental Research and Omicron Kappa 
Upsilon. He also is a member of the 
Cosmos Club, the University Club and 
the Rotary Club. 

Honorary Memberships 

The honorary memberships held by 
Dr. Lynch reflect the wide sphere of 
his professional affiliations. They rep- 
resent the high regard in which he is 
held in his own country and in many 
countries abroad. They include the 
Academia de Estomatologia del Peru, 
Sociedad Odontologica de Chile, Socie- 
dad Odontologica de Bolivia, Associa- 
cion Mexicana de Ortodoncia, Colegio 
de Cirujanos Dentista de Costa Rica, 
Associacion Odontologica Argentina, 
Sociedad Odontologica Cubana, Socie- 
dad Odontologica de Costa Rica, Fed- 
eracion Dental Nacional Mexicana, So- 
ciedad Dental de El Salvador, Sociedad 
de Stomatologica del Colombia, Asso- 
ciacion Dental Boliviana, American 
Dr. Myron S. Aisenberg '22, Acting 
Dental Society of Europe, American 
Dental Society of the Argentine Re- 
public, Swedish Dental Society, Nor- 
wegian Dental Association, North Car- 
olina State Dental Association, and 
Arkansas State Dental Association. He 
is a Fellow of the New York Acdemy 
of Dentistry, the American College of 
Dentists, the International College of 
Dentists, and (in Dental Surgery) the 
Royal College of Surgeons. 

Since his graduation Dan has been 
a most loyal alumnus, ever ready to 
respond generously to any demands 
made upon him by the Alumni Asso- 
ciation, the School, or student organi- 
zations. His personal characteristics, 
his professional standing, his admin- 
istrative experience and- his wide 



24 



knowledge of dental affairs are assur- 
ing factors that our distinguished 
brother alumnus will be highly suc- 
cessful in his term of office as Presi- 
dent of the American Dental Associa- 
tion during the year 1954-1955. 

Breakfast At Cleveland 

Fifty-six alumni attended the third 
in the annual series of breakfasts ar- 
ranged by the National Alumni Asso- 
ciation and held in conjunction with 
the meetings of the American Dental 
Association. Like the previous af- 
fairs in Washington and St. Louis, the 
Cleveland event was enjoyed greatly 
and gave the graduates a fine oppor- 
tunity to renew old acquaintances and 
make new friendships. The highlight 
of the occasion was the introduction of 
Dr. Myron S. Aisenberg '22, Acting 
dean, who spoke to the group. A 
striking feature of the meeting was the 
introduction of four alumni who are 
now serving as Deans of Schools of 
Dentistry: J. Ben Robinson '14, retired 
Dean of the B. C. D. S. and now Dean 
of the West Virginia University Dental 
School; Frank J. Houghton '17, Dean 
of the Loyola University Dental School; 
Harry B. McCarthy '23, Dean of the 
Baylor University Dental School; and 
Dr.. Aisenberg. The names, the Classes 
and locations of all who attended the 
breakfast are given below 7 : 

1907— R. H. Mills, Washington, D. C. 

1908— L. G. Coble, Greensboro, N. C. 

1909— C. J. Caraballo, Tampa, Fla. 

1913— Elbert C. Carpenter, Maple- 
wood, N. J.; Edward Freischlag, Cleve- 
land, Ohio; J. E. John, Roanoke, Va. 

1914 — J. Ben Robinson, Morgantown, 
W. Va. 

1915 — J. H. Ferguson, Baltimore. 

1917 — Morris Cramer, Baltimore; 
Frank J. Houghton, New Orleans, La. 

1919— Arthur I. Bell, Baltimore. 

1922— M. S. Aisenberg, Baltimore. 

1923— J. Russell Cook, Cumberland, 
Md.; Harry B. McCarthy, Dallas, Texas. 

1924— N. T. Chimacoff, Newark, N. J. 

1925— B. A. Dickson, Marion, N. C. 

1926— Roy H. Bridger, Silver Spring, 
Md.; Harry Levin, Baltimore; James 
E. Pyott, Baltimore. 

1927 — James Holdstock, Tampa, Fla.; 
A. T. Jennette, Washington, N. C; 
Albin W. Rauch, South Orange N.J. 

1929— Fred Harold, New Haven, 
Conn.; Kyrle W. Preis, Baltimore. 

1930— Norman P. Chanaud, Centre- 
ville, Md.; J. F. Maguire, Wilmington, 
Del. 

1931— Ernest B. Nuttall, Baltimore. 

1932 — Jesse J. Englander, Bridge- 
port, Conn.; L. F. Milliken, Annapolis, 
Md. 

1933— Albert C. Cook, Cumberland, 
Md.; E. T. Leary, Wilmington, Del.; 
Charles E. McGarry, Essex, Md. 

1934 — Ernesto Davila Diaz, San 
Juan, P. R. 

1936— Eugene J. Dionne, Fall River, 
Mass.; M. R. Evans, Chapel Hill, N. C; 
H. B. McCauley, Towson, Md. 

"Maryland" 



1939 — Naomi A. Dunn, New Britain, 
Conn.; Irving W. Eichenbaum, New 
Britain, Conn.; Max Miller, Los An- 
geles, Calif. 

1940 — B. A. Dabrowski, Baltimore; 
Gene Pessagno, Baltimore. 

1942— J. M. Tighe, Baltimore. 

1943— Robert H. Bernert, Hartford, 
Conn.; Fred S. Blake, Paterson, N. J.; 
Robert J. Bruckner, Cleveland, Ohio; 
Joseph P. Cappuccio, Baltimore. 

1946 — Henry S. Zaytoun, Rocky 
Mount, N. C. 

1948— Theresa Edwards, Beckley, W. 
Va.; E. Henry Hinrichs, Jr., Baltimore. 

1950 — Francis L. Edwards, Beckley, 
W. Va.; Clem Hahn, Hazard, Ky.; 
Ralph M. Rymer, Parkersburg W. Va.; 
L. E. Williams, New Holland, Pa. 

1951— M. M. Bartlett, Baltimore; 
John T. Gorman, Cumberland, Md. 

1952— Alvin P. Friend, Oakland, Md. 



JAMES CARROLL 

I M.D.1B91 AND LL D. 1907 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
MAJOR and SURGEON US. ARMY 

BORN IN WOOI Wlfir. h KG JUNE 6. 1854 
DIED IN WASHINGTON. DO Sfc.PT. 16, 1.90? 

AS AMFMF1ER OF THB ARMY COMMISSION VJH\CV 
RUCCEFDFD IN DEMONSTRATING* THI-: MOPK Ot 
CONVEYANCE OF VK.Lf.OW FEVER. HE BKCAME 
AN EMINENT CONTRIBUTOR TO KCIENCB BY HIS 
INVESTIGATIONS. AND A HEROIC BENEFACTOR OF 
HIS COUNTRY AND OF MANKIND BY VOLUNTARY 
SUBMISSION TO THE BITE OF AN INFECTED 
MOSQUITO. WHKHEHY HE /SUFFERED FROM A 
SEVERE AITACK OF YELLOW FEVEH. PRODUCED 
FOR THE FIRST TIME BY EXPERIMENT. .. 

CREATFR.LOVE HATH NO MAN 
THAN THIS. THAT A MAN LAY 
ROWN HIS LIFE FOR HIS FRIENDS, 

ERECTED HY THE REtiEMTS OF 
1 TIME VMVHH8ITY OF MARVLANP. 



DR. CARROLL MEMORIAL 

This is the Carroll Memorial Tablet at the 
University of Maryland. 

One of the most distinguished alumni of 
the University of Maryland's School of Medi- 
cine, Dr. James Carroll, was recently honored 
at the dedication ceremonies of Camp Lezear, 
Quemados dc Marianao, Cuba, famed experi- 
mental site of Dr. Walter Reed and his 
crusade against yellow fever. 

Dr. Carroll, a graduate of The University 
of Maryland School of Medicine in 1891, was 
a member of the medical staff directed by Dr. 
Reed in 1900 to ascertain the cause of the 
dreaded tropical disease. Dr. Carroll is known 
to have willingly subjected himself to infec- 
tion in an attempt to prove thg mosquito to 
be the carrier of yellow fever. 



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26 



School of 



Pharmacy 

i B. Olive Cole 




Dr. Rlncl- 



Doctor Frank Black 

Doctor Frank L. Black was born in 
the City of Baltimore, September 
7, 1882, and has resided here all his 
life. He was educated in the public 
schools of Baltimore and graduated 
from the Maryland College of Pharm- 
acy (now a part of the University of 
Maryland) in 1904 with the degree of 
Phar. D. His only job has been with 
the firm of Hynson, 
Westcott & Dunn- 
ing, Inc. He entered 
their employ on May 
28, 1898 as a gen- 
eral utility boy. By 
close application and 
study he graduated 
and became a reg- 
istered pharmacist. 
Through the sever- 
al years his position 
with the firm be- 
came better estab- 
lished and for more 
than thirty-five years he was general 
manager of the Retail Department. His 
entire life has been devoted to the up- 
lifting of the profession of pharmacy, 
particularly the professional side. 

Many Positions 

Through his own ambition and the 
close friendships with the pharmacists 
of our city and state, he has occupied 
many of the high positions in the vari- 
ous pharmaceutical associations, name- 

ly: 

The Maryland Pharmaceutical As- 
sociation 

The Baltimore Retail Druggists As- 
sociation 

Baltimore Branch, American Phar- 
maceutical Association 

Alumni Association of the University 
of Maryland, School of Pharmacy (in 
which he took a major part in its re- 
organization in 1926) 

The Kelly Memorial Building Fund 

Drug Exchange of Baltimore 

Alumni Club of Baltimore, Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 

The duties of these offices at times 
became quite burdensome, but his deep 
seated interest in the profession helped 
to tide him over many rough spots. 

He married Miss Alice E. Richter 
some years ago. 

In 1948, when he had completed his 
fiftieth year with the firm of Hynson, 
Westcott & Dunning, Inc. he was tend- 
ered an elaborate dinner and was 
presented with the diamond emblem 
of the firm, along with other valuable 
presents. 

The Retail Store of Hynson, Westcott 
& Dunning, Inc. has been discontinued, 
and Dr. Black fears that there will be 
one sad note at its final ending, and 
that will be in severing some of the 
many attachments which will be only 
a memory in the future. However, he 



will be associated with Hynson, West- 
cott & Dunning, Inc. but in a somewhat 
different capacity. 

Major Robert H. Klotzman 

Major Robert Klotzman, '33, School 
of Pharmacy, came up from the rank 
of Private in the Army. Here's the 
record : 

March 1936 — Enlisted in the Army as 
a Private at Walter Reed General Hos- 
pital, Washington, D. C. While there 
had various jobs and finally was ap- 
pointed as an instructor in the School 
of Pharmacy at the Army Medical Cen- 
ter. While on that job helped to write 
the technical manual for the Pharmacy 
Technician, used in part to this day 
by service pharmacy technicians. 

February 1941 — Transferred to the 
Medical Detachment at the U. S. Mili- 
tary Academy at West Point, where he 
served as First Sergeant. 

September 1941 — Went on active 
duty as a 2nd Lt. Medical Administra- 
tion Corps at Paterson Field, Ohio. 

November 1941 — Transferred to the 
Panama Canal Department. While 
there served as Medical Assistant to 
the Surgeon of the Sixth Air Force 
service Command, and the Medical As- 
sistant to the Surgeon of the Sixth 
Air Force. 

To Georgia 

February 1945 — Returning to the 
States, went to duty at Cochran Field, 
Georgia as the Post Adjutant and as 
such assisted in the closing of this 
Base in March, 1946. 

March 1946— Transferred to McClel- 
lan Field California. 

May 1946 — Transferred to Boiling 
Field, D. C. for duty as the Pharmacist. 

December 1947 — Placea on duty with 
the Navy to receive training in Radio- 
logical Safety and was then sent as an 
observer on the Atomic Bomb Tests 
at Einiwetok in the Spring of 1948. 

July 1948— Transferred to Head- 
quarters, Air Rescue Service. Duty — 
Acting Surgeon of this headquarters. 
This was the first time that a non- 
physician had ever been placed on such 
a duty at this level (equivalent to a 
numbered Air Force level) in the Air 
Force. As such was responsible for 
the medical service rendered by the 
Air Rescue Service — world-wide. 

May 1951 — Transferred to Great 
Falls A. F. Base, Montana. Duty — 
Hospital Administrator. 

Current Rank — Major, U. S. Air 
Force Reserve, Air Force Specialty 
Code Classification— Medical Staff Offi- 
cer. 

While on duty at the Army Medical 
Center, re-entered University of Mary- 
land in September 1939. Graduated in 
June 1940 with B.S. in Pharmacy. 

Medicine in Maryland: 1634-1953 

The Maryland Historical Society 
opened an exhibition on the History 
of Medicine in Maryland: 1634-1953, 
on Monday, November 16, 1953, with 
Dr. Thomas Parran, former Surgeon 
General of the United States Public 
Health Service as the principal speaker 
at the opening exercises. 

"Maryland" 



The pharmacists of Maryland pre- 
pared an exhibit of articles and pub- 
lications pertaining to pharmacy. The 
members of the Pharmacy committee 
were Noel E. Foss, Ph.D., Chairman, 
Landon W. Burbage, Ph.G. and Harry 
L. Schroder, Phar.D. The articles 
and publications were loaned by John 
P. Hancock & Sons, Inc., Harry L. 
Schrader, Muth Brothers and Com- 
pany, the H. B. Gilpin Company and 
the School of Pharmacy. 
In 1841* 
Those from the School of Pharmacy 
included the Journal and Transactions, 
and the Act of Incorporation in 1841 
of the Maryland College of Pharmacy; 
the matriculation ticket of one of the 
founders of Sharp & Dohme — Alpheus 
P. Sharp, in the Maryland College of 
Pharmacy, dated October 20, 1841, and 
a graduate evaporating dish owned and 
used by Dr. Sharp about 1845; a copy 
of the first United States Pharmaco- 
poeia (1820); and a record of the first 
annual meeting of the Maryland Col- 
lege of Pharmacy. 

Other articles of historical interest, 
loaned by the above mentioned par- 
ticipants, include Black Sulpheret of 
Mercury, recognized in the first United 
States Pharmacopoeia (1820); Red 
Mercuric Sulphide, recognized in the 
United States Dispensatory of 1839; 
Pill Machine used by Maryland Phar- 
macists about 1830; Cup Troy Weights 
used by Maryland Pharmacists in 
1800; a Single Beam, Equal Arm Bal- 
ance; The Archibald Suppository Ma- 
chine used in Baltimore about 1800; 
three bottles used by Andrews & 
Thompson, pharmacists in Baltimore in 
1800; Price List, Constitution and By 
Laws of the Maryland Pharmaceutical 
Association; and a picture of store 
owner, Mr. Edward A. Schrader, who 
graduated from the Maryland College 
of Pharmacy in 1887, together with 
a group of very old mortars from this 
store. 

During the preparation of the phar- 
macy material for the exhibit it was 
learned that Dr. William Lyon con- 
ducted the first drug store in Balti- 
more in 1746, at the corner of Balti- 
more and Market (now Calvert) 
Streets; and that Dr. John Boyd estab- 
lished the second drug store in Bal- 
timore in May 1767. 

Seventh Annual Frolic 

Approximately five hundred persons, 
represented by 120 members of the 
Alumni Association, 144 students of 
the School of Pharmacy, 165 guests 
and other friends attended the Seventh 
Annual Frolic sponsored by the Alumni 
Association of the School of Pharmacy 
on Thursday evening, November 12, 
1953 at the Odd Fellows Hall, Cathe- 
dral and Saratoga Streets, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

The fraternities, sorority and var- 
ious talented students participated in 
the competitive performances offered 
as the entertainment of the evening. 
Three fraternities — Iota Chapter Phi 
Delta Chi; Beta Chapter, Phi Alpha; 
Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega; 
Epsilon Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sig- 




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ma Sorority; The Newman Club; and 
three individuals competed for the 
coveted Bernard Cherry Activity Cup 
and for the prize money amounting 
to $75.00. This is the second cup 
offered by Bernard Cherry, an alumn- 
us of the School of Pharmacy, as the 
one offered six years ago was retired 
last year. 

The Iota Chapter, Phi Delta Chi 
Fraternity received the first prize of 
$25.00 and also the privilege of hold- 
ing the cup for the current year, with 
the hope of retaining the cup when 
they have won the first prize on two 
more occasions. The second prize was 
won by the Beta Chapter of the Phi 
Alpha "Fraternity— $15.00. The other 
fraternities and contestants received 
varying amounts ranging from $10.00 
to $2.50. 

President Alexander J. Ogrinz wel- 
comed the large audience; Mr. Louis 
Davidov, First Vice-President pre- 
sented the performers and Dean Noel 
E. Foss participated in the awarding 
of prizes to the representatives of the 
successful group or person. The judges 
of the competitive performances were 
Mr. Benjamin Gaboff, Mr. Arthur W. 
Shay and Mr. William C. McKenna. 

Refreshments were served and danc- 
ing continued until 1 A. M. The of- 
ficers and committees of the Alumni 
Association worked very faithfully and 
continuously to make the affair a suc- 
cess, and were rewarded by receiving 
many commendations from those pres- 
ent as to the enjoyment of the occasion. 
Members of the alumni, students in 
the School of Pharmacy and their 
friends look forward to these annual 
frolics as one of the most enjoyable 
occasions of the year. 

The annual entertainment and dance 
of the Alumni Association — the Valen- 
tine Party, will be held on February 
11, 1954. 



Sez Testudinette: 



Personal Note : — The "calendar has caught 
up With me'' and I will he retiring from the 
School of Pharmacy on November 30. 19. r >3. 

/ will no longer he supplying "Maryland" 
with news of the School* of Pharmacy and 
our Alumni Association. I hare greatly en- 
joyed collecting articles and doing thin chore. 
Reading the "want ads" will he my next oc- 
cupation, and if they fail, perhaps I will 
learn how to loaf graciously. 

Kind personal regards and best wishes. — 
It. Olive Oole. 



-jfWtW 





o 



ne thing worse 
than a man who 
doesn't know his 
business is telling 
you that it's none of 
yours . . . An escap- 
ed lunatic was cap- 
tured while giving a 
lady his seat in the 
subway . . . Why ad- 
vertise your troub- 
les? There's no 
market for 'em . . . 
Women are sup- 
posed to be the gab- 
by gender, but how 
about that Senator 
who talked twenty-two hours? ... A 
woman who is smart enough to ask 
a man's advice seldom is dumb enough 
to take it ... A small man lets little 
things assume great importance . . . 
Kindness is synonymous with happi- 
ness . . . The best way out of diffi- 
culty is through it. 



College of r==^==^^ 

Physical Education 
Recreation & Health 

Returns From Korea 

Maj. Charles W. Weidinger, (Phys. 
Ed. '40), returned home after 
serving with the Korea Civil Assistance 
Command (KCAC) at Pusan. He has 
been in Korea since May 1952. 

KCAC, operating through field teams 
in every province, distributes relief 
supplies and furnishes technical advice 
for the reconstruction of Korea. 

The major, a veteran of World War 
II who re-entered the Army in 1951, 
was formerly district manager for the 
Equitable Life Assurance Society of 
the United States. 



College of 



"O yes, since Roderick's been promoted to 
Department Head all the office personnel 
laughs at his jokes." 



Military Science 



In Alaska 

Lt. Col. William Lorimer III, (Mili- 
tary Sc. '53), is in Alaska on duty 
at Fort Richardson. 

Army units stationed in Alaska un- 
dergo intensive field training while pro- 
viding a defense force for the north- 
ern approaches to the U.S. and Canada. 

Since entering the Army in 1941 
Colonel Lorimer has been awarded the 
Army of Occupation medal for duty in 
Germany, World War II Victory Rib- 
bon, Asiatic-Pacific Theater Ribbon, 
Air Medal and the American Defense 
Service Ribbon. 



28 



"Maryland" 



College of 



Arts and Sciences 



Lois Eld Ernest 



Home From Korea 

Lt. Edward G. Howard, (A&S '47), 
returned home after four months 
in Korea with the 25th Infantry Di- 
vision. 

Lt. Howard, who was assigned to 
Company E of the 35th Regiment, holds 
the Combat Infantryman Badge and 
the Korean and UN Service Ribbons. 
He entered the Army in February 1951. 

With National Symphony 

Charlton Meyer, instructor in the 
University music department, was 
piano soloist with the National Sym- 
phony orchestra at Constitution hall, 
Washington. 

The program was broadcast on radio. 

Bourbon Democracy 

Dr. H. S. Merrill's book, "Bourbon 
Democracy in the Middle South, 1865- 
1898," recently appeared from the 
Press of Louisiana State University. 

Busy Speaker 
Dr. W. M. Gewehr participated in a 
forum on the United Nations pro- 
gram sponsored by the League of 
Women Voters in Baltimore. He ad- 
dressed the Lecture Group of Balti- 
more on "Lessons from the Korean 
War" and, in Washington addressed 
the District Rotary Club Convention on 
"Our World." He was also luncheon 
speaker at the Washington Optimist 
Club. Dr. Gewehr has talked to this 
Club on more occasions than any other 
speaker they have ever had. 

Faculty Changes 

Dr. James Ferguson is this year 
serving as Lecturer at the University 
of Illinois. 

Mr. William Harbaugh has become 
Assistant Professor at the University 
of Connecticut. 

Dr. Richard Lowitt has become As- 
sistant Professor at the State Uni- 
versity of Rhode Island. 

New York Exhibit 

The Babcock Gallery, New York City 
featured a one-man exhibition of the 
paintings of Herman Maril, of the De- 
partment of Art. The exhibition elicited 
much favorable comment from critics 
in newspaper and magazines. Carlyle 
Burrows of the New York Herald Tri- 
bune stated: "There is an orderly sense 
of structure and balanced tonal com- 
position about the paintings ... It is 
proper to credit this artist with a gen- 
uine note of charm that Maril has 
developed and strengthened as his work 
has progressed." 

The exhibition consisted of twenty 
oils completed in the last three years. 
Mr. Maril has exhibited throughout this 
country and abroad and is represented 
in many of the leading museums and 
private collections. He is also a visit- 
ing teacher at the Philadelphia Museum 
School of Art. 

"Maryland" 



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2y 




Do YOU insist on YOUR milk 
in GLASS Bottles— —or do you 
accept if in substitute con- 
tainers? 

GLASS is a vitreous material re- 
quiring no coating for protection 
of its contents. The GLASS bottle 
is sterilized at the dairy and it can 
impart no foreign taste or odor — 
or flakes of coating — to the milk. 
It is a rigid and stable container, 
will not crush easily in handling 
and not subject to leaking in your 
refrigerator. And you can SEE 
both quality and quantity you re- 
ceive. 

In many markets a premium is 
charged for the less durable, single 
service container and, of course, it 
has no return value to customer, 
storekeeper or dairy. Added ex- 
pense, which ultimately must be 
absorbed by the consumer, is the 
result. 

MILK IS BETTER IN GLASS 
BOTTLES 

There is no substitute as good. 

THE BUCK GLASS CO. 

Fort Ave. •& Lawrence St. 
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RECEIVES BORDEN AWARD 

Dr. Gordon W. Cairns, Dean of the College of Agriculture, presents tlte Borden Agriculture 
Award to Senior Xeri A. Clark. The Borden Award, ($300.). goes to the senior student 
who Ims achieved the highest average grade for afl college work preceding the senior iiemi 
among eligible students in the senior class who have taken two or more courses in dairying. 



College of 



Agriculture 

^^^^^^^^^i Dr. Howard L. Stier 

George S. Bunting, Jr., (Agric. '50) 
South America, on an exploration 
of the southern extension of the Guiana 
Highlands on the Venezuelan Fron- 
tier. 

Bunting is on a three-man team 
headed by Dr. Bassett Maguire, bot- 
anical explorer from the New York 
Botanical Gardens, who has probed in 
that region of South America for a 
decade. The third man on the team is 
Dr. J. J. Wurdack, also of the Botanical 
Gardens. 

The team will travel far up the Rio 
Orinoco to its junction with the Rio 
Casiquiari, then southward to the 
main goal of the expedition, a recent- 
ly discovered but unexplored mountain 
range on the Brazilian frontier called 
Cerro Jimey. 

In four months on this range, 
thousands of botanical specimens hith- 
erto unknown will be collected. 

The Guiana Highlands region is 
composed of great sandstone, tabletop 
mountains, each isolated from the 
other.. Today, only the tops of the 
mountains exhibit the relics of past 
flora. 

Bunting is the 26-year-old son of 
Mr. and Mrs. George Bunting of Poco- 
moke City, Md. 

Polio Virus Fotos 

Referring to various recent news- 
paper items, including an AP dispatch, 
showing electron microscopic pictures 
of tissue culture grown poliomyelitis 
virus, stating that this was the first 



time the poliomyelitis had been photo- 
graphed authentically, Major Reginald 
L. Reagan, U.S.A., Retired, Professor 
of Virus Diseases of the Maryland 
State Board of Agriculture, Live Stock 
Sanitary Service, points out that such 
claims are in error. 

"Such photographs were made by 
us", said Major Reagan, "and photo- 
graphically published in May and June 
of 1950. This was the Mahoney strain 
— a sub-strain of the Brunhilde strain. 
The Brunhilde strain and Leon strain 
of poliomyelitis were photographed 
several years ago with the electron 
microscope by Professors R. L. Rea- 
gan, D. Schenck and A. L. Brueckner 
of the University of Maryland, and 
these pictures were published in sev- 
eral scientific journals and also in sev- 
eral textbooks." 

In Austria 
2d Lt. Eugene T. Wachter, AGR '51, 
is with U.S. Forces in Austria engaged 
in a cooperative four-power occupation 
of the country with Britain, France 
and Russia. Units are stationed in 
Vienna, Linz, Salzburg and other Aus- 
trian cities, as well as the port of 
Leghorn, Italy, the supply point for 
USFA. 

Lieutenant Wachter was formerly plant 
manager of the Gifford Ice Cream Com- 
pany, Silver Spring, Md. He entered 
Army in February of '52. 

New Dairy Head 

Dr. Glenn H. Beck, new head of the 
dairy department, has spent a life- 
time in dairy farming, study, research 
and teaching, always in the dairy field. 

He is a native of Idaho where his 
parents operated a dairy farm. While 
attending the University of Idaho he 
worked in the college dairy barns and 



30 



"Maryland" 



creamery. He was a member of two 
college judging teams placing second 
high in dairy cattle and third high in 
dairy products at the Pacific Interna- 
tional. 

Idaho And Kansas 

After graduating from Idaho, Dr. 
Beck became a graduate assistant at 
Kansas State College where he ob- 
tained his master's degree in 1!)3S. Be 
served as an instructor at Kansas State 
and superintendent of official testing 
for the next three years. 

He studied at Cornell University for 
a year and returned to Kansas State 
until entering the Army in 1943. He 
served three years as a nutrition of- 
ficer, with 14 months duty in the Philli- 
pines and Japan. 

After the war, he spent two years 
as professor at Kansas and then earned 
a doctor's degree at Cornell in dairy 
husbandry with minors in physiology 
and nutrition. 

Dr. Beck was professor at Kansas 
from 1950 to the present and during 
the summer of 1952, a visiting profes- 
sor at the University of Arkansas. His 
research interests have been primarily 
in artificial breeding and managed 
milking. 

The new dairy head was coach of 
the Kansas State College dairy judging 
teams for eight years and has judged 
dairy cattle at the state fairs of Indi- 
ana, Kansas, Utah, Oklahoma, Idaho 
and the American Royal dairy show. 
4-H Congress 

Maryland's 27 top 4-H'ers took part 
in the 32nd National 4-H Congress in 
Chicago, designed mainly to honor 
state, sectional and national 4-H con- 
test winners. 

Some 1200 delegates from all 48 
states, Alaska, Hawaii and Puerto Rico 
attended. More than 1,800 guests, in- 
cluding visitors from other countries, 
and sponsors of 4-H contests, met with 
the delegation. 

Maryland's 4-H'ers attending the 
Congress were: Anne Arundel County, 
Kathleen Somers, 18; Allegany County, 
Eleanor Smith, 16; Baltimore County, 
Doris Hendrix, 20; George Wills, 17; 
Calvert County, Robert Hutchins, 17; 
George Gott, 18; Suzane Monnett, 18; 
Barbara Jane Lore, 17; Carroll County, 
Olivia Helwig, 19; Corrine Hoff, 17; 
Barbara Myers, 16; Erich Willen, 17; 
Frederick County Donald Easterday, 
19; Geraldine Geisbert, 19; Marybelle 
Remsburg, 19; Ann Runkles, 17; Car- 
roll Leatherman, 20; William Wolf, 19; 
Harford County, Ben Markline, 20; 
Howard County, Louis Arrington, 17; 
Kent County, Betty Lusby, 19; Mont- 
gomery County, Robert Dorsey, 18; R. 
Carson Fender, 20; Gordon Keys, 19; 
Prince Georges, Betty Lou Snyder, 18; 
Queen Annes County, Henry Comegys, 
17; Franklin Moore, 19. 

Accompanying the 4-H Club Con- 
gress delegation are Dorothy Emer- 
son, Mylo Downey and Sherard Wil- 
son of the state 4-H office; Evelyn 
Barker, Cecil County home demonstra- 
tion agent; Mary Ruth Meredith, Cecil 

"Maryland" 



County, Junior <liapii one; J. \ M.- 

Henry, assistant county agent, Gar* 
rett County; Robert <;. Millar, 

sistant county agent, Wicomico Coun- 
ty; and Evelyn Byrd Ellltcheson, in- 
formation specialist, University of 
.Maryland Extension Sei \ ice. 

Livestock Exposition 

Attending the International Live- 
stock Exposition in Chicago for live- 
stock judging competition were: Rob- 
ert Pirey, Jr., 17, of Clear Spring, 
Washington county; James .Martin, l«, 
Hampstead, Baltimore county; Henrj 
Freter, is, Sykesville, Frederick co,; 

and Donald Bennett, 19, of Sykesville. 
Accompanying the team were co- 
coaches, assistant county agent Wil- 
Boyd Whittle, Extension specialist, ani- 
liam Allenberg, Carroll county, and 
mal husbandry, University of Mary- 
land. 



College of 



Special & Continuation 

Studies 



Richard H. Stottler 



With the help of Mr. George J. 
Dillavou, University of Mary- 
land instructor at Pepperrell Air Force 
Base, St. John's, Newfoundland, the 
students have organized a club which 
they call '"The Merry-Landers." All 
present and former students of the 
University of Maryland have joined 
together for the purpose of meeting 
each other and sharing their common 
experiences in their studies and in 
their military activities while in the 
Northeast Air Command. The club 
is considering the adoption of a war 
orphan in the name of the club, and 
they plan to raise the money to do 
this by giving parties. 

The constitution of this club, desig- 
nates Dr. Ray Ehrensberger, Dean, and 
Dr. Stanley Drazek, Assistant Dean of 
the College of Special and Continua- 
tion Studies as honorary members. 
Major Alexander R. Posniak is the 
first president of this club. 

State Medical Lecture 

Dr. Russell S. Fisher, Chief Medical 
Examiner, State of Maryland spoke on 
the "Investigation of Sudden Death" 
at the fourth session of the "Institute 
for Maryland Law Enforcement Offi- 
cers." 

Dr. Fisher, a recognized authority in 
the field of Legal Medicine, lectures 
throughout the country at "Seminars in 
Homicide Investigation." In his talk 
on the "Investigation of Sudden Death" 
Dr. Fisher emphasized the legal 
aspects of medical evidence, how much 
evidence is collected at the scene of the 
crime and preserved to support the 
prosecution of the criminal. 



Lumnus: "No woman ever made me 
look stupid." 

Lumna: "Who did then?" 



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?n 



EXECUTIVE 



DEPARTMENT, ANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND 

To t/»e A/umni ano* Friends or trie Alumni of the 
University of Maryland 



BHSSTINra 



s Just a year ago. I wrote you that, God willing, the New Year then 
at hand would reveal new cause and justification for that faith which 
it maintained and the confidence which it inspired. 

America's sons were dying then in distant Korea and often, nearly 
everywhere, the enemy of our way of life seemed to hold the initiative. 

We still are in a very troubled and unsettled period of history, 
frought with danger and charged with the threat of terrible war. 

But I do believe our faith and our hope in the past year have been 
justified. 

The slaughter in Korea was brought to an end. In Europe, there 
are encouraging signs of unrest and at least the rumbling of re- 
hellion among those who have been enslaved by Communism. The 
Kremlin, struggling with troubles and disorder within its empire, 
has lost the intiative in the cold conflict between our freedom and 
Communist oppression. 

There can be no doubt that the education and enlightenment of 
the American people has played an important part in these favor- 
able developments, and a major share of the credit for this belongs, 
of course, to our fine schools, colleges and universities. 

Here in Maryland, we are particularly proud of our own State 
University, its faculty, its student body and its active and aggressive 
Alumni. 

Let me conclude this holiday message to that staunch and loyal 
Alumni with an expression of renewal and enhancement of that faith 
and that hope which typify the spirit of the University of Maryland, 
of the State of Maryland, and of the United States of America. 

With highest regards and best wishes for all, I am, 

Sincerely, 



Theodore R. McKeldin 
Governor 



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51" this world of tensions ;ind highpoweretl diplomatic maneuvering, 
in this country of high costs o 

charges of bad faith, almost of treason, among our political leader-, 
one might think that there is very little encouragement for the fu- 
ture, and from that develop quickly deep pessimism. However, I am 
not one of those that look upon America as being at a crossroad-. 
where, if it goes in one direction all is lost and if it goes in another 
direction everything will be perfect. 

From the facts of history and from my own experiences in the 
years that I have lived, it is evident to me that there is one basic 
fact in life, namely, that, notwithstanding all our difficulties, each 
succeeding generation of people is a better generation; that condition- 
today are better for the American people and better than they ever 
have been in this history of the country; that out of the melting pot 
that constitutes the American way of life, there has developed, and 
will continue to develop, better people and a higher regard for other-. 
i\'o other nations, no other people, have ever given so generously to 
help mankind; no previous generation, since the beginning, has done 
so much to answer the question, "Am I my brother's keeper?" 

Let us not waste time in worrying about the mistakes of the past, 
fearing for mistakes of the future. Mistakes have been made, and 
will continue to be made, but there will also be man> constructive ef- 
forts that will bear good fruit. These constructive efforts in the 
years to come will overbalance the mistakes and will provide a belter 
way of life. People are moving onward and upward, despite blunders, 
which, for the moment, may have seemed tragic and horrible. Let us 
keep our faith in the future, and be not swerved from that faith, 
based on the God who knoweth what is best, and who. taking heed 
even of the sparrow's fall, will always provide for those He h:i- 
created. 

Sincerelv, 





/ iixl ROW, h 

'51 . t'h ctronici 

Production l>< 

tiecond Row 

ironies : II . I. 
■ 
I hi i (I Row : 
tro Hi eltuiiicul 



MARYLAND ALUMNI WITH GLENN L. MARTIN COMPANY 
a in right :W. It. McCormack, '5ft, Electronics; C. it Wets, '43, Aerodynamics; ./. ./. Krajoric '32, Employment ; J. It. hammer. 
; II. Pincki -i iii II. '51, Electronics; IV. It. Brown, Jr., '50, Flight Tent; A. ./. Michael, '50, Aerodynamics; •/. '/'. Pfciffcr, '50, 

r /■: Ueintz, Jr., '48 Employment; it. 0. Ensor, '53, \iroiliiiiiiinies : II. S. Wicket, Jr., Ms. strut-tun a ; ';. Downs, ':'.4, Blcc- 
farks, '51, Electronics; l>. II. Russ, '53, strut-tun*: v. /. Felt, ,//-.. '50, Electro Mechanical; It. E. Motion, '53, Production 

r. 8. O'Hearne, "52, Structures; •/. r. Curlander, 44. Electro Mechanical; ('. .V. OrfeU, '40. structures: O. II. stores. '39, Blec- 
. < / Brockman, '37, Production Design; P. A, Moloney, '51, strut-tuns: l. k. Hennighausen, '40, strueiuns. 



Glenn L. Martin 
College of 



Engineering & 
Aeronautical Sciences 



Co/. O. //. Saunders '10 
- 4. Lawrence Guess '51 



With Glenn L. Martin 

//\V/e are pleased to report upon 
Vr the number and progress of 
the graduates of the University of 
Maryland who are Martin engineers," 
writes J. E. Dahlman, College Relations 
Representative for the Glenn L. Martin 
Company, Ratimore. (See adjacent 
foto.) 

"The opportunity for us to publicly 
express our favorable opinion of the 
type of training and the caliber of men 
that are associated with the University 
of Maryland is appreciated. It is our 
hope that this will play a part in de- 
veloping the continuance of relations 
which should exist between leading 
engineering institutions and organiza- 
tions such as the University. Thank 
you," concludes Mr. Dahlman. 

There follows a list of the Maryland 
graduates referred to by Mr. Dahlman, 
the departments in which they work 
and their class year, viz: 

i '. K. Anderson, '•;'.» Electronics; K. I). 
Illakeslee, '36 Structures; .1. C. Bowers, '52 
si rui i mi- ; i I. Brockman, ':;7 Production 
Design; W. It. Brown, Jr., '50 Plight Test; 
J, r. Curlander, II Electro Mechanical; C. 
It, Dietz, '43 Aerodynamics; .1. T. Eichel 
herger, '51 Structures; i.. II. Eney, '52 Struc 
i urea II C. El lerodj oamlcs : N. E. 

I'l-n. Jr.. :,<> Electro Mechanical; B. Hello, 

IS Design Development; I.. K. Hennighausen 
'40 Structures; J, it. Kammer, t>i Electron 
les; a E Kanode, '35 Electro Mechanical; 
J. w. Kolsi ' ii >2 Eli ctro Mechanical : P. A. 
Maloney, '."il Structures; W. It. McCormack, 
•50 Electronics; A. J. Michael, '60 Aero 
dynamics; i; r Uolloy, '53 Production De 
— i i_- ■ . : II <i Moshcr, -It.. Production De 
sign: V. I. Morgan, '46 Structures; II. S. 
N'lckel, Jr. is Structures; II. J. Obldzinskl. 
Design Development; >' \ Odell, '40 Struc 
inn- . II I. Parks, '51 Electronic* ; B t) 
'43 Production Design; J. T. Pfeiffer, 
.■.ii Production Design: n Plnckernell, '.".I 
I !|ei troi h H Russ, '53 81 rucl a 

J.J. Saunders, ii Structures; I, It. Schwartz, 

ii Aerodynamics: I). !•'. shuii/,. '50 Electro 
Mechanical; M Btanka, '.">o structures; G. 



n. Storrs, ':;'.» Electro Mechanical; <;. L. 
Wannall, '-12 Project, and R. P. Wilklns, '60 
Electronics, 

Sales Engineer 

Fred B. Rakemann (E.E. '18) of 
43 N. Forest Avenue, Rockville Cen- 
ter, N. Y., is a Real Estate and Con- 
struction sales Engineer in New York. 

Formerly he was with the Industrial 
Engineering Company of New York 
as Industrial Manager. 

He and his wife Julia M. Rakemann 
have a daughter, Barbara Schneider, 
and two grandchildren, Louis F. Sch- 
neider, 3rd, and Gary B. Schneider. 

Rakemann's military service includes 
duty as a Lieutenant of Calvary in 
1918 to 1920 and as a Captain of 
Engineers from 1942 to 1945. 

He takes an active interest in civic, 
veteran and fraternal affairs as he is 
a member of Auxiliary Police and 
Civil Defense Organizations, American 
Legion, Honorary Reserve of the Army 
of the United States, and Masonic 
bodies. 

Since leaving Maryland in 1918, 
Rakemann has studied Business Ad- 
ministration at Wisconsin University 
in 1921 and Engineering at Purdue 
University in 1925. 

Manufacturer's Agent 

Robert M. Rausch, (M.E. '21) of 
237 Breading Avenue, Ben Avon, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., is Manufacturer's Agent 
for Arrow Safety Device Corporation 
of Mt. Holly, N. J., with which Com- 
pany he has held the position of Vice- 
President and General Manager. 

Formerly he was a District Sales 
Manager for Sylvania Electric Cor- 
poration. 

Rausch and his wife, Edith W. 
Rausch, have two children, namely, 
a son Robert W. Rausch 25 years of 
age and daughter, Mrs. Frederick A. 
Wilson. 

Rausch holds membership in Theta 
Chi and in Masonic Organizations. 
Gastonia, N.C., Bank Executive 

Joseph G. Reading, (EE '21) of 1218 



Crescent Avenue, Gastonia, North 
Carolina, is Executive Vice-President, 
National Bank of Commerce, Gas- 
tonia, N. C. 

Previously he was Assistant National 
Bank Examiner an officer of the South 
Carolina National Bank of Greenville, 
S. C, and Vice-President and cashier 
of the National Bank of Commerce, 
Gastonia, N. C, 

Reading and his wife, Joyce Mc- 
Cuen Reading have one daughter, Miss 
Ann Joye Reading. 

Reading informs us that his mili- 
tary service was for a period of sixty- 
four days. 

He is quite active in civic affairs, 
as he is Past President of the Amer- 
ican Business Club; a member of the 
Kiwanis; Elks; former President of 
the Gastonia Chamber of Commerce; 
member of the Gastonia Council of 
Boy Scouts; and a member of the 
Advisory Board of the Salvation Army. 

Drawing Teacher and Writer 

Edgar Fan- Russell, (EE '22) of 
3705 Reservoir Road, N. W., Wash- 
ington 7, D. C, is a teacher of Me- 
chanical drawing and architectural 
drawing at Roosevelt High S chool, 
Washington, D. C. 

Russell has formerly held positions 
with the Alvey-Ferguson Conveying 
Machinery Co., of Cincinnati, Ohio, 
and was Engineer for the Plant De- 
partment of Chesapeake and Potomac 
Telephone Co., of Washington, D. C. 

Russell married the former Ida Re- 
becca Fragier and they have a son, 
Lt. (J.G.) Edgar Parr Russell, Jr., 
U. S. Navy, twenty-six years of age 
who, on June 14, 1952 married Miss 
Jean Neely Peake. 

Russell served for seventeen years 
in the Reserve of the U. S. Army, 
(Infantry), and is now on the Hon- 
orary Retired List. He is a member 
of the American Ordnance Association; 
Ohio Gun Collectors Association; Hon- 
orary Member of International As- 
sociation of Chiefs of Police; Treasurer, 
(1951-1953) High School Teachers As- 



34 



"Marylana"' 



sociation; Rurleith Citizens Associa- 
tion; and member of I'hi Sigma Kappa 
Fraternity. 

Russell has published many articles 
of importance in his field, among 
which are: "What Does a Map Mean 
to You," in "The Reserve Officer" May 
L940: "Dress Up Your Mechanical 
Drawing- Room," in "Industrial Arts 
and Vocational Education", October 
1941: The Knockers Club" in The Dis- 
trict Teacher", December 1941; "Me- 
chanical Drawing for Slow-Movers" in 
"Secondary Education, the bulletin of 
the Department of Secondary Teachers 
of the National Education Association, 
Peb.-March 1942; "The Washington 
High School Cadet Corps" in "Health 
and Physical Education", November 
1942; "Map Drawing in One Easy 
Lesson" in "The Journal of Education", 
Feb. 1943; "The Cog— It turns a Quar- 
ter Century," School Shop; Jan. 1951; 
and "History as your Hobby" in "The 
Social Studies", March 1951.' 

US Coast and Geodetic Survey 

William Shofnes, (CE '24), and also 
LLR '29 of Georgetown University, is 
a Physicist with the U.S. Coast and 
Geodetic Survey, Department of Com- 
merce and resides at 2815 9th Street, 
So. Apt. 82-C, Arlington, Va. 

His wife is Jeannetta Cohen Shofnes; 
they have no children. 

Shofnes has held membership in 
Phi Alpha; Tau Reta Pi; the Amer- 
ican Congress on Surveying and Map- 
ping; the American Geophysical Union; 
and Washington Society of Engineers. 

Des Moines, Iowa Engineer 

Harold R. Skinner (CE '47) of 112 
S. W. Second Street, Des Moines 9, 
Iowa, is an engineer with Rowser Engi- 
neering Co., Des Moines, Iowa. 

Before joining the company with 
which he now is, he was Engineer 
with the Rureau of Reclamation, In- 
diaola, Nebraska. 

Skinner is married and he and his 
wife, Agnes E. Skinner have two chil- 
dren, John Philip, six-and-a-half-years 
of age and Margaret Christine, two- 
and-a-half years of age. 

Skinner served with the Engineers 
in World War II from June 1942 to 
May 1946 with duty overseas in Cen- 
tral Europe. 

He is active in Masonic Organiza- 
tions, and is Master of his Lodge. 

Shipbuilding 

John C. Sterling, (ME '16) of 2207 
Parish Ave., Newport News, Virginia, 
is superintendent of the Machine Shops 
Division, Newport News Shipbuilding 
and Dry Dock Company. 

He has been with the same company 
since his graduation from Maryland. 

He and his wife, Gladys Shedd Ster- 
ling, have four children and are grand- 
parents to six grandchildren. 

Their children are: John C, Jr., 32, 
Mrs. Jean Sterling McRae; Mrs. Nancy 
Sterling Rrown; and Robert Laurence 
Sterling, 18 years of age. 

Sterling holds membership in Sigma 
Chi; Tau Reta Pi; Virginia Chamber 
of Commerce; Engineer's club of the 

"Maryland" 



Virginia Peninsula; American Society 
of Mechanical Engineers; Society <>f 

Naval Architects and .Marine I 
neers; American Society of \ 

Engineers; r.s. Naval Institute; and 
Propeller Club of the United Stat 

Senior Scholarships 

l he establishment of a Union Car- 
bide senior-year technical scholarship 
program at n engineering colleges and 
universities, including the i niversity 
of Maryland, by .Morse <;. Dial, Presi- 
dent, Union Carbide and Carbon Cor- 
poration, 

The scholarships, individually spon- 
sored by various divisions of the Cor- 
poration, will cover the full tuition 
for a student's senior year, and $200 
for ins necessary hooks and fees. The 
program, which includes one or more 
senior-year scholarships at each of the 
41 participating universities, went into 
effect this fall. 

The selection of scholarship recip- 
ients will be made by the universities 
themselves in accordance with their 
normal procedures. This will include 
consideration of the student's past per- 
formance and his potential for engi- 
neering and scientfic study, as well as 
his potential for successful employment 
in industry. 

A. M.S. Presentation 

Dr. Alfred Huber, of the Institute for 
Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathe- 
matics, presented a paper before the 
American Mathematical Society Meet- 
ing in New York on "An lsoperimetric 
Inequality for Surfaces of Variable 
Gaussion Curvature." An abstract of 
the paper appeared in the bulletin of 
the American Mathematical Society. 

Writes Eighth Book 
Dr. John E. Younger, Head of Me- 
chanical Department, has recently com- 
pleted a manuscript for a graduate 
text book on advanced dynamics. This 
will be the eighth text book written 
by Dr. Younger, and it will be pub- 
lished early next year. 

Wind Tunnel Study 
Professor A. W. Sherwood of the 
Aeronautical Engineering Department 
has been named by the General Ac- 
counting Office to a three man com- 
mission to study wind tunnel facilities 
in the United States. Serving with 
Professor Sherwood on the commission 
are Professors Dutton of Georgia Tech 
and Razak of the University of Wichi- 
ta. The committee will make a tech- 
nical survey of all subsonic, transonic, 
supersonic and hypersonic wind tun- 
nels to determine if these facilities are 
adequate to meet the demands in the 
areas in which they are located. 

Record Attendance 

At the 8th annual short course on 
aggregates and concrete held at the 
University there were 134 representa- 
tives from sand and gravel companies 
and ready-mix concrete companies in 
attendance, which set an all time high 
for the course's enrollment. This 
course is offered in cooperation with 




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the Department of Civil Engineering 
and has as its purpose the instruction 
in basic and fundamental technical in- 
formation on aggregates and concrete. 
Sabbatical Leave 

Professor C. A. Shreeve of the Me- 
chanical Engineering Department is 
on a sabbatical leave for the current 
school year. This leave is to enable 
Professor Shreeve to complete his 
graduate work for his doctor's degree 
at the Johns Hopkins University. 
Social Notes 

(Sorry, girls, but by next June, it 
looks as though every member of the 
Mechanical Engineering faculty will 
be married.) 

To Phi Kappa Phi 

Professor Reed of Electrical, Sher- 
wood of Aeronautical, Shreeve of Me- 
chanical and Huff of CJhemical have re- 
cently been elected to Phi Kappa Phi, 
the honorary scholarship fraternity. 
Test Pilot 

Harry Brackett, '50 (Aeronautical 
Engineering) is currently employed as 
a test pilot for the Chance-Vought Di- 
vision of the United Aircraft Corpora- 
tion. Harry was recently designated 
the outstanding member of his grad- 
uating class in the Test Pilot Train- 
ing Course at the Naval Air Test 
Center, Patuxent River, Maryland. 
News Of Civil Engineering Grads 

1952 Graduates — Jack Rothenhoefer, 
a Korean veteran from the ROTC pro- 
gram, has been overseas 9 months and 
will be home in 3 months more. 

Chots Mclamb, Saul Seltzer, and Paul 
Lee are working for the Baltimore 
County Sanitary. Chots and Paul are 
doing sewerage design while Saul hand- 
les the work in the structures depart- 
ment. 

Mclamb was married 4 months ago 
and is living in Dundalk. 

Pete Mollis finally left Balto. Co. 
Sewerage work and went to California 
for a job. 

Harry Cook is in California too, 
working for an oil company. 

Wess Miller, Joe Provosto, Ace Pern- 
ios and Charlie Clark were last seen 
at the Engineer's Club in Baltimore 
on Oct. 14. Clark was released from 
the Air Force last spring. 

MacDorman and G. H. Ward were 
lucky in having to serve only one year 
in the AF. Ward is now taking busi- 
ness courses at Maryland. 

Joe Petrella went on active duty at 
Wright-Patterson last April. He came 
home on leave this summer and got 
married. 

Meredith is on active duty at Lourry 
AFB, Colo, receiving training in radar 
and radio school. 

Joe Bourdon is teaching class in 
the Air Force. 

Calvin Coulborne permanently went 
to work for Whitman and Requart, 
water supply contractors in Balto. 

Jim Sunderland is with the B&O. 

Ken Felton works with the Inter- 
state Commission on the Potomac 



River. Ken started out studying pol- 
lution in the river. 

1953 Graduates — Pancho Gonsalves 
has just left for the AF in Cambridge, 
Mass. and so has Bob Molloy, our 
former ASCE president. Bob got mar- 
ried last August. 

Richard Norair got his orders to 
report soon for active duty. Last June, 
Dick married his sweetheart Alice. A 
big reception was held in DC. 

Nothing has been heard from Peary 
Lear, but he did get married the first 
thing after graduation and supposed- 
ly took a job with Pennsy, R.R. 

Dick Walker, who was also married 
last June, is now going to graduate 
school at Purdue. 

Donald Lashley and Al Peter are 
practicing engineering at the Wash. 
Suburban Sanitary. 

Wild Bill Skillen is married and is 
working in Charleston, West Va. for 
the Columbia Gas Co. 

Bob Pumphrey continued his work 
with the Geological Survey handling 
studies on stream and ground water 
flows. He just received his orders Oct. 
28. 

Winnie O. Carter is practicing engi- 
neering in DC designing school build- 
ings for the state of Md. 

Busy Dean 

Following are some recent activities 
of Dean S. S. Steinberg of the College 
of Engineering: 

Served during the summer months 
as Consulting Engineer to the Mary- 
land States Roads Commission. 

Addressed the se- 
niors of Northwest- 
ern Junior High 
School i n Prince 
Georges County on 
"Engineering as a 
Career." 

Attended the an- 
nual convention of 
the Association of 
Land Grant Col. 
leges and Universi- 
ties held in Colum- 
bus, Ohio. 

Served as a mem- 
ber of a panel at the District of Co- 
lumbia Conference on Industrial Safety. 

Served as moderator of a panel at 
the Engineering Job Forum held at 
the University. 

Was designated to represent the As- 
sociation of Land Grant Colleges and 
Universities at the installation of the 
new Rector of Catholic University, 
at which time President Eisenhower 
was awarded an honorary degree. 

Attended the meeting in New York, 
N. Y., of the Engineers' Council for 
Professional Development (ECPD), the 
national accrediting agency for engi- 
neering colleges. 

Presided at recent meetings of the 
Maryland State Board of Registration 
for Professional Engineers and Land 
Surveyors, and the Maryland Bureau 
of Central Surveys and Maps as Chair- 
man of both these groups. 




Dean Steinberg 



36 



"Maryland" 



Highway Engineering Course 
A series of in-service training 

courses, each of two-weeks duration, 
are being offered to selected highway 
personnel. The first course, dealing 
with Highway Soils began in Novem- 
ber. Succeeding courses take up geo- 
metric design, bridge design, materials, 
Construction, traffic, and similar topics. 

This regional advance highway train- 
ing program is offered by the College 
of Engineering in cooperation with the 
State highway departments of Mary- 
land, Delaware, Virginia, West Vir- 
ginia and the District of Columbia, 
and with the assistance of the U. S. 
Bureau of Public Roads, the Highway 
Research Hoard of the National Re- 
search Council, and the American 
Association of State Highway Officials. 

The courses are not of the con- 
ference type but consist of intensive 
training, in small sections, at which 
actual highway problems are solved 
by the student under the guidance of 
highway engineers expert in their re- 
spective fields. The courses include 
classroom and laboratory instruction, 
demonstrations, and field inspections 
where advisable. 

Vast Expenditures 

In view of the vast sums of money 
being expended by the state highway 
departments under their present pro- 
grams of highway development, and 
the even greater expenditures planned 
for the future, it is of the utmost im- 
portance that the engineering personnel 
of these departments be well trained 
and kept abreast of the latest develop- 
ments in the highway field. Maryland 
alone plans to spend $568 million dol- 
lars on road construction and recon- 
struction during the next twelve years. 

In recent years, highway research 
has developed a great deal of new in- 
formation related to design, construc- 
tion, operation and maintenance as 
apnlied to both rural and urban high- 
ways. This information is widely scat- 
tered and not readily available to the 
average hisrhway engineer, who is a 
man generally too busy with his daily 
duties to have time to locate and digest 
this material. The latest advances in 
highway design, construction, opera- 
tion and maintenance, if applied by 
each highway department, would result 
in great savings of funds, in increased 
utility, and in greater safety. 




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37 




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S36 W. PRATT ST., BALTIMORE 1 
SAratoga 7-4446 

In Our Second Generation 
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HOME ECONOMICS FASHIONS 

At tlir College of Home Economics fashion show freshman Honey Ladil, modeling an evening 
dress and freshman Nancy tfelson in skirt and blouse. 

College of ^=^===^= 



Home Economics 

Mrs. Joseph Longridge 
^==^== Ella M. Fazzalari 



HOSPITAL 
EQUIPMENT 



MUlberry 5-2847 

THE 

COLSON-MERRIAM 
COMPANY 

MUlberry 5 2847 
Baltimore 2, Md. 



Borden Award 

Alice Phillips, Senior in Home Eco- 
nomics, received the Borden 
Award for Scholarship on Oct. 22. The 
award was presented at the Home Eco- 
nomics Club meeting. 

The Borden Home 
Economics Scholar- 
ship of $300 is 
granted to that stu- 
dent in the College 
of Home Economics 
who has had two or 
more of the regular- 
ly listed courses in 
food and nutrition 
and who, upon en- 
tering the senior 
year of study, has 
achieved the high- 
est average grade of 
all other similarly eligible students in 
all preceding college work. 
Faculty Changes 
Among the new members of the 
College of Home Economics Faculty 




Miss Phillips 



38 



two are former students. Mary Eliza- 
beth Rockwell Eyler who took her 
B.S. in Practical Art and received her 
masters in August in Textiles and 
Clothing is now on the staff of the 
Textiles and Clothing Department. 
Edward Longley also received his de- 
gree in Practical Art and did further 
work at Columbia. He is now on the 
staff of the Practical Art Department. 

Two other members of the Practical 
Art Department are William Wyman 
from the Massachusetts School of Art 
and Charles Bradley from the Uni- 
versity of Florida. 

The Foods and Nutrition depart- 
ment is fortunate to have two special 
lecturers this fall, Mrs. Dorothy Tau- 
signant and Mrs. Fern Woodworth. 
Textile Teachers 

From October 22 through October 
25, the Department of Textiles and 
Clothing was hostess in Washington 
to the Conference of College Teachers 
of Textiles and Clothing in the East- 
ern region. The meetings were held 
at the Shoreham. On one afternoon 
the guests divided into groups for 
Field trips of interest in the Wash- 
ington area. 

Overseas 

Some graduates have traveled far. 
Audrey Dugdale Hatsy, has been in 

"Maryland" 



Germany. Amy Heckinger is in the 
service in the Orient. Gladys Oberlin 
is in Brazil. 

Too Much Waste 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Whittle, Jr., 
the latter was Suzi Miller, left for 
Europe in October where Charles will 
study for a year in Holland on a 
Fulbright Scholarship. 

Jane McAllister is teaching Home 
Economics in Hulett, Wyoming. 

The Executive Board held its fall 
meeting at Vie homo of Hilda Jones 
Nystrom. There were reports on the 
projects now being carried on. A 
committee for the spring reunion was 
appointed. 

Betty Graf, who had the unusual job 
of cooking the fish for the girls who 
volunteered to help in a nutrition re- 
search experiment is one of the most 
interesting foreign students at Mary- 
land. 

Betty, a junior in Home Economics, 
is not really a foreign student, for she 
has made America her permanent 
home, Although she originally came 
from Germany, she has little to say 
about her former country. 

"Oh, 1 could tell you a sob story, 
but American students are not inter- 
ested in that sort of thing." All Betty 
would say was that she thought during 
the last war it would be advisable if 
she left Germany. 

After leaving Germany, Betty lived 
in England, where she became inter- 
ested in dietetics, the field she has 
taken up since she arrived in the U. S. 
in 1946. 

She became interested in dietetics in 
order to save food and make it go 
farther, for so much food is wasted 
in this country while other parts of 
the world have so little. 

"Most people study first in prepara- 
tion for their career, but I first worked 
in my major field and then came to 
Maryland to study. I worked six years 
in the cafeteria of Park School in Balti- 
more, but I discovered that if I were 
to go further in the field of nutrition, 
I would need a college degree." 

After having lived in this country 
and seen it east to west, Betty said 
quietly and simply, "I like the Ameri- 
can way of life best." 




■■Coach. I don't see why you think coed* 
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luncheons from 85.' 
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for reservations phone Chesapeake 3-1216 

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39 



a 



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Charles St. below 25th 
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APPARATUS 

6401 PULASKI HIGHWAY 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



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COMPANY, INC. 



912 E. MONUMENT ST. 
Phone PI 2-4533 



BAITO. 2, MD. 



UNITED CLAY 6. 
SUPPLY CORPORATION 

Building Materials - Brick & Tile 

Johns-Manville Products 

Carrier Refrigeration and 

Air Conditioning 

Tracy Cabinets - P/C Glass Blocks 

ESTATE RANGES 

1 1 22 North Charles Street 

Baltimore 1, Md. Mulberry 5-7200 



MARYLAND BRASS 
& METAL WORKS 

Non-Ferrons Castings 
Since 1866 



MUrdock 6-9424 



Baltimore, Md. 



i BE THE co l : PON 
ON LAST PAGE 



Co//ege of 



Business & Public 
Administration 



Egbert F. Tinley 



In England 

Former Maryland student, Sergeant 
Donald R. Lawrence, USAF, his wife 
and their 10-month-old daughter, are 
learning about life as it has been lived 
in an ivy-covered English village for 
close to a thousand years. 

Sergeant Lawrence is with the Sev- 
enth Air Division at the Brize-Norton 
airdrome, some five miles from Whit- 
ney. He had completed two years at 
Maryland when he entered the service. 

With another 18 months of his en- 
listment to go he is anxious to finish 
his schooling. After an eight hour 
day at the Brize-Norton base, Sergeant 
Lawrence attends classes at Maryland's 
extension school there, continuing his 
studies in business administration. Thus 
far, he has added nine credit hours 
toward his degree. 

"Motor Carriers" Book 
Dr. Charles A. Taff, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Transportation in the College 
of Business and Public Administration, 
is the author of a book entiled "Operat- 
ing Rights of Motor Carriers," pub- 
lished by William C. Brown Company, 
Dubuque, Iowa. The book is a detailed 
study and analysis of the contents of 
fifty volumes containing Motor Carrier 
Cases heard by the Interstate Com- 
mission. The policies which have 
emerged over the years of Commission 
Regulation of Motor Carriers are clear- 
ly outlined and conclusions are drawn 
as to the public interest aspects of 
these policies. 

New Frontiers 

America has replaced its geographi- 
cal frontier with a new one "far more 
promising in opportunity," Neil H. 
Swanson, executive editor of the Bal- 
timore Sunpapers, stated in a lecture 
on "Our American Heritage" sponsored 
by the Department of Journalism. 

Swanson said he had received a letter 
labeling him a "Pollyanna" for several 
beliefs he expressed in previous lecture, 
and claiming that "America is fin- 
ished because all her geographical fron- 
tiers have been devoured and "there 
is no place to go now except down." 

Such a conviction is "more than 
nonsense'" the editor said. "It is almost 
criminal for people who know better 
to propagate that particular kind of 
silliness. America has just begun." 

Swanson pointed out that these are 
not the first "dangerous and troubled 
times" in which Americans have lived 
and that there have always been 
"prophets of despair" who find a great- 
er satisfaction in destruction than in 
building - . 

The noted lecturer contrasted the 
3000 mile limit of the old frontier to 



40 



the unlimited new one, and said we 
talk about space ships as New England- 
ers of the expansion period talked 
about covered wagons going out to 
Oregon. 

Referring to the pioneers' nickname 
for the Rockies — "shining mountains," 
he declared that "the shining moun- 
tains of the new American frontier are 
brighter and far higher." 

He cited as examples many present- 
day industries and observed, "There is 
a frontier in earnest." 

While we tend to associate the old 
frontier with names of towns, forts, 
rivers, and the like, he said the new 
frontier is better represented, nylon, 
rayon, plastic, etc. 

Training Conference 

The Sixth Annual Office Management 
Training Conference convened at the 
University. 

The program was designed to high- 
light functions of office management 
classification as contrasted to office 
supervision. The program was also 
designed to emphasize the reseasoning 
behind the fast-growing movement for 
recognized professionalization of the 
office manager, putting him in his 
rightful place beside the certified ac- 
countant and the other professional 
phases of modern business. 

Speakers were selected for their 
knowledge and experience, as well as 
their ability to clearly delineate the 
problems under discussion. 

There were four two-hour sessions. 

Speakers included: Ernest A. Pullen, 
Florence Pipe Foundry and Machine 
Company, Florence, N. J., General 
Chairman; Dr. J. Freeman Pyle, Dean, 
College of Business and Public Ad- 
ministration; George W. Oliver, Jr., 
Thomas Mechanical Collator Company! 
New York; L. W Babcock, Director of 
Personnel, Hercules Powder Company, 
Wilmington, Delaware; Prof. Albert L. 
Gray, Jr., Director Department of Busi- 
ness, Elizabethtown College, Lancaster, 
Pa.; E. T. Magruder, General Research 
Statistician, Chesapeake and Potomac 
Telephone Company, Washington; Rich- 
ard L. Forster, Ebasco Services, New 
York; Walter Emmerling, General 
Office Manager, The Proctor and 
Gamble Company, Cincinnati, Ohio; 
Ray Leach, York Corporation, York, Pa. 

Discussion leaders included: Clifford 
Anderson, Remington-Rand, Inc.; John 
P. Davidsan, E. I. DuPont, Newark, 
N. J.; Edward J. Richardson, Behr- 
Manning Company, Troy, N. Y.; L. E. 
Welte, International Latex Company, 
Wilmington, Del. 

The conference included a banquet 
at the Statler Hotel, Washington, at 
which the speakers were Dr. Jay W. 
Miller, Area 111 Director, N.O.M.A.; 
Hon. John J. Williams, United States 
Senator from Delaware; Kenneth W. 
Moore, International President, N.O.- 
M.A., and Robert Brown, Treasurer, 
Bird Coal Co. Philadelphia. 

Representatives at the Conference 
attended the Alabama-Maryland foot- 
ball game. 

"Maryland' 1 



This conference was attended by 
representatives of all the National 
Office Management Chapters from the 
area bounded by Albany on the North 
and Washington on the South and will 
include representatives from such cities 
as Philadelphia New York, Baltimore, 
Washington, Newark, Scranton, Harris- 
burg, Lancaster, York, Trenton and 
Atlantic City. It was the best attended 
such conference held in National Ca- 
pitol area. 

At Richmond 
Dr. John G. Gurley was selected to 
attend the Central Banking Seminar 
at the Federal Reserve Bank of Rich- 
mond, Virginia. 

Colleges named to send teachers to 
the seminar were designated by an ad- 
visory committee of educators includ- 
ing Professor Dudley R. Dillard, head 
of the University's Department of Eco- 
nomics. Twenty-three teachers attend- 
ed the conference. They heard discus- 
sions of the theory and practice of 
monetary policy from several of the 
top men in the field, including William 
McChesney Martin, Jr., Chairman of 
the Board of Governors of the Federal 
Reserve System and former president 
of the New York Stock Exchange, and 
William F. Treiber, first vice president 
of the Federal Reserve Bank of New 
York. 

To Cuba And Mexico 

Mr. Ching-chieh Chang, a research 
assistant and graduate student of the 
Department of Geography, University 
of Maryland, has recently been award- 
ed a Fellowship by the Tsinghua Foun- 
dation (New York) to conduct field 
work in Mexico and Cuba in connection 
with his doctoral dissertation. Mr. 
Chang's research topic is "Chinese Pop- 
ulation in Latin America," and he is 
working under the joint direction of 
Dr. Charles Y. Hu and Dr. F. Web- 
ster McBryde, both Professors of Geog- 
raphy at Maryland. 



Terpolosophy 




Learn to think, by 
thinking — learn to 
do, by doing . . . A 
bridegroom is a guy 
who has just lost his 
self-control . . . Char- 
acter is like a rifle; 
it shoots only as high 
as you aim it ... A 
wise man gives careful 
attention to the little things . . . The 
girdle is just a poor substitute for will 
power . . . There is none so irritating 
as someone with less education, but 
more intelligence, than we . . . When 
a woman asks a man for something to 
remember him by, what she really is 
after is his last name . . . Women pre- 
fer the strong, silent type of men — 
they make fewer interruptions . . . I see 
where Mr. and Mrs. Fuller Cupps, up 
country, announce the arrival of trip- 
let girls. They'll be named Dixie, Lily 
and Tulip. 

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Seed Cleaning 

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Fertilizer • Lime 

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sales and service 



AIR CONDITIONERS - REFRIGERATION AUTOMATIC ICE MAKERS 

FORNEY'S ENGINEERING SERVICE 

18 North Hanson Street 
Phone: Easton 651 Easton, Md. 



E. S. ADKINS & COMPANY 

"EVERYTHING NEEDED FOR BUILDING" 
PHONE 3171 SALISBURY, MD. 



41 



on every occasion . . . 
express your thoughts and 
wishes with 
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from 




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Florist 



Washington: 

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Virginia: 

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Maryland: 

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CAMERAS* PHOTO A MOVIE SUPPLIES] 



//Ikjow, whom," asked the Sunday 
1^1 school teacher, "do you suppose 
the beautiful Egytian princess found 
to take care of the little boy she had 
found in the bullrushes?" 

Without hesitation, a College Park 
terpette chortled, "A baby sitter." 

* * * 

A teacher was telling her third-grade 

students where the Germans could be 
found, the French, the Italian, the Eng- 
lish, etc. "And where do the Irish come 
from?" she asked. "From Notre 
Dame!" came the answer, "and we wish 
they'd play the Terps!" 

* * * 

Sign at a movie: "While They Last. 
Good Old Fashioned Flat Movies." 

* * * 

She used to be the belle of Hyatts- 
ville but somebody tolled on her. 

* # * 

Him: "I suppose you're angry be- 
cause I came home last night with a 
black eye?" 

Her: "When you came home you 
didn't have the black eye." 

* * * 

Li'l Elmer was a soft hearted kiddie. 
Watching the scene in Quo Vadis where 
the lions devour the Christians, Li'l 
Elmer began to sob, explaining, "That 
poor little lion at the left ain't gettin' 
any!" 

Geography subject was "Africa" 
"What," asked the teacher, "is ivory 
used for?" Came the reply from deep 
left field/To make soap to advertise 
TV shows." 

The choirmaster instructed, "Watch 
this now. When the tenors reach 'the 
gates of Hell' all the sopranos come 
in." 

* * * 

A woman's hardest work is keeping 
up the fiction that it's never done. 

* * * 

Some people thirst after knowledge, 
some after fame, some after money — 
but everybody thirsts after pretzels. 

* * * 

Congress may do something about 
"hidden taxes." Mebbe even hide them 
better. 

* * * 

When spring is here you'll surely know 

'Cause a rummy schnozzle tells yon so. 

* * * 

One of our coeds was batting away 
on the stairway. A cop came to the 
door with, "We've had a complaint 
that a guy named Wagner was being 

murdered here." 

... ... ... 

Coach. Cronin: "No, use your bras- 

Riverdale Rose', "I don't wear any in 

this hot weather." 



There once was a girl named Harris, 
Whom nothing could ever embarrass 

'Till the bath salts one day, 

In the tub where she lay 
Turned out to be plaster of Paris. 

* * * 

"A" has one dollar, "B" has one 
dollar. They swap. Each lias one dollar. 

"A" has an idea. "B" has an idea. 
They swap. Each has two ideas. 

* * * 

Smoky had a horrible dream. 
Dreamed he was with three thousand 
beautiful girls; one thousand blondes, 
one thousand brunettes, one thousand 
red heads. What made the dream hor- 
rible was that Smoky dreamed he was 

one of the girls too. 

* * * 

"Oh, mother) may I take a swim?" 
"Why not, my darling daughter, 
You're so near naked anyhow 

You're safer in the water." 

* * * 

A pessimist is a person who would 
commit suicide if he could do it with- 
out killing himself. 

* * * 

A wolf is a man who enjoys life, 
liberty and the happiness of pursuit. 

A pat on the back develops char- 
acter — if administered young enough, 
often enough, and low enough. 

* * * 

Sugar puss (age 5) : "What are you 
putting on your face, Muzzy?" 

Muzzy: "This white cream is sup- 
posed to make me beautiful." 

Sugar puss: "It doesn't work, does 

it?" 

* * * 

People sometimes grow so broad- 
minded that their thinking gets shal- 
low. 

* * * 

Farmer: "Sarie, now that we've 
struck oil I want you to have some de- 
cent clothes." 

Sarie: "Tee worn decent clothes all 
iny life. Now I'm going to dress like 
other women!" 

(Just like downtown, eh.) 




"Somehow or other these newly arrived 

freshmen all look alike, to met" 



42 



'Maryland" 



Normandy 
Farm 



LUNCHEONS 

COCKTAILS 

DINNER 

Open Every Day 
from 12:30 to 10 p. m 



POTOMAC, MD. 

From Baltimore: Edmond- 
son Ave. lo Rl. 29 to 
Norbeck; Rt. 28 to Rock- 
ville; Rt. 189 live miles. 

MARJORY HENDRICKS 

Oliver 2-9421 
Poplar 2-3964 



DANZER 
METAL WORKS 

COMPANY 

SHEET METAL 
SPECIALISTS 

Hagerstown, Md. 

PHONE 1818 



J. 


B. 


FERGUSON & CO. 

ENGINEERS 
CONSTRUCTORS 




HAGERSTOWN, MD. 




Dietrich & Gambrill, Inc. 

Frederick, Md. 

A Maryland Institution 



ANTIQUES bought and sold 

MRS. H. A. PICKERING 

URBANA, MD. 

formerly 5201 Wisconsin Ave., Washington 

Phone: Buckeyestown 4223 

OPEN EVENINGS & SUNDAYS 

Route 240 — 6 miles South of Frederick 



Crown Oil & Wax Co. 

Distributors 

Shell Petroleum Products 

Phone MONUMENT 3-6381 

FREDERICK, MD. 



Frederick Underwriters 

Incorporated 

General Insurance Agents 

EVERY KIND OF INSURANCE 

110 W. Patrick St. • Frederick, Md. 



"I can't hear you, dear," said the 

mother as the tiny terpette whispered 
her good night prayer. 

"I wasn't talking to you," replied the 
tiny terpette. 

* * * 

Thai noise down the street? .1 good 
snappy driver tried to turn n corner 

on tWO whirls. Tin ri n-ns no form r. 



Recruit, "Doctor, I have a pain here." 

Doctor, "In the Army, son, officers 

have abdomens, sergeantB have 

stomachs; yon have a belly ache." 



The little old lady wanted to buy a 

store the hotshot salesynan told her 
about noncorroding bolts and patented 
insulation and the thick gauge of the 
metal and about tricky gadgets and 
combustion chambers. When the sales- 
man stopped to get his breath she asked 
"Will it keep two old ladies warm?" 



To watch some auto drivers you'd 
think they owned their cars. 



A chicken is more tender hearted 
after being stewed. 

* * * 

Dogs in Kamchatka are the fastest 
in the world because the trees are so 
apart in Kamchatka. 



Milton Berle had just finished a show 
for Vets in a hospital. As he left he 
waved, "Hope you're better soon, 
boys." A chorus replied, "We hope you 
will be too!" 



Education can consist of unlearning. 

* * * 

// the thought of work fails to dis- 
courage you — you have the makings of 
a good man. 



VICTOR 

CUSHWA 

& SONS 

Manufacturers of 

"CALVERT" 

COLONIAL FACE 

BRICK 

Main Office and Plant 
WILLIAMSPORT, MD. 

Office and Warehouse 

137 INGRAHAM ST., N.E. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

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General Offices 

Lime Kiln 
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PHONES 
Monument 3-3104 
Buckeystown 3511 



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BANK 


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Phone 312 


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PHONE: 1255 



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MIDNIGHT OIL 

(Concluded train Page 8) 

edge of the German language. In 
all our sessions we have a big map 
of Germany in front of the class. No 
place name, no river, no mountain is 
mentioned without being pointed out 
on the map. Thus the student will 
gradually learn some German geog- 
raphy without exerting particular ef- 
fort to do so. We attempt to give a 
complete survey of the development 
of German history, from the first ap- 
pearance of the Germans on the stage 
of time until the present; a survey 
of German history from Arminius to 
Adenauer. 

This is no easy undertaking. Most 
of the soldiers and air men know very 
little of European, less of German 
history. A few names float in their 
minds, Martin Luther, Wallenstein, 
Frederick the Great, Bismarck. Usual- 
ly their knowledge is limited to the 
realization that they had "something" 
to do with German history, "but don't 
ask me what." Here we try to build 
up, to lay bare the anatomy of Ger- 
man history, to show the gifts and 
shortcomings, the tremendous potenti- 
alities and the latent dangers of this 
nation with which we have been at 
war twice within one generation. We 
try to show that in history there is 
nothing as simple as a clear black or 
white, but only different shades of 
gray, that there is an almost lawful 
causality behind German history; that 
there are certain reasons why one 
event leads to another in the course 
of two thousand years of German his- 
tory. 

More Interpretation 

The past twenty years have not al- 
ways been conducive to an objective 
and impartial evaluation of history. 
Newspaper columnists, editorial writers 
and self appointed "German experts" 
have frequently given a rather one- 
sided, distorted picture of German his- 
tory. A balanced interpretation of 
historical events needs more time than 
is usually allotted to a harrassed news- 
paper writer pounding his typewriter 
in the few minutes between the arrival 
of the latest news and the deadline for 
his copy. Here we try to correct a 
few of the distortions and miscon- 
ceptions grown in the tropical climate 
of hate and hostilities. Bismarck can- 
not be dismissed with the simple label 
of "a reactionary", Frederick of Prus- 
sia was more than just "a militarist", 
to mention only a few of such "pro- 
found" observations and pseudo-his- 
torical interpretations of recent vint- 
age. 

After we have outlined the political 
background of a certain period of 
German history we try to show the 
cultural achievements of the century, 
the philosophy, literature, art and 
music and all those intellectual and 
artistic manifestations which somehow 
reveal the "pulse of time." We put 




OVER THE NECKAR 

The Karl Theodore bridge at Heidelberg, 
across the Nevkar Riierfl a tributary of the 
Rhine. 



special emphasis on the inter-relation- 
ship of social and literary history. 
Needless to say that we try to inte- 
grate into all this the colorful folk- 
lore of the country, to point out and 
to explain the habits and customs of 
the people. I think it is a credit to 
both parties concerned, American oc- 
cupation forces and German native 
population, that in recent years the 
post-war friction of 1945-48 has stead- 
ily decreased and has been replaced 
by a friendly cooperation. Prere- 
quisite to such a cooperation is the 
wish for mutual understanding. To 
promote this understanding, to inter- 
pret the complex German reality in 
which so many questions receive their 
answers from the manifold strata of 
German history, this is the primary 
objective of our German Civilization 
course taught in the Maryland Mid- 
night Oil Centers between Bremer- 
haven, Wiesbaden, and Fuerstenfeld- 
bruck. If occasionally we tried to en- 
liven the course through an evening 
of German folksongs with a moderate 
sampling of Rhein Wine or Bavarian 
beer, we realized that we did not 
strictly remain within the necessities 
and prerequisites of the A & S cata- 
logue, but we listed that under the 
headings "extra curriculum, applied 
folklore and field trips." 



THORNDYKE 




"Remember, it'* not to be our speed against 
their brawn. They outweigh us a quarter oj 
a pound per man, on the average, end to 
end." 



44 



"Maryland" 





Allendorfer — Johnson 

Heiene Beaujon Allendorfer to Lt. 
Col. Grove C. Johnson, Maryland 
Graduate, Sigma Nu. 

Ames — Huyett 
Joyce Elaine Ames, Maryland stu- 
dent, Sigma Kappa, to John B. Hu- 
yett, Maryland graduate, Pi Kappa 
Alpha, Alpha Phi Omega. 

Baddock — Mandel 
Aileen Baddock, Maryland graduate, 
to Elias Mandel. 

Baird — Sorg 
Janet E. Baird, Maryland alumna, to 
William Stuart Sorg, Jr. 

Becker — Mendelsohn 
Barbara Sheila Becker to Max L. 
Mendelsohn, Maryland Pharmacy stu- 
dent. 

Berlage — Frederick 
Both Maryland students. Beverly 
Anslijm Berlage, Alpha Chi Omega, to 
Carl L. Frederick, Jr., Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon. 

Bradford — Gladding 
Ellen Elizabeth Bradford, Maryland 
graduate, to Herbert Coston Gladding. 
Braff — Grollman 
Elaine Braff, to Rabbi Jerome W. 
Grollman, Maryland graduate, Phi 
Kappa Phi, and Phi Eta Sigma. 
Carl — Schermerhorn 
Eleanor Lane Carl, Maryland alum- 
na, to William R. Schermerhorn. 
Crowder — Jones 
Elizabeth Pearl Crowder to George 
F. Jones, Jr., Maryland alumnus. 
Davis — Pierce 
Lillian Rae Davis, senior in Physical 
Education, Delta 
Gamma, to Ronald 
H. Pierce, (B&PA 
'53), Delta Sigma 
Phi. Miss Davis 
recently returned 
from a year in Eu- 
rope. Mr. Pierce 
was President of 
the S. G. A. and 
the Inter frater- 
nity Council. Upon 
graduation he re- 
»'. ceived the Citizen- 

,, ,,. ship award and the 

Mr. fierce •»«• , T ^ 

Men s League Cup, 

the two highest awards. 

Ehrlich— Shor 

Roslyn Ehrlich, Maryland alumna, 

to Nathan Shor. 

Ferber — Weiner 

Ann Ferber, Maryland student, to 

Philip Weiner. 

Ford — Ayres 

Catherine Harrison Ford, Maryland 

graduate, Kappa Delta, to Lt. Col. 



MARGARETTE WEIRICH -«■—-* 

Robert R. Ayres, Jr., I'SMC, Maryland 

Alumnus, Theta Chi, 

Fresen — Whitnej 
Nancy Ann Fresen, Maryland alum- 
na, Delta Delta Delta, to James 11. 
Whitney, alumnus of Maryland and of 




Maryland School of Law. 
Getz — Kravitz 
Vivian Lee Getz, Maryland graduate, 
Omicron Nu, to Dr. Irvin M. Kravitz. 
Gill— Miller 
Betty Gill, Maryland alumna, to 
.James R. Miller, a member of the 
Maryland Bar Association. 

Grimes — DeVinney 
Both Maryland alumni, Mary Janet 
Grimes, Alpha Delta Pi, to Vernon K. 
DeVinney, Delta Kappa Epsilon and 
National Collegiate Players. 
Hillock — Railey 
June Ann Hillock, to Clayton Allen 
Railey, Jr., both Maryland alumni. 
Harding — Dodson 
Elizabeth Gay Harding, Alpha Chi 
Omega, to Wilmer L. Dodson, Alpha 
Gamma Rho, both Maryland students. 
Johnson — Young 
Charlotte Anne Johnson, alumna, 
school of Pharmacy to John C. Young. 
Karmason — Spritz 
Dr. Marilyn Karmason to Dr. Nort- 
ton Spritz Maryland graduate. 
Kaye — Blank 
Elaine Lois Kaye, to Raymond M. 
Blank, Maryland student. 
Keller — Hudson 
Cornelia Ann Keller, to Fred S. 
Hudson, Maryland student. 

Kirstein — Alexander 
Adrienne Rita Kirstein, Maryland 
senior, to Edward Alexander. 

Kirkpatrick — MacFarlane 
Jean Kirkpatrick, Maryland alumna, 
to Douglass A. MacFarlane, Maryland 
graduate. 

Kirkpatrick — Rareshide 
Sheila Kirkpatrick, Maryland alum- 
na, to John H. Rareshide. 

Konigsberg — Brady 
Florence Konigsberg, Maryland grad- 
uate, to Norman Brody. 

Lakeman — Aylward 
Mary Louise Lakeman Maryland 
graduate to Thomas J. Aylward. 
Levy — Km U.i 
Joan Levy, Maryland senior, to 
Alfred Kurka. 

Lignelli — Con w ay 
Margaret Concetta Lignelli to James 
C. Conwav, Jr., Maryland alumus, 
U.S.A. 

Lipman — Smilow 
Joan Heiene Lipman, Maryland stu- 
dent, Alpha Epsilon Phi, to Joel E. 
Smilow. 

Lohr — Beebe 
Betty Jean Lohr, Maryland student. 
Delta Delta Delta, to Pvt. Don Scott 
Beebe, U.S.A., Maryland alumnus, Sig- 
ma Alpha Epsilon, 



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61S SOUTH DIVISION 
SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



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SALISBURY, MD. 
POCOMOKE CITY, MD. 



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FEED 

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EASTON, Ml>. 
Phone 714 




Lynde — Leech 
Sally Ann Lynde, Kappa Alpha 
Theta. to Wade Rigby Leech, Delta 
Tau Delta, both Maryland students. 

Magill — Frady 
Blanche Ida Magill to Roger Frady, 
Maryland students. 

McCloud — Hardesty 

Carolyn Catherine McCloud, to Lt. 
Edwin L. Hardesty, Jr., U.S.A.F., 
Maryland alumnus. 

Newborn — Mahler 
Myrna Elaine Newborn, to Ivan E. 
Mahler, Maryland student. 

Ottenheimer — Lowenson 

Mary Ann Ottenheimer, to Richard 
Lowenson, Jr., Maryland alumnus. 

Polovoy — Prigal 

Eleanor Polovoy to Arnold Prigal, 
Maryland graduate, Beta Alpha, Psi 
and Alpha Epsilon Pi. 

Ritter-Stahr 

Both Maryland Alumni, Mary Phyl- 
lis Ritter, Alpha Xi Delta, to Rome 
C. Stahr, now in the Navy in the 
Pacific. 

Rogers — Reahl 

Anne Cullen Rogers, to G. Edward 
Reahl, Jr., Maryland School of Medi- 
cine. 

Roos — Mullinix 
Phyllis Jean Roos, Maryland alumna, 
to Thomas Price Mullinix, Maryland 
student. 

Segal — Bernstein 

Johann Marcia Segal, to Leonard 
Bernstein, Maryland Law School grad- 
uate. 

Smith— Herbst 

Marion Smith to Harry Herbst, 
Maryland graduate, now attending 
school of Medicine, Alpha Epsilon Pi 
and Phi Delta Epsilon. 

Somervell — Moore 
Jean Courtney Somervell to John D. 
Moore, Maryland graduate. 

Spiegel — Roberts 

Eleanor Spiegel, Maryland student, 
to Morton C. Roberts, ex-U.S.M.C. 

St raus — Bresler 

Alma Flour Straus, to Charles S. 
Bresler, Maryland alumnus. 

Taishoff — Eichberg 

Jacquelyn Dawn Taishoff to Lieut. 
William S. Eichberg, USAF, Maryland 
graduate. 

Watkins — Julian 

Shirley Ann Watkins, to H. William 
Julian, Maryland student. 

White— Wallace 

Elizabeth Love White, Tri-Delta 
senior, to midshipman Dallas L. Wal- 
lace, U. S. N. '54. 

Wilson — Thompson 

Juliana DuBois Wilson, Maryland 
alumna, to William L. Thompson. 




*9* 



V3loiiom J-^arade 



Addison — Vinella 

Jean Netty Vinella, Maryland alumna, 
Alpha Xi Delta, to Edwin S. Addi- 
son, Jr. 

Arata — Allen 
Cecelia Clark Allen, Delta Delta Del- 
ta, Maryland graduate to Theo. B. 
Arata. 

Besett — Byrnes 
Mary Cathemine Byrnes (Nursing, 
'46), to Harry L. Besett, Jr. 
Bowen — Wagner 
Irma Besse Wagner, to 1st Lt. Geo. 
C. Bowen, Jr., USAF, Sigma Chi, both 
Maryland graduates. 

Burka — Levy 
Joan Levy, Maryland student, to 
Alfred Burka. 

Caplan — Weddel 
Bonnie Dale Weddel to Reuben N. 
Caplan, Maryland alumnus. 
Carr — Linker 
Katherine Price Linker, Maryland 
alumna, to Dr. Dodd Stewart Carr. 
Chado — Coonin 
Diane Coonin, Maryland alumna, to 
Sam Chado. 

Cigledy — Michels 
Ruth Marie Michels, Maryland alum- 
na, to Richard S. Cigledy. 
Cook— North 
Janis Elizabeth North, Maryland 
alumna, Kappa Kappa Gamma, to Jo- 
seph Allen Cook, Maryland alumnus, 
Alpha Tau Omega. 

Coulbourne — Gregorius 
Wanda E. Gregorius (Nursing, '51), 
to Richard Coulbourne, Jr. 
Cramer — Wiles 
Joyce Virginia Mae Wiles, Mary- 
land alumns, to John B. Cramer. 
Crane — Rubenstein 
Ruth Sylvia Rubenstein, Maryland 
alumna, to Michael J. Crane, Jr., 
U.S.C.G. 

Custer — Creeger 
Sarah Ann Creeger, Maryland grad- 
uate, to Kenneth Reed Custer, U.S.A. F., 
Maryland almunus. 

Daggit — Cullen 
Darla Lee Cullen, Maryland alumna, 
to Lt. Edward A. Daggit, U.S.A. 
DiManna — Amoss 
Virginia E. Amoss, Maryland grad- 
uate, to Daniel DiManna. 

Fahey — Pugliese 
Louise Rose Pugliese to Thomas F. 
Fahey, Maryland alumnus. 
Fendrick — Cooper 
Barbara Johnson Cooper, to John 
James Fendrick, Maryland alumnus. 
Fischer- — Lee 
Betty Ernestine Lee, Maryland 
Alumna, to Ens. David H. Fischer, 
U. S. N. 

Flanagan — Barnard 
Elizabeth Barnard, to Robert Flana- 
gan, Maryland graduate. 

Flanagan — O'Donoghue 
Mary Margaret O'Donoghue, to 
James Driscoll Flanagan, Maryland 
graduate. 



46 



"Maryland" 



Fon tana — LaCarvera 
Laura LaCarvera, to Michael Fon- 
tana, Maryland alumnus. 
Fox — Oberfeld 
(Jerry Ilene Oberfeld, Maryland 
alumna, Sigma Delta Tau, and Alpha 
Lambda Delta, to Ensign Stanley Lloyd 
Fox. 

Fuller — Hackenberg 
Shirley Anne Hackenberg (Nursing, 
'51), to Joseph Fuller. 

Gauld — Moore 
Ruth Carolyn Moore, to John Ross 
(iauld, Maryland medical student. 
Graham — -Robberts 
Mary Ann Robberts, to Lt. William 
Ragan Graham, U.S.A.F., Maryland 
graduate. 

Grimaldi— DelRe 
Jeanette DelRe, to Saverio John 
Grimaldi, Maryland graduate. 
Jacobson — Berger 
Rita Roe Berger, to Jerome Jacob- 
son, Maryland alumnus. 
Hayes — Frost 
Jane Lee Frost, to Eldridge Hayes, 
Maryland Alumnus, Phi Sigma Kappa. 
Hruska — Hines 
Ada Ruthellen Hines (Nursing, '47), 
to Mr. Kenneth H. Hruska. 
Kelly — Young 
Both Maryland students, Miriam Cor- 
nelia Young, to Howard H. Kelly, Jr., 
Phi Kappa Tau. 

Lee — Walters 
Serena Margaret Walters, to Robert 
E. Lee, Maryland alumnus. 
Lewis — Green 
Vala Maxine Green, to Basil Charles 
Lewis, Jr., Maryland alumnus, Tau 
Beta Pi. 

Long — Schriver 
Norma Schriver (Nursing, '49), to 
Charles E. Long. 

Louder — Sinninger 
Mary Kay Sinninger, Maryland 
alumna, Alpha Xi Delta, to Robert 
Dale Louder. 

Maddox — Scott 

Marlita Rae Scott, Maryland alumna, 
Delta, to William L. Maddox, Maryland 
student, Sigma Chi. 

Martin — Brinson 

Edith Lucille Brinson, Maryland 
graduate, to John Oliver Martin. 
McGuire— Hall 

Emily Barton Hall, Maryland grad- 
uate, to Lt. Arthur Bradford McGuire, 
U.S.A. 

Naden — Rosenberg 
Joy Charlene Rosenberg, to Paul 
Naden, both Maryland students. 
Porter — Galton 
Matilda Jean Galton (Nursing, '52), 
to Calvin R. Porter, U.S.A.F. 

Peterson — Lank 

Jean Davis Lank, Maryland student, 
Tri Delta, to Kent A. Peterson. 
Quinn — Meise 
Margaret M. Meise, to Ralph M. 
Quinn, Jr., Maryland sophomore. 
Robey — Farren 
Sarah Anne Farren, Maryland alum- 
na, to George V. Robey, George Wash- 
ington senior, World War II Navy 
veteran. 

Rutkowski — Garrison 
Mary Mae Garrison, Maryland grad- 



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President, Chas. D. Brlddell, Class ol 1935 



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ESTABLISHED 1921 
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Heating - Ventilating - Air Conditioning 
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Telephones : Day 555 - Night 3789 



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DUNCAN BROTHERS, INC. 

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"First In Service Because We Put Servic* First" 

Telephones 255 - 455 - 655 

POCOMOKE CITY, MARYLAND 



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47 



Howard at Saratoga, Balto. 1, Md. 
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Call Ann Joyce Saratoga 7-3000 




KLOMAN 

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Surgical Instruments 

Hospital & Physicians 

Supplies 

907 Cathedral St. LE. 9-2912 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

1822 Eye St., N.W. NA. 8-6566 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 



James Posey & Associates 

Consulting Engineers 

10 E. PLEASANT ST. 
Baltimore 2, Md. 



LUDWIG 
KATZENSTEIN 

202 W. PRATT ST. 
BALTIMORE 1, MD. 
SAratoga 7-0748 



picture frames 

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restoring 



uate, Sigma Kappa, to Seaman Edward 
S. Rutkowski, U.S.N., USS Coral Sea. 

Schwab — Hilton 

Shirley Muriel Hilton, to Robert 
Harvey Schwab, Maryland alumnus. 

Siggins — Whalen 
Nancy Lee Whalen to Gene P. Sig- 
gins, Maryland alumnus. 

Smith — Bloxom 

Nellie Mae Bloxom, graduate Mary- 
land school of nursing, to Martin 
Jerome Smith, Maryland alumnus, Kap- 
pa Alpha. 

Showalter — Worth 

Janet Goodwin Worth to John Sho- 
walter, Maryland student. 

Scott— Twilley 

Both Maryland graduates, Mary 
Claggett Twilley, Alpha Delta Pi, 
Omicron Nu and Pi Delta Epsilon, to 
Philip A. Scott. 

Vendemia — Hill 

Lucille Hill, to Ralph J. Vendemia, 
Jr., Maryalnd graduate. 

Wattenberg — Marans 

Frances Marans, to Leonard Watten- 
berg, Maryland alumnus. 

Wellante — Joneckis 

Mary Joneckis (Nursing, '47), to 
Mr. Frank Wellante. 



ITSY BITSY *j|R ! 

New Arrival In Texas 

Her name is Laura Stephanie. Her 
mother is the former Laura C. Cole- 
man of Baltimore. Her father is 1st 
Lt. David H. R. Loughrie, TJSAF, (Col- 
lege of Law, '48), now stationed at 
Laughlin AFB, Del Rio, Texas. 

Two Home Ec. Babies 

Suzi Miller Whittle and Charles, Jr., 
announce the arrival of Charles E. 
Whittle, III, September 19. 

Ruth Ellen Ifert Burrier and John 
announce the arrival of a baby girl, 
October 6. 

Nursery School Babies 

To Mr. and Mrs. Paul Russell, a 
daughter, Paula Kay, on February 26, 
1953. Mrs. Russell was Maxine Mc- 
Graw, Class 1951. 

To Mr. and Mrs. James P. Nichols, 
a son, Patrick, Jr., on July 12, 1953. 
Mrs. Nichols was Martha H. Gasser, 
Class 1948. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Paul S. Soteropulos, 
a son, Stephen John in June 1953. Mrs. 
Soteropulos, was Sally Shores, Class 
1946. 

To Mr. and Mrs. John R. Kohlhafer, 
a son, Dennis John, on July 30, 1953. 
Mrs. Kohlhafer was Frances E. Ker- 
shner, Class 1947. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd C. Windsor, 
a son, Jeffrey, on November 12, 1952. 
Mrs. Windsor was Jeanne Rose Snyder, 
Class 1950. 

To Dr. and Mrs. John M. Dennis, a 




Swartz 




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48 



"Maryland' 



son, James M., Junior, on August 25, 
1953. Mrs. Dennis was Mary Helen 
France, Class 1947. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Michael Ostrosky, 
a son, Thomas Michael, on September 
18, 1953. Mrs. Ostrosky was Florence 
Floryan, Class 1947. 

To Mr. and Mrs. lioslcy ('. Tawney, 
Jr., a son, Scott, on August 22, L958. 
Mrs. Tawney was Barbara H. Muzzy, 
Class 1950. ' 

Mr. and Mrs. Rogers ,) . Starsoneck, 
a son Rogers James, Jr., on August 25, 
1953. Mrs. Starsoneck was Ruth S. 
Haslup, Class 1952. 

To Mr. and Mrs. John J. Robinson, 
a daughter, Dorothy Kay, on Oct. 4th 
(5th), 1953. Mrs. Robinson was Marion 
Eva McClure, Class 1952. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Lamar Ray- 
burn, a son, Charles Lamar, on Nov. 2, 
1953. Mrs. Rayburn was Flaine Glea- 
son, Class 1950. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Win. H. Mosberg, 
Jr., a son, Stephen Randall, onOct. 12, 
1953. Mrs. Mosberg was Barbara J. 
Garrison, Class 1946. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward V. Rowan, a 
daughter, Deborah, on Sept. 1, 1953. 
Mrs. Rowan was Mary B. Phelps, Class 
1950. 

To Dr. and Mrs. E. Burl Randolph, 
a son, Edward Burl, Jr., on April 4, 
1953. Dr. and Mrs. Randolph have two 
daughters, Pamela and Mary Cynthia, 
and they are mighty proud of their 
family. Mrs. Randolph was Mary Kirk, 
Class 1945. 

To M/Sgt., and Mrs. Charles G. 
Morgan, a son, John Frederick, on Oc- 
tober 10th, 1953. Mrs. Morgan was 
Anne C. Lutz, Class 1946. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Raymond C. Spauld- 
ing, Jr., a daughter, Martha Lucinda, 
on Nov. 1, 1953. Mrs. Sapulding was 
Doris A. Swartz, Class 1947. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Boulmatis, 
a son, Lewis Alexander, on May 8, 1952. 
Mrs. Boulmatis was Georgia Rosus, 
Class 1947. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Robert N. Lucke, 
a daughter, Susanne, on July 27, 1953. 
They have a daughter, Jennifier, two 
and one half years old. Mrs. Lucke was 
Loiuse Selena Klaring, Class 1947. 





CALL VErnon 7-9410 

Closed Mondays and 

Christmas Day 

Open II A.M. - 11 P.M. 

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cHapH 



Omar Crothers 

State Senator Omar Crothers died in 
the courthouse at Elkton while ad- 
dressing a jury. He was under treat- 
ment for a heart condition. 

Crothers, 44, was making his first 
appearance in the courthouse in several 
weeks, his activities having been lim- 
ited by his illness. 

He paused in his remarks to the jury, 
moved as if to step forward, then 
slumped to the floor. 

Rushed to the hospital, he lived only 
a few minutes afterwards. 

Crothers was born in Elkton, at- 
tended public schools here and grad- 
uated from the University of Mary- 
land in 1929 and the University's 
School of law in 1933. 

He was elected to the Senate in 1950 
and served in the General Assembly's 
advisory body, the Legislative Council. 
He was chairman of the Senate Judi- 
ciary Committee. Crothers served as 
chairman of the State Board of Correc- 
tion from August, 1946, until May, 
1947. He was a member of the board 
of directors of the Elkton Banking 
and Trust Co. 

Omar ("Gus") Crothers, was a star 
guard on Maryland's football team 
under coach "Curley" Byrd. Bill Hot- 
tel, distinguished University sports 
historian, selected Crothers on his first 
string all-time Maryland team and 
wrote, "He came from the sticks, with- 
out grid experience, and became great. 
Tt would be difficult to find a more 
rugged and efficient guard." 

Anna Carlyle Lutz 

With the death on October 7, 1953, 
of Mrs. John Francis Lutz, the Nurses' 
Alumnae Association lost one of its 
most loyal and faithful members. 

Born Anna Carlyle Robinson, she 
was a graduate of the 1917 class and 
from student days was always af- 
fectionately known as "Bobby". 

She served overseas with the Army 
Nurse Corps in World War I. While 
on duty with the U. S. Army Base 
Hospital No. 69 at Savenay, France, 
she was selected to nurse Miss Jane 
A. Delone, Director of Nurses, Amer- 
ican National Red Cross, in what was 
Miss Delano's last illness and was 



entrusted afterwards with delivering 
Miss Delano's papers and personal 
possession to National Headquarters 
in Washington, D. C. 

In 1921 Miss Robinson was married 
to Dr. John Francis Lutz, a 1914 grad- 
uate of the University of Maryland 
School of Medicine, now Professor of 
Histology there. 

Miss Lutz is survived by a daughter, 
Mrs. Charles G. Morgan of Durham, 
N. C, (who followed in her mother's 
steps, graduated from the School of 
Nursing in 1946). Mrs. Morgan has 
a son, John Frederick Morgan, born 
in Durham on October 10, 1953. 

In 1941 Mrs. Lutz returned to the 
University Hospital, in charge of the 
Dressing Room on the Operating Floor, 
iii which position she served until her 
death. 

Throughout her years Mrs. Lutz 
lived by her Christian ideals. Her 
charm was instantly impressive, her 
voice gentle and soothing, her blue 
eyes twinkling. Association with her 
always gave encouragement and stimu- 
lation to others. 

Besides having been active as a 
member and officer of the Nurses' 
Alumnae Association, Mrs. Lutz was 
a member of the Women's Guild of 
St. Bartholomew's Protestant Episco- 
pal Church, Baltimore, and a member 
of The Woman's Club of Ten Hills. 

Funeral services were held October 
12, 1953, in St. Bartholomew's Church, 
the Rev. Jack Malpas officiating. Burial 
was in Arlington National Cemetery. 

School of Nursing 

Roby, Frances Marion, Class 1896, on 

June 1, 1953. 
Cavano, Adeline Belle, (Mrs. Fred C. 

Smith) Class 1917, on June 10, 1953. 
Brownell, Edith M., Class 1913, on 

May 13, 1953. 

James W. Eby 

James Walter Eby, 43, agricultural 
agent of Queen Anne's County since 
1943, died at University Hospital. 

A resident of Centerville, he was 
president of the Maryland State Coun- 
ty Agents Association. Mr Eby was 
born in Sabillasville, Frederick Coun- 
ty. He graduated from the Univer- 
sity of Maryland in 1932. 

Survivors include his wife and two 
daughters, his mother, Mrs. Roy Eby, 
Sabillasville, and two sisters, Mrs. 
Frank Cummings, Silver Spring, and 
Mrs. Clyde Gray, Sabillasville. 

Angel V. Aviles, M.D. 

Dr. Angel V. Aviles, (MD '12), a 
native of Ecuador, cfied on October 
25th, 1953, at his residence in New 
York City. He began as a general 
practitioner in 1918, served at the De- 
partment of Health, St. Bartholomeus 
clinic, Pan American Hospital and lec- 
tured on Urology, Polyclinic Medical 
School. He was a member of Hispano 
Medical Society, Inc., belonged to the 
Medical Society, County of New York 
and was an Honorary Member of the 
Military Surgeons, U.S.A. 

Surviving Dr. Aviles are his wife, 
Rose Isabel Hartlieb Aviles, and three 
sisters in Quito, Ecuador. 



50 



"Maryland" 



TERPS, NATIONAL CHAMPIONS 

(Continued from Page 7) 
derful material in the fine boys on 
the squad and that each showed a 
wonderful team spirit. They deserve 
the highest praise and commenda- 
tion. 

"But without detracting anything 
from them, we all know that all of 
this would have gone for naught with- 
out the grand devotion, high knowl- 
edge of the game and magnificent 
coaching ability of yourself. 

"You not only developed, sharpened 

and maintained the skill and spirit 

of the players, but you imparted your 

own good qualities of leadership to 

i your very able assistants. 

"As governor, as a citizen, and as 
an alumnus, I send you may thanks 
and congratulations." 

The Star's Stann 
The following is from "Win, Lose or 
Draw," Francis Stann's column in the 
Washington Star: — 

Dr. H. C. (Curley) Byrd, the college 
president who rose from the coaching 
bench, will go along with the praise- 
for-Tatum program. "It was a beauti- 
ful job," Dr. Byrd said "Tatum can 
coach, there's no doubt about it. I 
knew it back in 1946, when I first 
wanted to hire him." 

One who was talking to Dr. Byrd 
said, "I didn't know you and Tatum 
had talked in 1946." 

"Very few people did know," Dr. 
Byrd said, "but I gues it's all right 
to talk about it now." 

"First," Dr. Byrd went on to say, 
"he knows football. You can't coach if 
you don't know your business. But 
coaching requires more than mere 
knowledge. 

"I'll say this about Tatum. First, 
he's the best organizer I know. Sec- 
ond, Jim gets more out of his men 
during the time he has to spend with 
them than anybody I know. 

"Third, he has the ability to create 
confidence in individuals. That, to me, 
is the real secret of coaching. He 
makes players know they can do some- 
thing, although originally a boy might 
have had serious misgivings. He's one 
of the best at that. I'll say he's the 
best at it. 

Actually, Dr. Byrd was cognizant of 
Tatum's existence long before Jim's 
days as assistant coach at North Caro- 
lina and Cornell. "I'm not going to 
say I spotted him as a future head 
coach when he was a player," Dr. Byrd 
said, "but I knew there was a Jim 
Tatum when he was tackle for North 
Carolina. A good one, too. A big, 
serious kid who loved the game. You 
could tell it." 

"There's another asset he's got," 
Dr. Byrd added. "Tatum works at 
his job. He'll spend 15 hours a day 



working. A lot of coaches will put 
in a five-hour day and think it's 
enough. Not Tatum. Fortunately for 
him, Jim's a big, rugged fellow who 
can work 24 hours at a stretch, if 
necessary. 

"You know where he not the habit? 
From Carl Suavely. At least, I think 
so. First, Tatum or any other coach 
has to love football. If a coach doesn't 
love the game, he shouldn't try to 
make a living at it. Suavely was a 
worker. I don't say that Carl was 
the best coach, but I didn't see many 
others who worked as hard and long." 

Before Tatum came to Maryland 
there had never been an All-American 
Terrapin. In Kx-Coach Byrd'a day, 
Maryland manpower was short. But 
almost every time Dr. Byrd dedicates 
a new building . . . and he counts a 
day lost when ground isn't being 
broken . . . Tatum tries to keep pace 
with an Ail-American. 

Victory Parade 

Tatum's Truculent Terps are to be 
honored jointly by the Touchdown 
Club and the Washington Board of 
Trade at a luncheon at the Statler. 

Some 1500 are expected to turn out 
with Board of Trade President Harry 
L. Merrick and Touchdown Club Presi- 
dent Joe Lynch as M.C's. 

President Byrd, will be a guest of 
honor. Other notables invited to sit 
at the head table include Governors 
Theodore R. McKeldin of Maryland 
and Johnson Murray of Oklahoma. 

A parade from Ninth and K nw., to 
the Statler featuring the Maryland 
football players, representatives of 
both sponsoring organizations, and 
Maryland's band and drum majorettes 
will precede the luncheon. 

LN.S. Ratings 

The International News Service, fol- 
lowing Maryland's win over 'Bama, 
rank it first ten like this: 

1— MARYLAND (10-0) 

2 — Notre Dame (8-0-1) 
3 — Michigan State (8-1) 

4 I'CLA IN 1 I 

."> — Oklahoma (8-1-1) 

ii — Illinois (7-1-1) 

7 — Georgia Tech ts-2-1 1 

8 Army (711) 
9— Rice (8-2) 
10 — Texas (7-3) 

U.P. Rankings 

United Press final ranks are as fol- 
lows: 



for banquets 

parties 

special meetings 



First place in 


m ron th 


l- 


MARYLAND 


(20) 


2- 


Nut re Dame 


, 1 3 i 


3- 


Michigan State 1 1 i 


4- 


-UCLA Hi 




rr 


-Oklahoma 




8- 


-Rice 




7— 


-Illinois 




S- 


Texas 




9- 


-Georgia Tech 




10- 


-Iowa 





in Baltimore 
it's the 



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Collier's All-America 

Stanley Jones, 252 pound Terp tack- 
le, was selected for Collier's All-Amer- 
ica and named Jones "the outstanding 
college lineman of 1953." 

Along with other members of the 
Collier's Magazine All-America team. 
Jones was introduced in full football 
gear to a national TV audience. 

Collier's 64th All-American linos up 
this way: — 



/•»*. 


I'hiin r 


St '"mi 


B. 


Steve Meillnger 


Kentucky 


R. 


Pon Dohonej 


Michigan Btate 


T. 


STAN .KINDS 


MARTI \ n i > 


T. 


Jim Smith 


Baj lor 


<; 


Bob I'M.-.k 


Sj racuae 


<:. 


Crawford Mim- 


Miutaalppl 


v. 


1.:iit\ Morris 


Georgia Tech 


H 


Paul Olel 


Minnesota 


i: 


Paul Cameron 


i CI v 


U 


.1 • ill ii ii > 1 -u t • ii.- r 


Notre I'ain. 


U. 


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"Maryland' 1 



51 



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AP All-America 

Stan Jones made AP's first team All- 
America, Bernie Faloney the second 
team. The choices: 



Don Dohoney, Michigan State 

STANLEY JONES, MARYLAND 

J. 1». Roberts, Oklahoma 

Larry Morris, Georgia Tech 

Crawford Minis. Mississippi 

Jack Shanafelt, ivnn 

Ham Morley, Stanford 

Paul Glel, Minnesota 

John Lattner, Notre Dame 

Paul Cameron, r< l.A 

David (Kosse) Johnson, Rice 

SECOND TEAM 
Carlton Massey, Texas 
Sidney Fournet, LS"U 
Mill Bohart, Washington 
Jerrj Hllgenberg, Iowa 
Gene Lamone, West Virginia 
Art Hunter, Notre Dame 
Steven Mellinger, Kentucky 
BERNIE FALONEY, MARYLAND 
.1. c. Caroline, Illinois 
Bob Garrett, Stanford 
Bobby Cavazos, Texas Tech 



Chet Hanulak and Ralph 
made AP Honorable Mention. 



Felton 



UP All-America 

E. Carlton Massey — Texas 

T. Art Hunter — Notre Dame 

G. .1. D. Robert — Oklahoma 

('. Larry Morris — Georgia Tech 

<;■• Crawford Mims — Mississippi 

T. STANLEY JONES— MARYLAND 

EJ, Dim Dohoney, Michigan State 

15. .1 <>li li Lattner — Notre Dame 

]',. Paul Glel — Minnesota 

B. Paul Cameron — UCLA 
15. J. C. Caroline — Illinois 

SECOND TEAM 

E. Morley — Stanford 

T. Meadows — Duke 

G. Eisenhauer — Navy 

C. Hazeltine — California 
G. Bohart — Washington 
T. Smith — Baylor 

E. Penza — Notre Dame 

B. Garrett — Stanford 

B. Ameche — Wisconsin 

P.. PALI >N FY— MA RYLA N 1 1 

B. p.olilen — Michigan State 

I.N.S. Ail-American 

Two Terps made International News 
Service All-American first team. One 
made the second string. Here's the 
line-up: 

Pos. Name College CI. 

E. Joe Collier Nor'liwes'eru ....Sr. 

E. Carlton Massey Texas Sr. 

T. STAN JONES MARYLAND ...Sr. 

T. Art Hunter Noire Dame ....ST. 

G. P.oli Fleck Syracuse Sr. 

G. .1. D. Roberts Oklahoma Sr. 

C. Matt Hazeltine California Ir. 

Q. BERNIE FALONEY... MARYLAND ....Sr. 

H. Paul Giel Minnesota Sr. 

II. Johnny Lattner Notre Dame Sr. 

F. Paul Cameron UCLA Sr. 

SECOND TEAM 

Ends— Sam Morley, Stanford; Dick Deit- 

rick. Pitt. 

Tackles— Bruce Bosley, West Virginia; 
Jack Shanafelt, Penn ; Don (Jess, S.M.U. 

Guards Crawford Minis. Miss.; Georg 

Tlmberlake, Southern California. 

Center Lary While. New Mexico; Larry 
Mollis. Georgia Tech. 

Backs— Bob Garrett, Stanford; J. C. Caro- 
line, Illinois; CHESTER HANULAK, MARY- 
LAND; Larry Griggs, Oklahoma : Alan 
Ameche, Wisconsin ; Kosse Johnson. Rice. 

Grantland Rice, "Look" 
Grantland Rice, dean of sports 
scribes who, in "Look" carries on as 
successor to the late Walter Camp, se- 
lects Stanley Jones as one of his 22 
man double first string, viz: 



i: 
B. 
E, 
F. 
T. 
T. 
T, 



Ken Buck College of the Pacific 
John Carson Georgia 

Don Doiione.v Mlchfgnn State 
Carlton Masse) Texas 

All lllllllel Nolle D) ' 

STANLEY .MiNI'.s' MARYLAND 
i:.l Meadows — Duke 





J one 8 



Faloney 



T. .lack Shanafell Pennsylvania 

i;. Mill Bohart — Washington 

G. Raj Correll— Kentucky 

(J. Crawford Minis — Mississippi 

(j. .1. D. Roberts — Oklahoma 

C. Mat! Hazeltine — California 

C. Jerry Hilgenberg — Iowa 

P.. Alan Ameche — Wisconsin 

B. Paul Cameron — UCLA 

P.. J. C. Caroline — Illinois 

B. Bob Garrett — Stanford 

11. Paul Giel — Minnesota 

B. David Johnson — Rice 

B. John Lattner — Notre Dame 

B, Jackie Parker — Mississippi State 

South's All-Players 

Maryland's Bernie Faloney was the 
victor in the Chicago Tribune's All- 
Players, All-South battle for Dixie 
quarterback honors. Georgia's Zeke 
Bratkowski and Mississippi State's 
Jack Parker were runners up. 

Maryland's Stanley Jones also won 
a first team tackle spot. 

The selectees become eligible for All- 
Players, All-American Selection. Here's 
the All-Dixie Squad: — 

Ends — Bud Willis, Alabama ; John Carson, 
Georgia. 

Tackles— STANLEY JONES, MARYLAND; 
Eid Meadows, Duke. 

Guards — Ray Correll. Kentucky; Crawford 
Minis. Mississippi. 

Center — Larry Morris, Georgia Tech 

Packs— BERNIE FALONEY, MARYLAND; 
Bill Teas, Georgia Tech; Corky Tharp. Ala- 
bama ; Bobby McCool, Mississippi. 

Honorable mention include Mary- 
land's End Marty Crytzer, Tackle Bob 
Morgan and Back Chet Hanulak. 

National All-Players 

The All-America team, selected by 
votes of players and conducted by 
Chicago Tribune's Arch Ward, has 
Maryland's Stan Jones and Bernie 
Faloney on the first string, viz: — 

E. Don Dohney— Michigan 

F. Carlton Massev — Texas 
T. Dick Chapman — Rice 

T. STANLEY JONES— MARYLAND 

(J. J. D. Roberts — Oklahoma 

G. Ray Correll — Kentucky 
c. Larry Morris — Georgia 

P.. BERNIE FALONEY— MARYLAND 

I'.. Paul Cameron —UCLA 

P.. Paul Giel — Minnesota 

1!. John Lattner — Notre Dame 




Hanulak 



Felton 



62 



"Maryland" 



All-A.C.C. 

Maryland placed four Terps on the 
All-Atlantic Coast Conference team. 

A. C. C. selections follow: — 

FIRST TEAM 
Pos. Player school 

E. Clyde Bennett S.C. 

t. Stanley jones md 

G. Bob Burrows Duke 

C. i Cunningham S.C. 

<:. Frank Mlncevlch S.C. 

T. Ed Meadows Duke 

E. Howard Pit! Duke 

I'.. James i Red i Smll h Duke 

B. BERNIE FALONEY MIL 
B. CHESTER HANULAK Ml). 
U. RALPH FELTON M I ». 

SECOND TEAM 

I'oh. Player School 

!•;. Dreher Gaskin Clemson 

T. Bob Bartholomew Wake Fores! 

G. Bob Kin;.' S.C. 

P. JOHN [RVINE MD. 

G. JOHN BOWERSOX Ml'. 

T. BOB MORGAN MI). 

E. 1UI.I. WALKER Ml). 

B. John Gramllng S.C. 

I'.. Don Kins Clemson 

B. Carl Brazell S.C. 

K. Eddie West N.C. Stntt- 

THIRD TEAM 

Po». Player School 

E. Bob Onndilla Wake Forest 

T. Nathan Gressette Clemson 

O. John Palmer Duke 

G. Ed Patterson N.<\ 

G. Al D'Ansolo N.C. State 

T. Jesse Blrchfielil Duke 

JO. MARTY CRYTZER MD. 

B. Worth Lutz Duke 

B. Jerry Burger Duke 

B. DICK NOLAN MD 

It. Lloyd Caudle Duke 

ACC Sports Writers 

Four Terps made the All-Atlantic 
Coast first team chosen by the South- 
ern Sports Writers Association, viz: — 
first TEAM 

B. Clyde Bennetl S. Carolina 

R. Howard Pitt Duke 

T. Ed Meadows Duke 

T. STAN JONES* MARYLAND 

G. Roll Burrows Duke 

G. JOHN BOWERSOX MARYLAND 

C. Leon Cunningham S. Carolina 

B. BERNIE FALONEY MARYLAND 

B. CHESTER HANULAK MARYLAND 

B. James Smith Duke 

B. John Gramling S. Carolina 

SECOND TEAM 

Ends — Dreher Gaskin. Clemson : R1I.L 
WALKER. MARYLAND. 

Tackles — Bob Bartholomew. Wake Forest ; 
BOB MORGAN. MARYLAND. 

Guards — Frank Mincevich, South Carolina : 
Bob King, South Carolina. 

Center — John Palmer, Duke. 

Backs— RALPH FELTON, MARYLAND ; 
Don King, Clemson : Jerry Barger, Duke ; 
Dick Lackey, North Carolina. 
THIRD TEAM 

Ends — Bob Ondilla, Wake Forest ; MARTY 
CRYTZER. MARYLAND. 

Tackles — Nathan Gressette, Clemson ; Ken 
Yarborough, North Carolina. 

Guards — Al D'Angelo. North Carolina 
State; Ed Patterson. North Carolina. 

Center— JOHN IRVINE. MARYLAND. 

Backs — Ed West. North Carolina ; Lloyd 
Caudle, Duke : Carl Brazell, South Carolina ; 
Connie Gravitte, North Carolina. 

Other Selections 
Paramount Movietone News of the 
Day selected Stan Jones and Bernie 
Faloney for the first team. Sporting 
News Quarterback and NEA chose 
Jones for the first team and Faloney 
for the second. 

Coach Of The Year 

Maryland's Head Coach, Jim Tatum, 
was voted the A.C.C.'s "Coach of the 
Year," by the 40-man vote of Southern 
sports writers. Second was South Caro- 
lina's Rex Enright, good coach of a 
good team. 

ACC Player Of Year 

The 40 vote poll of Dixie sports writ- 
ers named Terp Bernie Faloney "Play- 
er of the Year." 



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'Maryland" 



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USE THE COUPON 
ON LAST PAGE 



Just like the "Series" 

It's like the big leagues in a World's 
Series, the top team in the ACC each 
year meeting the top team of the Big 
Seven. 

The arrangement relieves the pres- 
sure from all teams in either bracket, 
eliminates all late season eleventh 
hour conjecture and indicates that the 
Orange Bowl folk will go along for the 
good of college football in what is ob- 
viously a much more rational procedure 
than the post season turmoil prevalent 
during previous years. 

The set up lines' em up like so: — 



Atlantic Coast 
Conference 
Maryland 
Virginia 
Ninth Carlina 
N. Carolina State 

Duke 

Wake Fores! 

South Carolina 
< llemson 



Southwest 
Conference 
Nebraska 

Missouri 
Iowa State 

Kansas 
Kansas State 
Oklahoma 
Colorado 



Under terms of the agreement each 
team has been guaranteed $110,000 for 
the 1954 game and $112,000 for the 
1955 contest. 

Three thousand seats are being add- 
ed to the Orange Bowl to bring seat- 
ing capacity to 70,000. The games will 
be televised and broadcast nationally. 

Eight months of negotiations for the 
Orange Bowl agreement were com- 
pleted when faculty representatives of 
the Big Seven voted in favor of it. 
The Atlantic Coast group already had 
approved. 

Only the Sugar Bowl still selects 
both teams at random. The Cotton 
Bowl picks one at large to meet the 
Southwest Conference champion. The 
Rose Bowl from the Big Ten and Pa- 
cific Coast Conferences. 

The field from which the Sugar and 
Cotton Bowls choose was greatly nar- 
rowed by the Orange Bowl's action. 

The Orange Bowl entered pact with 
the Big Seven and Atlantic Coast con- 
ferences supplies bowl teams for the 
next two years. 

W. Bruce Macintosh, Orange Bowl 
prexy, said the Orange Bowl would 
"accept the selection of each confer- 
ence" for the game. He said the in- 
itial agreement with the two confer- 
ences is for two years, "but we hope 
and I believe it will become a per- 
manent fixture." 

Reaves E. Peters, executive secre- 
tary of the Southwest Conference, said 
that conference definitely would not let 
the same team play in the bowl on 
successive years. 

If a team wins the title two years 
and if the runnerup decides against 
playing in a bowl, then the faculty 
would select its representative. 

Four Horsemen 

Dutch Bergman, football columnist 
and former collegiate and pro coach, 
who was a playing senior at Notre 
Dame when the famed Four Horse- 
men of the mid 20's were freshmen 
writes that the '53 Terp backfield of 
Faloney, Felton, Hanulak and Nolan 
are "as good or better" than were 



the Four Horsemen, Harry Stuhldreher, 
Elmer Layden, Jim Crowley and Don 
Miller. 

Lonely, but Right! 

In the AP's pre-season poll 171 votes 
went to Notre Dame to wind up the 
season No. 1. One (1) vote — repeat 
"one" went to Maryland. It was cast 
by Marty Zad, Washington Post, Mary- 
land alumnus. 

Why is an expert ? What makes a 
man want to predict what will happen 
in sports. Let's look at some of the 
September prognostications. Colliers 
had Notre Dame No. 1 with Maryland 
No. 8. Stanley Woodward, in "Foot- 
ball Stars" picked Maryland for No. 13. 
True Magazine gave the Terps No. 9. 
Grantland Rice in Look tabs the Terp- 
tatums as No. 6. Fred Russell in the 
Saturday Evening Post tabbed Mary- 
land for the No. 2 position, behind 
Notre Dame. 

Teams variously rated to finish ahead 
of Maryland were Notre Dame, UCLA, 
Georgia Tech, Michigan State, Ohio 
State, Alabama, Oklahoma and South- 
ern California. 

After Maryland was voted the No. 
1 spot ahead of Notre Dame a fellow 
named Duggan on a Chicago paper 
dumped a major league diatribe of 
verbal garbage, Billingsgate, slander 
and schmierkaese, ideally suited for 
paste up on Terrapin locker room 
doors. Duggan's classic contains such 
phrases as, "the Maryland jerks who 
will be chased into the stands by 
Oklahoma," "the muttonheads who 
dropped Notre Dame from top place in 
the polls can't chin themselves out of 
the intellectual gutter." "Maryland's 
schedule consists of teams Notre Dame 
could beat before breakfast. The girls' 
school, St. Mary's, next door, could go 
through a schedule like that without 
defeat," etc., etc. 

Notre Dame's opponents averaged 
two touchdowns per game. Maryland 
allowed a total of five touchdowns all 
season. In a game at Chapel Hill, North 
Carolina scored twice against Notre 
Dame. When the Tarheels met Mary- 
land at Chapel Hill the Terps shut 
them out. All season Jim Tatum called 
off the first team when the Terps had 
a fair lead. 'Sfunny; AP's pollsters 
were a great, big fair and honest group 
until Notre Dame was held to that 
Iowa tie and resultant second place. 
Suddenly the AP's vote casters became 
receding heels. 

Maryland 21 ; Alabama 

Maryland's mighty Terrapins dis- 
played to the Nation the greatness of 
which they are capablein a crushing 
21-0 win over Alabama to hold the 
Nation's longest winning streak of 
ten games. 

Chet Hanulak, ("First Down") Han- 
ulak, and Bill Walker, Maryland's 
catch and carry sophomore end, con- 
verted the haze and smog that over- 
hung Byrd Stadium into a bright oc- 
casion for the Tatum's terrific terps. 

Squaring the '52 defeat by Alabama, 
and sighting in on a bowl tie, the 



54 



"Maryland" 



Terps wrapped up the ball game with 
three touchdowns in the first half, two 
of them scintillating contributions by 
Walker with pass catches from Bernie 
Faloney and Charlie Boxold, and the 
other coming from an 81-yard jaunt 
by Hanulak early in the first period. 
This made the National TV Show as 
"the play of the week." 

Before a capacity crowd of 86,000 
fans and a full press box, including 
newspaper men from all points of the 
nation, Coach Jim Tatum's team rose 
to both occasions, offense and defense, 
and showed why they deserved the 
national number one rank. 

The only advantage Alabama en- 
joyed was the toss of the coin to 
start the show. Alabama elected to 
receive and took charge until 5Mj 
minutes had elapsed in the first quar- 
ter. Maryland took over after an 
Alabama punt. On the second play 
from scrimmage, Hanulak took a hand- 
off from Faloney to a trap lay over 
the center's position where John Irvine 
and John Bowersox opened the gap. 
Hanulak lit out for the secondary, and 
then reverted heading for the left side- 
lines. On the Crimson Tide 45, he 
danced away from the last 'Bama safe- 
ty man and raced the rest of the way 
untouched. 

Maryland had its touchdown in 6 
minutes of play. Six minutes later 
it had another spanning 80 yards from 
a touchback punt by Alabama. 
Terp's Walker Scores 

Faloney set it in motion with a 
long pitch from the 48, but it was 
Walker who made the play go for a 
touchdown. Walker took the ball on 
the 'Bama 14, but had only finger- 
tip control and did not gain full pos- 
session of the pigskin until he reached 
the five yard line. From there he 
pulled away from the safety man for 
the tally. 

Faloney was in the ball game for 
only 16 minutes, when he was helped 
off the field for the afternoon with 
torn ligaments in his knee. 

Charlie Boxold engineered the first 
team backfield, with only 31 seconds 
of the half remaining. Hiding the ball 
until Walker could maneuver, Boxold 
found his end in the end zone from 
27 yards out and hit him with a touch- 
down pass beyond the groping hands 
of defender Bart Starr for Maryland's 
third and final score. Ralph Felton 
hit his mark for the three extra 
points. 

The Terrapins, although they never 
crossed the goal line again, gave the 
crowd an additional thrill with their 
great defensive play in the last half. 

Alabama charged down field on 
Starr's passes, but not until Bobby 
Luna's catch on the two-yard line 
did Tatum send in his first team. Then 
the Terrapins literally rubbed 'Bama's 
noses in the ground. Luna charged 
into the middle and got nothing. He 
tried left tackle and three of the 
secondary bolted in to stop him for 
no gain. Tharp tried right guard, 
with Bob Morgan leading the charge 
to halt him for no gain. In a des- 



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peration play, Stone tried a leaping 
dive over the middle on fourth down, 
but when the officials unpiled the two 
teams, the ball rested on the Mary- 
land 2-foot line. 

The Crimson Tide surged down to 
the Maryland's 7-yard line, the 6-yard 
line, then 10-yard line, and the 4-yard 
line, but each time the Old Line de- 
fense stiffened, brought a halt to any 
'Bama hope to stop a shutout. 

The crowd was impressed by the fact 
that a powerful team like Alabama in 
five desperaate tries to crash the Terps 
defenses could reflect only gestures of 
utter futility. 

By winning 21 to 0, Maryland 
brought its season's total to 298 points 
to 31 for its opponents, the lowest 
since Maryland started playing foot- 
ball in 1892. Alabama thus became 
the sixth foe of the 1953 season to be 
held scoreless. 

Visiting coaches, scouts, and experts 
in such things, including those from 
Alabama, were kind enough to un- 
limber such comments as, "The best 
defensive line I've ever seen," "The 
best backfield Pve ever seen," "The best 
coached team Pve ever seen." What 
else is there to say? Well we liked 
the experts opinions on the post game 
dressing room reaction of the '52 
Terps: "No collegiate excitement. No 
back slapping. The feeling ran deep. 
The professional attitude paramount. 
They recalled the New York Yankees 
after a world series win." 

Coach Tatum said this "convinced 
me Pve never had a better line." He 
maintained all season his backfield 
was the best in seven years at Mary- 
land, so that made it the best all- 
around. 

The victory was also a nice bundle 
for Dr. H. C. Byrd, who saw his last 
home game as President of the Uni- 
versity. As part of R.O.T.C. Day, the 
Corps of Cadets presented Dr. Byrd 
with a minature bomber. The Presi- 
dent accepted it "on behalf of the fac- 
ulty, alumni, and students who have 
made this University great," adding, 
"I am particularly happy to accept 
it because it comes from young men 
who stand ready to serve their coun- 
try in uniform." Dr. Byrd's eyes were 
understandably misty. Before him a 
great football team crowning a scintil- 
lant season representing a University 
to which Dr. Byrd devoted a life time 
of brilliant and successful effort. 

After the game, the spectators left 
the stadium slowly, awaiting the final 
outcome of the Notre Dame-Iowa game. 
When the final score was called out 
from the press box, the fans knew 
their Maryland team was the number 
one in the county. 

The record of (55,000 words that went 
out over the Western Unions wires 
also agreed with these Terp supporters. 
As a member of the Terrapin club 
shouted coming up the aisle after 
the game, "See you in Miami for 
the Orange Bowl." 

Maryland 38; Mississippi 
No longer does Maryland have to 
take criticism of the Terps' "sorry" 



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56 



opponents. They squelched that with 
a crushing 38 to win over Mississippi. 
In beating Ole Miss, Coach Jim Ta- 
tum's charges made it nine straight 
wins, triumphed over a team that had 
broken Maryland's 19 game winning 
streak last year, answered the question 
of "Who have you beaten", the Na- 
tion's llth-ranking team, knocked Ole 
Miss out of their bid for the Sugar 
Bowl and made the Orange Bowl in- 
vitation a mere formality for the Col- 
lege Park eleven. 

Before a 35,000 Dad's Day crowd, 
Maryland rose to one of its greatest 
hours in a decisive triumph which an- 
swered the critics from coast to coast. 
The game was broadcast over both 
CBS and NBC, and listeners all over 
the country heard a game that was 
won not by the efforts of one player, 
but by a team victory with stars on 
the line, co-heroes in the backfield and 
first string performance, by the so- 
called second team. 

Maryland's great defensive power 
again stood out and showed why they 
ranked tops nationally in total yards 
gained rushing, as they held the Ole 
Miss backfield to 39 yards on the 
ground. The Terps also disapproved 
the theory that any team can pass 
on Maryland by snagging six Missis- 
sippi aerials, one of which was termed 
by Rebel Coach Johnny Vaught as the 
turning point of the game. This in- 
terception came in the initial period 
with Mississippi in scoring position 
on the 1-yard line. Bernie Faloney 
latched onto a pass in the end zone 
for a touchback and stiflled the only 
scoring opportunity Mississippi had 
the entire afternoon. 

Late in the first quarter, Rebel quar- 
terback Paslay was rushed while try- 
ing to find a receiver down field, in- 
stead, his sights caught the fancy of 
John Irvine, and the Terp center raced 

"Maryland" 



from the 33-yard line to the Rebel 2. 
Three plays later Faloney had his 
touchdown. 

Maryland scored the next time it 
gained possession, moving 88 yards 
in four plays. After Chet Hanulak 
had reeled off 40 yards, Ralph Felton 
began his jaunt that had the fans still 
talking after the game. Felton took 
a pitchout from Faloney and cut to 
the right. Quickly he reversed his 
field and headed for the corner of 
the end zone. With the Rebels clos- 
ing in, Ronnie Waller came from no- 
where and chopped down his objective 
with such force that the stands 
groaned, paving the way for Felton 
to score. This play made nationwide 
TV screens as the national "play of 
the week." 

Touchdown number three was set up 
after Dick Burgee intercepted another 
Rebel aerial and returned it to the 
Ole Miss 43. Faloney engineered the 
Terp offensive and making use of the 
option play, Bernie touched oft the 
drive, scoring from nine yards out. 

Bielski Splits Uprights 

With time running out, Maryland 
kicked off and Bill Kinard fumbled 
with Dick Bielski recovering on the 
Ole Miss 21. With 5 seconds to go, 
Bielski split the uprights for a three- 
pointer and the Terps left the field 
ahead by 24 points and Ole Miss a lit- 
tle dazed. Faloney piloted another 
tally before leaving the game. Bernie 
handed off to Bielski on two straight 
plays, and the Terp fullback churned 
up 19-yards and 41-yards, the last 
jaunt good for the score. 

Russell Dennis made the last touch- 
down possible by catching a Lynn 
Beightol pass flat on his back on the 
Ole Miss 2-yard line for a 44-yard 
gain. Beightol traveled over from the 
two for the final score. 

Word was received in the dressing 
room following the game that Ala- 
bama had downed Georgia Tech and 
South Carolina having knocked off un- 
beaten West Virginia to add more 
luster to the Terp's prestige. Coach 
Tatum said: "What did I tell you arxut 
South Carolina? I said they were 
good, didn't I? Now you know." 

In the meantime Notre Dame was 
defeating North Carolina 34-14. How- 
ever, the score doesn't tell the whole 
story as far as Maryland fans are 
concerned. The Terps beat the Tar 
Heel eleven 26-0 and did not choose to 
pile up the score. Notre Dame not 
only was scored upon twice by the 
Carolinians, but had to go all out to 
win. In point comparisons, this makes 
it the Fighting Irish 20 points bet- 
ter than Carolina and Maryland 26 
points. 

Tough to Take 

It was a shocking and disappointing 
defeat for the confident Mississippi. 
Mississippi and Tennessee sports 
writers had taunted the Terps re- 
peatedly, one writing that "Ole Miss 
would shut Jim Tatum's mouth in his 

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bragging about his overrated football 
team. (Good reading in the Terp 
dressing room.) 

The game was the annual Parents 
Dav (erroneously tabbed Dad's Day) 
with parents of students as house 
guests as the entire campus held open 
house and inspection tours. 

A special luncheon was served in 
the University Dining hall. 

In the Stadium the fathers of the 
football players were introduced, each 
dad wearing the number correspond- 
ing to that of his son. The Naval Avia- 
tion drill team from Pensacola gave 
iin exhibition. 

The band and card section will enter- 
tain at half-time with a special "Salute 
to Dad." 

Following the game a coffee hour, 
sponsored by the International club, 
will be held in the Rec hall. Men's and 
women's dorms as well as the fratern- 
ity and sorority houses have open 
houses planned for after the game. 

Bill Hottel Returns 

In the 
press box a 
truly big hel- 
lo was un- 
wrapped b y 
all hands for 
Bill Hottel, 
great and 
long -time 
booster for 
anything la- 
beled "Mary- 
land." 

Bill return- 
ed from a 
long siege of 
h o s p i t- 
alization, the 
sort of re- 
c o v e r y 
b r o u g h t 
about by plenty of the old moxie. It 
was A-l to see Bill back in harness. 

Maryland 27; George Washington (5 

Shaking off a "cold" first half which 
saw Maryland leading George Wash- 
ington by only 7 to 6, the Terps warm- 
ed during intermission and came back 
at snow banked Griffith Stadium to 
down the Colonials 27 to C>. 

A blocked punt and an interception 
got Jim Tatum's Terrapins rolling in 
the third session after which Mary- 
land never was seriously threatened 
while registering its eighth straight 
triumph. 

Maryland opened the scoring in the 
first period with a 43-yard Bernie 
Faloney to Chet Hanulak pass play 
covering most of the initial offensive. 
Ralph Felton churned over right tackle 
for the six points and added the extra 
tally, making it 7-0, Maryland, after 
8 minutes 59 seconds. 

George Washington capitalized on 
an interception in the second period 
and scored its only touchdown on a 
pass from Bill Weaver to Richie Gas- 

kell. 

Coach Jim Tatum tired up his team 
during the halves. A different brand 
of Terrapin warriors carpe hack on 
the field to start the last two periods. 




)/;-. Iloltrl 



Bob Morgan, Bill Walker, George 
Palahunik and Jack Bowersox halted 
a short George Washington offensive, 
and Weaver was forced to punt. Walk- 
er, charging in from right end, part- 
ially blocked the boot, and Felton re- 
covered for Marvland on the Colonial's 
3(5. 

After Dick Nolan advanced to the 
33, Hanulak took a wide pitchout from 
Faloney and streaked all the way for 
touchdown No. 2. Felton's placement 
made it 14 to G, after 4 minutes 50 
seconds of the third session. 

Three minutes later, Faloney made 
it 20 to 6, on a slanting quarterback 
sneak from the 2-yard marker, after 
himself setting up the score by com- 
ing un with a Colonial fumble at the 
GW 11-yard line. 

Following a George Washington 
punt, Dick Bielski bolted through right 
tackle and churned 38 yards to the 
GW 11. On the ensuing play, Joe 
Horning swept left end on a lateral 
from Charley Boxold and registered 
Maryland's concluding six points. Biel- 
ski split the uprights and Maryland 
went ahead 27 to 6. 

The Colonial's only penetration of 
the second half carried just over the 
midfield stripe into Maryland terri- 
tory late in the contest. GW was 
held to 33-yards in net rushing and 
75-yards via the air ways. The Terps 
clicked off a total of 302 yards on 
offense. 

Maryland 24; South Carolina 6 

Coach Jim Tatum's "Terrible Terps" 
defeated Rex Enr'ght's South Caro- 
linians, 24 to 6 before a 22,000 Home- 
coming crowd. 

Ralph Felton and Chester Hanulak 
registered a pa : r of touchdowns with- 
in a span of one minute and 20 seconds 
late in the initial quarter. 

Felton dove over the center of the 
line for the game's first tally after 12 
minutes and 10 seconds of the first- 
period action. Quarterback Bernie Fa- 
loney started the 44-yard touchdown 
drive by pilfering a deflected Johnny 
Cramling pass and raced back 12 yards 
with the ball to the Carolina 44. 

A 17-vard pass play, Faloney to Dick 
Nolan, kept the Terps rolling toward 
ray-dirt, and from there it was mostly 
Felton eating up the remaining dis- 
tance in short spurts for the score. 

Four plays later, Maryland had 
another touchdown. Hanulak took a 
Carolina punt on his own 34 and started 
down the right side line. Aided by a 
block from Nolan, Hanulak picked up 
his blockers and crossed the final stripe 
with John Bowersox throwing another 
key block on the five-yard line to per- 
mit the "Hackensack Flash" to cross 
the line untouched. 

After an exchange of punts, Carolina 
put together a scoring drive covering 
45 yards with Bill Whorman driving 
over for the only Gamecock score. 

Maryland came right back after the 
kickoff, Hanulak's explosive running 
advancing the first-down chains twice 
to the South Carolina 30. With only 



58 



"Maryland" 



two seconds remaining in the first half, 

Tatum sent in Dick Hielski for Ralph 
Felton at the fullback position. The 
result was a field goal boot from the 
37 yard line to give the Terpa a 17-6 
intermission lead. 

Following a scoreless third period, 
the Terrapins' No. 2 "shocktroop" unit 
capped off a 55-yard offensive set in 
motion by the first-stringers, as Ed 
Vereb shot through right tackle for six 
yards and the game's final touchdown. 

Speaking on his team's effort Tatum 
seemed well pleased when he said, 
"Running against that big Carolina line 
was enough for one afternoon's work." 
The Terp mentor also praised the de- 
fensive work of Stan Jones, Faloney 
and John Irvine. 

During the Homecoming Dance inter- 
mission, Chester Hanulak was awarded 
the "Unsung Hero" trophy presented 
by the Gate and Key Honorary Fra- 
ternity. The award was voted upon by 
his teammates in a poll taken in the 
locker room following the game. 

Maryland 30; Miami 

"Maryland has one of the greatest 
teams I've ever seen," said Miami Head 
Coach Andy Gustafson after his team 
lost a decisive 30-0 game to Maryland 
in the Orange Bowl. 

The powerful Terps turned oppor- 
tunist before the Miami crowd; con- 
verting two fumbles and a pass inter- 
ception into three quick scores with 
Chester Hanulak, Ralph Felton, and 
Marty Crytzer registering the tallies. 

Felton, who emerged the leading 
ground-gainer of the one-sided con- 
test with 97 yards in 15 carries, set 
up the first Maryland tally on the 
third scrimmage play. The bruising 
Terp fullback intercepted a Miami 
pass on the home team's 41-yard line 
and raced the pigskin to the Hui-- 
ricane 22. 

Five plays later, after Bernie Fa- 
loney had flipped a 15-yard pass to 
Dick Nolan to move into position, 
Hanulak hurled through left tackle 
from the one to send Maryland six 
points ahead. Felton kicked the extra 
point, and it was 7 to after only 
4 minutes 15 seconds of play. 

On the ensuing kickoff, Miami's 
fullback, Porky Oliver, met full force 
with Maryland's Crytzer, with the 
Terp end jarring the ball loose to be 
recovered by Co-captain Bob Morgan. 
Faloney, who baffled Miami with his 
ball-handling and play calling, col- 
laborated with Hanulak and Felton 
in moving to the 11. After having 
a touchdown run by Hanulak nullified 
because of an offside penalty, Faloney 
fired a perfect 8-yard touchdown strike 
to Crytzer, wide-open in the end zone. 
Felton again split the uprights and 
Maryland lead 14 to at 8:59. 

Three plays later, Russell Dennis 
bulldozed his way into the Miami back- 
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60 



attempted pass play, and Dennis came 
up with it on a great play at the 
Hurricane 22. 

It took Felton, Hanulak, and Fa- 
loney five handoffs and pitchouts to 
run through and around the bewildered 
Hurricanes. Felton dove the final yard 
for TD number three and Maryland's 
twentieth point after only 12% minutes 
of play. 

Maryland's second team took over 
to start the second period, and prompt- 
ly marched 66 yards to a fourth and 
final touchdown. 

A 13-yard smash by Dick Bielski and 
a startling 54-yard forward-pass play 
from Charley Boxold to Jim Parson 
covered most of the distance. Ronnie 
Waller streaked the remaining four 
yards to tally. Bielski kicked the point 
to run the score to 27-0. 

Bielski contributed the only points 
in the second half with a booming 
29-yard field goal in final period. Box- 
old's 17-yard flip to Ed Vereb and a 
52-yard heave to Paul Kramer jockeyed 
the ball into position for Bielski's three- 
pointer. 

Maryland overwhelmed the Hurri- 
canes statistically in posting their third 
victory in as many starts against 
Miami in football. 

Folks 'round and about Miami sang 
Terp praises for a week after, not only 
because Maryland had given them a 
great show by a great team, but also 
because the Terps didn't lay it on 
against a weaker but game outfit. 

Lost in the Snow 

Former Maryland football star Paul 
Nestor, now at the School of Dentistry, 
and a hunting companion were found 
in the rugged Kanaan Valley brush 
country of West Virginia by a search 
party about 10 hours after they be- 
came lost in a snowstorm. 

Nestor, who played end on the Uni- 
versity of Maryland team in 1952, and 
Burton George, 35, a Parson taxi 
business proprietor, became lost while 
hunting turkey and bear. 

Search parties found Nestor and 
George huddled beside a fire about 
3 a.m. 

Sugar Bowl 

Only once before in Terp gridiron 
history did a Maryland team go un- 
defeated and untied. That was the 
Sugar Bowl year 1951 with a record 
like so: 

r.4 Washington and I>e 14 

.•'.:'. Qeorge Washington c 

4:t Georgia 7 

14 North Carolina 7 

27 Louisiana State o 

:s."i Missouri o 

40 Niivy 21 

r,:: North Carolina State 

. r >4 West Virginia 7 

2N Tennessee (8ugar Bowl) la 

381 Totals 62 



BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 

Coach H. A. {Bud) Millikan 





Coach Millikan 



aryland's basketball 
team has been invited 
and accepted to play 
in the Kentucky Ail- 
American city basket- 
ball tournament, as 
guest of Kentucky 
Wesleyan. 
"This year's team is one of the best 
teams I have had at Maryland," Coach 
Bud Milliken said, 
■ adding "I believe we 
have the team to take 
on a tough schedule, 
and should be strong 
for the All-American 
tournament." 

With three starters 

from last year's team 

gone, Milliken expects 

some real strength to 

be added from last 

year's freshman, Bob 

Kessler, Marv Long 

and John Sandbower. 

Returning lettermen from last year's 

team are Gene Shue, Ron Brooks, 

Ralph Greco, Bob Dilworth, Tom Young 

and Bob Everet. 

Ineligible last year, down from Long 
Island is John Peterson, who worked 
out with the squad during spring prac- 
tice. Coach Milliken expects Peterson 
to play a lot of ball this season along 
with Dave Webster, of Washington. 

Maryland 53; So. Carolina 49 

The Millikanmen opened the season 
auspiciously with a 53-49 win over 
South Carolina. 

A jump shot by Forward Tom Young 
from the free-throw circle with 20 
seconds remaining provided the Terp 
victory, before 3,500. 

With two minutes remaining, South 
Carolina dropped in a one-hander to 
tie at 49-49. With 20 seconds remain- 
ing, Young dropped in his jump shot. 
The Gamecocks moved downcourt, 
missed a shot and Maryland's Young 
was fouled. With one second remain- 
ing, Young sank moth. 

Four points was the widest margin 
ever opened up by either team. Late 
in the third, South Carolina held a 
four-point lead. 

Maryland 81; Clemson 41 

In their second game the Terps took 
Clemson, 81-41. 

Maryland showed superior shooting, 
passing and defensive work that left 
the Tigers helpless. 

Forward Gene Shue, center Bob 
Everett and guard Bob Kessler sparked 
the offense and helped provide a tight 
defense that kept Clemson too far out 
to threaten. Shue and Everett shared 
scoring honors with 18 points each. 

Deacons 71; Terps 54 

Wake Forest topped Maryland 71-64. 
The Deacons' Lefty Davis starred and 
led the scoring. Maryland was ahead 

"Maryland" 



36-33 at the half but Davis and Heniric 
overcame that. Gene Sline was the 
Terps' star. 







Court Schedule 


Dee. 


8 


William and Mary 


Dec. 


14 


West Virginia 


*Dec. 


17 


V.P.I. 


*Dec. 


18 


South Carolina 


Dec. 


30- 


Jan. 2 All-America City 
Tournament 


Jan. 


4 


Richmond 


♦Jan. 


5 


Virginia 


*Jan. 


fi 


Clemson 


Jan. 


9 


Georgetown 


♦Jan. 


11 


Richmond 


♦Jan. 


15 


George Washington 


Jan. 


18 


Virginia 


Jan. 


30 


Tampa 


Feb. 


1 


Miami 


Feb. 


4 


Washington and Lee 


Feb. 


5 


V.P.I. 


♦Feb. 


11 


Washington and Lee 


Feb. 


13 


Navy 


♦Feb. 


15 


Wake Forest 


♦Feb. 


16 


Duke 


♦Feb. 


18 


Georgetown 


Feb. 


23 


George Washington 


♦Feb. 


25 


William and Mary 

A.C.C. Tournament 




♦Home Meets at College Park 



WRESTLING 



aryland's wrestling 
team, coached by Wil- 
liam "Sully" Krouse, 
will meet some of the 
top teams in the east 
this season including 
Penn State and Navy. The Terps will 
also test the Atlantic Coast's latest 
member, Virginia, in 
what Coach "Sully" 
Krouse points out 
will be the strong- 
est Conference team 
the Terps will face. 
Leading the Ter- 
rapin matmen will 
be Team Captain 
Rodney Norris, 137- 
pounder, brothers 
Bob and Ernie 
Fischer at 157 and 
coach Krouse 167 pounds respec- 
tively, and Bob Drake at 177 pounds. 

Mat Schedule 

♦Dec. 12 — West Virginia 
18 — Virginia 




♦Jan. 



♦Feb. 



14 — Duke 

20— Navy 

5 — Washington and Lee 
10— Penn State 
13— V. M. I. 
19 — North Carolina 

27— North Carolina State 



♦Home meets at College Park. 



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BOXING 




aryland's southpaw 
coach, Frank Cronin, is 
fielding a boxing squad 
this year in which five 
of his first stringers are 
also portsiders. 

At 125 Gary Garber, 
former All -Army champ, who was na- 
tional runner up last year, will again 
be wearing Terp silks. 

At 132 Guido Canri, lefty from last 
year's freshmen, will be ready to step. 

Another southpaw, at 139, is Vince 
Palumbo. 

Bob Theofield, that good puncher 
from last vear, will try it again at 
147. 

Pat Duffy, also a portsider, will go 
at 156. 

At 165 it will be either Ronnie 
Rhodes, '52 All South champion, or 
Bill Mclnnis, and at 175 it will be 
either Rhodes, Mclnnis or Leo Coyne, 
yet another southpaw. 

In the unlimited bracket Cronin ex- 
pects real things from left handed 
Bob Cavanaugh, who dH some excel- 
lent boxing in the Service, while Bi'l 
Mess and Tom Brodie will also try 
for the heavyweight spot. 





Schedule 


Date 


Opponent 


*Jan. 16 


Syracuse 


* Feb. 6 


Penn State 


Feb. 12 


Either LSU or 




State 


Feb. 20 


Army 


Feb. 27 


South Carolina 


Mar. 6 


Virginia 



Idahc 



Home Meets af College Park 

13 Ring Champs 

The list of ring title holders at 
Maryland consists of only 13 names. 
They are, chronologically: Stewart Mc- 
Caw, 175 pounder, who won Southern 
titles in '34 and '35; Ivan Nedomatsky, 
135-145, who won in '35, '36, '37; Benny 
Alperstein, 125-135, who won in '38 and 
'39 and also took NCAA national titles 
in '37 and '38; Tom Birmingham, 127, 
who won in '37; Newton. Cox, 165, who 
won in '3D; Frank Cronin, 155, who won 
in '3!); Herb Gunther, 175. who won in 
'41; Eddie Rieder, 155, who won in 
'47 and '48; Kenny Malone who took 
the heavy title in '47; Spencer Hopkins, 
who won at 13(1 in '49; Don Oliver, 155 




pound winner in '50, 165 winner in '51; 
Ronnie Rhodes, 165 pound winner in 
'52; Calvin Quenstedt, heavyweight 
winner, '53, Eastern Intercollegiate 
Tournament. 

SOCCER 

Maryland 5; Duke 1 

aryland's soccer team 
continued its dominance 
over old Southern Con- 
ference opponents as the 
Terps downed the Duke 
Blue Devils 5-1 in an At- 
lantic Conference match. 
Otto Wincklemann opened the scor- 
ing for the Terps in the first quarter. 
Jim Spear, Jose Hagedorn and Hector 
Salinas dented the Duke net for three 
more tallies in the second quarter to 
give the Terps a 4-0 first half lead. 
John Nalgel added another goal in 
the fourth quarter before Duke scored 
its only marker in the same period. 

Maryland Wins ACC Title 
Maryland's soccer team annexed the 
Atlantic Coast Conference champion- 
ship by defeating the University of 
North Carolina 8-1. 

The victory gave Coach Doyle 
Royal's Terps their 
fifth straight title, 
as they had domi- 
nated the old South- 
ern Conference 
crown in 1950, 1951, 
1952 and 1953. 

Coach Doyle Roy- 
al's Terrapins, 
somewhat thwarted 
in the first half, 
turned loose in the 
late stages of the 
| game to wrap up the 
title. Carolina scor- 
ed first, but the 
Coach Royal Terps tied it up be- 

fore the quarter was over and then 
scored twice in the second period to 
lead 3-1 at halftime. 

Jose Hagedorn and Hector Salinas 
paced the Royalists with two goals 
apiece. Otto Wincklemann, George 
Reiner, Ben Goetemiller and Schock 
each tallied once for the winners. 
Maryland 4; N. Carolina St. 
Jose Hagedorn, junior from the 
Philippines, booted a goal at 30 sec- 
onds of the first quarter for Mary- 
land in a soccer game against North 
Carolina State and added two more 
in the second quarter to pace the 
Terps to a 4 to victory. 

Otto Wincklemann, from South 
America, scored the final Maryland 
gopl in the last quarter. 

It was Maryland's second straight 
Atlantic Coast Conference victory. 

Maryland 6; Navy 5 

Jose Hagedorn banged a goal into 
the right corner of the net in the 
second overtime period to gain Mary- 
land a 6 to 5 soccer victory over Navy. 

The Terrapins, capturing their third 
straight win, went ahead in the first 




62 



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quarter, fell behind after the half and 
had to wait until only three minutes 
remained in the bruising battle to win. 

Otto Wincklemann, Maryland's in- 
side left, scored three times. The 
Terps took only two shots in the 
opening quarter, but Wincklemann 
and Hagedorn made both of them 
good. 

After the regulation game ende 1 
4-4, a goal by Frank McLaughlin gave 
the Middies a brief advantage. .Tim 
Spear, of Maryland, tied it up with a 
minute left in the first overtime. 

Maryland 4; Loyola 1 

Coach Doyle Royal's soccer team 
overcame a 1-1 halftime deadlock score 
and three goals in the final two periods 
to defeat Loyola 4-1. 

Jose Hagedorn dented the Grey- 
hound's net in the second quarter to 
give the Terps a one point lead. Third 
period tallies by Hector Salinas and 
George Reiner increased the Terrapin 
advantage 3-1. Hagedorn added an- 
other in the final quarter to end the 
scorings. 

Maryland 0; Johns Hopkins 2 

Johns Hopkins scored its first soccer 
victory over Maryland in the history 
of the two school's rivalry by 2 to 0. 

The Blue Jays tallied goals in the 
first and second periods to trim the 
Terps. The shutout was the Terrapins 
first since the opening game of the 
1952 season when they were trounced 
by Penn State 10 to 0. 

Maryland 4; Connecticut 

Maryland's soccer team shut out 
Connecticut, 4 to 0. Otto Wincke'mann 
scored twice in the first period to lead 
the victorious Terns. 

Hector Salinas hit for another tally 
in the initial period, while team can- 
tain Tom Baden scored Maryland's 
final marker in the third. 

Maryland 3; W & L 

Coach Doyle Royal's soccer team 
scored once in the first half, and added 
two more in the last session to beat 
Washington and Lee 3-0. Joe Hage- 
dorn, Otto Wincklemann, and Charles 
Wicker each dented the Washington 
and Lee net for all three Maryland 
score. 

Maryland 4; W. Maryland 2 
Jose Hagedorn and Otto Winckel- 
man scored two goals each for Mary- 
land as the Terrapin soccer team 
downed scrappy Western Maryland, 
4-2, in the season finale for both teams. 
The victory gave Maryland an 8-2 
record for the season. 

"Maryland" 




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68 



BASEBALL 




any patches of snow did 
not exactly suggest 
thoughts of baseball, 
as construction of the 
new baseball park near- 
ed completion. 

Located directly east 
of Byrd stadium, the 
now stands will seat 2,500 persons. 

The exterior will present a colonnade 
effect. 

At the top of the stands, 24 columns, 
backed by a brick wall, will support a 
roof, furnishing shelter as well as orna- 
mentation. 

Spectators will enter the stands 
through a central entrance with a ticket 
booth on either side, and will sit on 
benches fashioned after those of Byrd 
stadium. 

In one wing there will be extensive 
storage space under the stands. 



TERP IN JAPAN 
dpi. William /•;. tloulden gets ready to 
nicing irith tin 1st Cavalry Division's 8th 
Regiment baseball team in Japan. Corporal 
Uoulden entered the Army in September l!>."ii 
after graduating from 44S in '51. 




CROSS COUNTRY 



"YOU SEE THE TERRAPIN IS 
WISE TOO. 

HE READS 




WHAT GOES ON AT OUR ALMA MATER? 

WHAT OF OUR CLASSMATES? WHAT'S THE ALUMNI 
NEWS? THE SPORTS NEWS? 

Clip this ad and coupon and send it in. You can use the coupon for 
renewals too. Make your overall alumni contribution with $3.00 of it going 
for "Maryland" magazine. 

Please pass this message along to non-subscribers 




IT OUT NOW! 



yy> SECRETARY, ALUMNI ASSOCTXTION, 

ft% UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

* " fl " 

Enclosed herewith is $ my contribution to the 

Alumni Fund. $3.00 of this amount is for a subscription to "MARYLAND" 
for one year. 




Maryland 32; North Carolina St. 23 

aryland's cross country 
team lost its second 
, straight meet of the 
season losing to North 
.Carolina State 23 to 32 
(low score wins). 
Terp Ben Good paced 
the Maryland runners, finishing in 
third place. Other Terps to place in 
the top ten were Charlie Wagner, Jerry 
McGee and Paul Hower. 

Maryland 19; North Carolina 41 

Ben Good led the Terp cross coun- 
try squad across the finish line to 
defeat North Carolina 19-41. Larry 
Faass, Charlie Wagner, Jerry McGee, 
Paul Hower and Glip Goldstein crossed 
the tape in the first ten for the victory. 

Fresh Win I.C.C.A. Title 

Maryland's freshmen cross country 
team climaxed its undefeated season 
by winning the Freshmen I.C.A.A. 
Championship in New York. The 
team won with 56 points, to runner- 
up Pitt's 74. 

Fresh Burr Grimm crossed the fin- 
ish line fourth in a field of 125 con- 
testants from 25 colleges. Tommy 
New finished seventh and Carl Party 
came in eleventh for Maryland. 

This marks the first time a Mary- 
land team has ever placed in I.C.A.A. 
competition. 

Maryland 16; Duke 52 

Paced by Ben Good, the Maryland 
cross country team won a decisive 16- 
52 victory over the Duke Blue Devils. 
The Terrapin runners crossed the fin- 
ish line in eight of the first 10 posi- 
tions in handing Duke its first set- 
back in three starts. 

Good, who placed first in the four- 
mile course in 19 minutes 51 seconds, 
was followed by Charlie Waggner, 
Larry Faass and Paul Hower, all 
Terps, in that order. 

Maryland's freshmen team won its 
fourth straight meet in downing the 
Duke yearlings 15-52. 

Terps Win Triangular Meet 

Maryland's cross country team ended 
its season with five men crossing the 
finish line in a tie to give the Terps 
a 15-54-68 win over William and Mary 
and Richmond, respectively, in a tri- 
angular meet. 

Ben Good, Charlie Waggner, Paul 
Hower, Glip Goldstein and Jerry Mc- 
Gee broke the tape hand in hand to 
score the victory in a winning time of 
19 minutes and 27 seconds. 

Frank Dressen and Brian Parker 
placed eighth and ninth to give Mary- 
land seven of the first nine places. The 
win was Maryland's third against two 
defeats for the season. The Terps 
finished second in the Atlantic Coast 
conference behind champion North 
Carolina State. 

Track Coach Jim Kehoe turned in his 
usual A-l job; efficient and enthusi- 
astic. 



64 



"Maryland" 




A Light Forever Burning 

A Voice That Is Never Stilled 



Night comes on and spreads a blanket of darkness upon sleeping 
cities and towns. Here and there a lone policeman. In the distance a 
clock tolling the hour. 

In the dark silence of the night there is one light forever burning 
... a voice that is never stilled. 'I hat light is the liL;lit in the telephone 
exchange. That voice isihe voice of your telephone, ttsverj presence 
gives a feeling of security and of nearness to everyone. 

Whatever the need or the hour, the telephone i-« always readj to 
serve you— quickly, dependably, and at small cost. 

BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM jh. 

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VOL. XXV, NO. 2 



University, of -Maryland cAlumni Publication $5f toi ySTr Y 




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HAGERSTOWN, MARYLAND 



Vol. XXV 



March-April, 1954 



No. 2 







Published iti-Monihhi nt the University of 
Maryland, mui entered at the Post Office, 
College Parle, .\td.. as second class mail mat- 
ter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 
InT'.i. $3.00 per year — Fifty cents the copy. 



HARVEY. I,. MILLER, Managing Editor 

Director of Publications nn<l Publicity 

University of Maryland 

College Park, M<1. 



SAL 


A I* OGDISN, Advertising Director 




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nOpkins 7-0018 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Officers 

Dr. Albert K. Goldstein '12. President 
Col. O. H. Saunders '10, Vice-President 
J. Homer Remsberg '18, Vice-President 
David L. Brigham '38, Executive Secretary 

General Alumni Council 

AGRICULTURE— Lee W. Adkins '42, Ahrain 

/.. GottwalB '38, .T. Homer Remsberg "18. 
ARTS & SCIENCES— William H. Press '28, 

Mnrjorie R. Wharton '41, C. G. Donovan 

'17. 
BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION— 

Norman Sinclair '43, Ilarrv A. Roswell, Jr. 

'42. Roger L. Odette '52. 
DENTAL — Eugene L. Pessage, Jr. '40, Albert 

C. Cook '38. William E. Trail '26. 
EDUCATIOX — R. Louise Sudlow *50. Stewart 

McCaw '35. Florence L. Duke '50. 
ENGINEERING— S. Chester Ward '32, C. V. 

Koons '29, Col. O. IT. Saunders '10. 
HOME ECONOMICS — Katharine A. Longridge 

'29, Carolyn C. Ooppinger '30, Hilda Jones 

Ny Strom '32. 
LAW— Edwin lliirliu '34. G. Kenneth Relbllch 

'29. John G. Prendergast '33. 
MEDICAL— Albeit E. Goldstein *12. Thurs- 
ton R. Adams '34. William H. Triplett '11. 
PHARMACY— Frank ltlock '24, Frank Black 

'04, Benjamin F. Allen '37. 
NURSING — Flora Street '38, Eva Darley '27. 



Alumni Cluhs 

BALTIMORE— Win. II. Triplet!:, '11 
CARROLL COUNTY— Sherman IS. Flanagan, 

Sr. '24. 
CUMBERLAND— Dr. J. Russell Cook '23. 
EASTERN SHORE— Otis Twillv '21. 
"M" CLUB— Albert B. lleagv '30. 
NEW ENGLAND— R. A. I!. Cook '05. 
NEW YORK — Miss Sarnh E. Morris '24. 
PITTSBURGH— Gordon Kessler '29. 
PRTNCE GEORGE'S 1 CO. — Egherl Tlngley '27. 
RICHMOND— Paul Mnllinix '30. 
SCHENECTADY— Mrs. Marie Esber '45. 



Ex-Officio 

Past President— Dr. A. I. Bell '19 
Pasl President — T. T. Speer 17 

i ni\ <-rsi i \ President — Dr. II. c. Byrd '08 
Executive Secretary — David L. Brlgham '38 



THE COUPON ON THE 

LAST PAGE? 

PLEASE USE IT! 



DR. BYRD HONORED BY STATE, ALUMNI, FACUUT 



Two Testimonial Banquets 
Responsible For Built 

By JtaAoeq I. Millet 

The Board of Regents were hosts, in 
the College Park dining hall, at an 
"official" banquet in honor of Dr. Byrd, 
with Board of Regents chairman, Judge 
Wm. P. Cole, Jr., as Toastmaster. 

If Maryland undertook to print all 
the well deserved praises heaped upon 
Dr. Byrd, on this occasion, those pages, 
from cover to cover, would have space 
for nothing else. 

Hailing him a,s "one of the truly 
great Americans and great educators 
of our time," Governor Theodore R. 
McKeldin, former Governors W. Pres- 
ton Lane and Herbert R. O'Connor, 
spoke feelingly, convincingly, and at 
length upon the great abilities they 
had come to recognize in Maryland's 
outgoing president, not only as a great 
leader and talented organizer but also 
as a "salesman" who possessed the 
ability to attain for the University the 
funds needed to finance the program in 
the interests of the people of the state. 

Lauds Faculty 

In fashion typical of him Dr. Byrd 
stated that praise and appreciation 
rightfully belonged to the faculty which 
had so loyally and assiduously sup- 
ported him. 

"I have found," Dr. Byrd said, "that 
it is wise to have faith in human na- 
ture. Good and loyal workers will re- 
turn such faith." Ever modest, Dr. 
Byrd mentioned neither the personal 
leadership that enabled him to select 
the members of his "team" nor his 
personal example that established the 
pace for their efforts and support. The 
ability to do that constitutes the high- 
est facet of successful leadership. 

Dr. Byrd stressed as the two-fold 
policy of the University the institu- 
tion and administration of educational 
values demanded by the people of the 
state as well as the continuation of 
the sterling Americanism that, in the 
"Maryland way" is bound up in the 
liberal and free system identified with 
the State and its university. 

Strictly "U.S.A." 

"With those two policies in effect," 
Dr. Byrd said, "the University of 
Maryland will keep its feet on the 
ground as a great American institu- 
tion of learning and," he added, "we 
have the facultv that will keep it that 
way." 

The various speeches were in a 
reminiscent vein. Several speakers com- 
mented on Dr. Byrd's "able and per- 
suasive powers" when dealing for many 
years with the General Assembly on 
matters relating to the State univer- 
sity. 

In praising Byrd's dynamic leader- 
ship and his role in developing the 
university, Governor McKeldin observ- 



\i> I ribute I o I eadership 
linji Greal University 

ed, "Had the enthusiasm of its (the 
university's) direction been more In- 
tense, it might have approached the 
point of combustion." 
U. S. Senator John Marshal Butler 

in referring to "my good friend Cur- 
lev." noted "Dr. Byrd and the Univer- 
sity have always been sy imiiy in. ■ 

Former Governor Lane said, "I hope 
Byrd's leadership, genius, talent and 
tenacity will not he lost to the people 
of Maryland in the future." 

"I do wish that the university could 
have Dr. Byrd's services for a longer 
period in these critical times," said 
Governor McKeldin in the feature ad- 
dress. 

"1 know he will not rest on his 
laurels," the Governor went on to say, 
"and 1 know that he will make him- 
self available for counsel and advice 
to those who succeed him in the insti- 
tution's administration." 

"I never have known my friend, 
Curley Byrd, or his aides to run away 
from an argument or a touch of con- 
tention," Governor McKeldin continued. 

Governor's Praise 

Dr. Byrd's foresight and enthusiasm 
were eulogized by the Governor. 
"Twenty and 30 years ago, when Mary- 
land's future football prowess w - as un- 
dreamed of," he said, "no one en- 
visioned our university playing in the 
Sugar and Orange Bowls. 

"No one, that is, but a curly-headed 
young ex-player who then was hold- 
ing down three important jobs, at the 
university — football coach, director of 
athletics and assistant to the presi- 
dent." 

In addition to U. S. Senators Butler 
and Beall, Maryland Representatives in 
Congress Samuel Friedel, Edward Gar- 
metz, George Fallon, DeWitt Hyde, 
and Frank Small, Jr. were in attend- 




\\\\\\ fi 

Pi . 

Delia, III: Speakei of the II 

John C Lul i 
Pei i > 0. Wilkinson, < hail 

• Mimittee on I 

as State Senatoi l eoi I G 
\ at the alumni banq 
previously the feeling of warmth 
d< cp friendship wat again appari 
v. Inch, toi fleeted onlj 

high level of leadership 
familiarity without lowering the 
spect and esteem for the greal 
needed to attain such 

Concensus of opinio- 1 to In- 

that "Curley" Byrd'a succe ioi would 
inherit a "going concern" in th<- i 

veisity's Byrd-built faculty. 

Beautiful Tribute 

One had to be fortunate enough to 
be in attendance to fully appreciate 

the invocation by Dr. I lis L, Kaplan, 
of the Board of Regents. One of the 

nation's most distinguished .scholars, 
Or. Kaplan's prayer, forceful and 
short, was a masterpiece of rhetoric, 
viz: — 

"Father of all. we tharik Thee for 
tl't warmth of fellowship and spirit of 
reverence which attend our coming to- 
gether this ev< ning to demonstrate our 

affection and esteem to our distin- 
guished President, Dr. H. Clifton Byrd, 
a loyal friend and a gifted leader. We 
are grateful that we have had him in 
our midst so that through his efforts a 
generation of Marylanders and others 
hart had an opportunity of acquiring 
knowledge and gaining skills which 
might otherwise have been withheld 
from them. 

"In honoring him, we honor one irho. 
guided by Thi/ spirit, used Thy blessed 
gifts of mind and heart to become the 
architect of a great center of learning 
where understanding of human life and 
thought could be promoted and loyalty 
to our great democratic traditions of 
dom and justice deept ned. His lab- 
ors hare borne good fruit and today 
the University which he has served 
with the. utmost dedication in every 
Capacity from the humble to the most 
eminent, stands as a living monument 
to his creative imagination and practi- 
cal statesmanship. 

"1IY ash Thy continued blessings. O 
Lord, upon him as he is about to lay 
down tJir burdens of office which he 
administered as a sacred trust and as 
as labor of love. He Thou with him 
in all that he undertakes. Guard him 
from all mishap and disappointnu nt. 
Satisfy hint with long life and with 
unabated vigor that In man continue 

to serve Thei and all his fellow- 
I'Amen." 

Alumni Testimonial 
A capacity crowd of alumni and 
faculty attended the Dr. H. C. Byrd 
(Continued on Page 4) 



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HONORING DR. BYRD AT BOARD OF REGENTS BANQUET. 



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GREET DR. BYRD AT BOARD f)F REGENTS DINNER. MISS ADELE H. 
STAMP, DEAN OF WOMEN; MISS ALMA H. PREINKERT, PAST PRESI- 
DENT, MARYLAND FEDERATION OF WOMEN'S CLUBS; MRS. HARRY R. CHRISTOPHER, ALSO A PAST PRESIDENT. 



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(Cont',,,11, (i from Page 1) 

Testimonial Dinner at the Lord Bal- 
timore Hotel in Baltimore a week 
before the Board of Regents' testi- 
monial banquet. The event proved to 
be an impressive tribute to the Uni- 
versity's President as well as an ex- 
pression of appreciation by alumni and 
faculty, all of them conscious of the 
that they were honoring a great 
leader to whom all alumni and faculty 
owe debts of gratitude. 

While some members of the press 
sought opportunity to label the testi- 
monial as a sort of a political spring- 
board of gubernatorial implications and 
aspirations, the affair turned out to be 
exactly what it was meant to be, i.e., 
"a gathering of Curley's friends" in 
intimately warm and friendly tribute 
to a great leader who had set the pat- 
tern of diligent, intelligent, and toler- 
ant leadership by personal example in 
company with the loyalty downward 
needed to inspire loyalty upward. 
Honor To Leadership 

All present at the banquet realized 
that this event honored the man who 
had, by continuous and oftimes heroic 
effort, lifted a so-called cow college to 
the forefront of the nation's institu- 
tions of learning, an accomplishment 
which he had oftimes identified as the 
result of patience and plodding perse- 
verance in research, brilliance and me- 
thodical effort in teaching, as well as 
the virility needed to take education to 
the people in extension and that these 
qualities, plus the necessary rugged 
physical development had combined to 
build the present University of Mary- 
land. 

The guest of honor had oftimes ac- 
centuated that what had been accomp- 
lished was the result of the Board of 
Regents, the administration of the 
University over many years, the Fac- 
ulty, alumni, students, and many 
others interested in the varied services 
the University renders, pulling togeth- 
er as a team toward the common ob- 
jective of providing for the people of 
Maryland a state university devoted to 
the needs of the people and sufficiently 
resilient to meet the changes encount- 
ered. 

Governor Lane's Tribute 

What politics could be injected into 
the testimonial the audience well rec- 
ognized as the political acumen needed 
DJ any university president to accomp- 
lish the results with which Dr. Byrd 
has been properly credited in the inter- 
ests of the University's phenomenal 
expansion. Only a few nights previ- 
ously Dr. Byrd had paid tribute to 
former Governor W. Preston Lane as 
"the greatest govenor this State ever 
had, who gave the University more 
than any other governor in the historv 
of the state." 

Governor Lane replied, "Whatever I 
did for the university was only because 
of the explanations by Dr. Byrd of the 
benefits that would come to the people 
of Maryland. Without his advice and 
at times his urging, I might not have 
done much of anything." 



Talbot T. Speer, Class of '17, and 
chairman of the committee in charge, 
and lifelong friend of Dr. Byrd, likened 
the imprint that Dr. Byrd has placed 
on the university to the "shadow of 
Thomas Jefferson which extends across 
the campus of the University of Vir- 
ginia." 

"He," Mr. Speer said of the outgoing 
president, "has given the greatest serv- 
ice any head of any institution has 
ever given." 

The featured speaker at the Balti- 
more testimonial was the Very Rev. 
Kdward B. Bunn, S.J., President of 
Georgetown University, a native Bal- 
ti mo lean, who said of Dr. Byrd: 

"When you speak of the University 
of Maryland today, you speak of the 
institution of 'Curley' Byrd," and: 

"He is the creator of the University 
of Maryland." 

"Path Of Sunlight" 

He added that Dr. Byrd would not 
leave a shadow at all, but rather "a 
blazing path of sunlight always." 

He also referred to the epitaph on 
the statue of Chirstopher Wren in Lon- 
don's St. Paul's cathedral: "Si monu- 
mentuin requiris, circumspice," (If 
you would seek a monument, look 
about you). He then turned to the guest 
of honor and said, "Mr. President, 
the bricks and mortar of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland . . . will stand to 
you." 

Dr. Byrd paid tribute to many of his 
friends with, "A man achieves only 
what his friends are willing to help 
him achieve." 

He pointed out many of them in the 
dining room, including E. Brooke Lee, 
Democratic leader in Montgomery 
county; former Senator Millard E. 
Tydings; State Senators Louis Phipps 
and Louis L. Goldstein, and Glenn L. 
Martin. 

The out-going president told the 
alumni the University's "crowning ac- 
complishment of all will be known to 
you next spring when the accreditors' 
report is received." 

Foreign Program 

Dr. Byrd said he took great pride in 
the establishment of the foreign pro- 
gram, which is a part of the "greatest 
selling job in the history of the world," 
and aiding in the fight against Com- 
munism. He also reported that a leg- 
islative committee was told by the FBI 
that the University of Maryland "is 
freer of (Communist) influences than 
any of the universities of which they 
had knowledge." 

"The University is going to change 
to meet changing times, but there is 
one policy that must be maintained," 
Dr. Byrd emphasized. The University 
must always "integrate itself w*ith the 
needs of the people of the State." 

The Alumni Association presented 
the guest of honor a bound book of 
testimonial letters, headed by a letter 
from President Eisenhower in which 
he recalls that he and Dr. Byrd "were 
both football coaches (three decades 
ago) — you at the University of which 
you later became President, and, I at 
Fort Meadf." 



Following other tributes from Mr. 
Speer, Dr. A. E. Goldstein, president 
of the Alumni Association, co-chair- 
man, and Judge William P. Cole, chair- 
man of the Board of Regents, Dr. 
Byrd was presented with a Cadillac I 
automobile, made visible in an adjoin- 1 
ing room; a large portrait in oils of j 
himself painted by D. W. Stokes and 
unveiled by Dr. Byrd's granddaughter, 
Sterling Jackson. 

In planning the celebration, the 
alumni association, much of the work 
accomplished by Alumni Secretary 
David L. Brigham, hadn't missed a de- 
tail. Dr. John C. Krantz, School of 
Medicine, was Master of Ceremonies 
for the program which lasted three and 
a half hours. 

Vision, Circa '12 

In 1937, at a dinner in honor of Dr. 
Byrd, the late Dr. Levin B. Broughton, 
Dean of the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences, at the presentation of a gold 
watch to Dr. Byrd commemorating the 
ending of 25 years of service to the 
University as football coach, said, "My 
mind goes back to that day in Septem- 
ber, 1912, when Curley Byrd and I sat 
on the brow of the hill where the old 
cannon were and where we used to 
play football and baseball. A full 
moon was just coming up over the 
hills across the railroad tracks and I 
asked Curley what his objective was 
in coming out to take over coaching 
football in a college that had been the 
graveyard of other coaches, because 
the old Maryland Agricultural College 
had, seemingly, little to offer for a 
future, especially to a chap who seemed 
to be progressing well in the news- 
paper field. 

"Curley's reply was, I thought at 
the time, far-fetched. He said, 'Teach- 
ing English and History and coaching 
are just the beginning. We have a 
chance to build here a State institu- 
tion such as other states have, if we 
build it on a foundation of service to 
the people. It will take a long time, 
maybe a lifetime, but this old college 
that is here now has given me an edu- 
cation and to it I owe whatever I may 
become, or whatever I may do in life. 
To give my life to the college is only 
just, in that it will be a simple process 
of returning value for value received'." 

Brief Personal History 
Dr. H. C. Byrd, since 1935 respons- 
ible for the administration of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, was born in Cris- 
field, Somerset Countv, Maryland, 
February 12, 1889. 

His father was William B. Byrd and 
his mother was Sallie Sterling Byrd. 
His father was a member of the old 
Byrd family that came to this country 
in the Seventeenth Century. Dr. Byrd 
now has in his possession two deeds 
for land given to one of his ancestors 
iii England in the Fourteenth Century. 
His mother's father came from the 
Sterlings of Scotland and was the 
daughter of Julia Tyler Sterling, of 
Virginia, a descendant of President 
Tyler. Dr. Byrd's father was th« 
{Continued on Page 55) 



"Maryland" 



Dr. Thos. B. Symons New President 

Former Head of College of Agriculture and Extension, 

Lifelong Friend and Colleague of Dr. Byrd, Heads 

University of Maryland. 



The University of Maryland's Board 
of Regents named Dr. Thomas B. 
Symons to be acting president of the 
University to succeed Dr. H. C. Byrd, 
Chairman of the Board, Judge William 
P. Cole, Jr., announced after a meet- 
ing of the Board. 

The Board's selection was by unani- 
mous vote. 

"I am very happy to have the honor 
to serve the University again," Dr. Sy- 
mons said, adding, "I am very inter- 
ested in the University getting a big 
man for the presidency. I think it is 
v< -ry wise to survey the field before 
making a final decision." 

"With the cooperation of Dr. Byrd, 
the faculty and students, and under 
;he guidance of the Board of Regents, 
[ hope to conduct the work of this in- 
vitation as satisfactorily and efficient- 
y as possible," Dr. Symons added. 

Judge Cole said it was understood 
;hat Dean Symons would resign the 
post when a new permanent selection 
was made. 

"Happy Solution" 

Judge Cole described Dr. Symons' 
ippointment as a "happy solution" to 
;he regents' problem. 

Dr. Byrd explained that Dr. Symons 
will have free rein in running the uni- 
versity. He said that he hoped to be 
able to pass on the secret of his suc- 
cess in continually expanding the uni- 
versity. 

"What the regents want is to have 
ne here with the new administration 
so that we can continue without dis- 
rupting the policies that have been so 
successful in building the university 
ind its connections with the State and 
Federal Governments. 

Lauds Older People 

"However, the present has no right 
;o impose its ideas — without modifica- 
;ion — on the future. In other words, I 
im just going to be a good assistant 
;o Dr. Symons." 

Dr. Symons said he was going to be 
very careful to give equal interest to 
svery phase of the university and that 
le also would like to do something 
ibout the problems of old people. He 
said greater stress should be placed 
m preparing college students for old 
ige. 

"We are neglecting the terrific re- 
sources in the millions in this country 
now over 65 years of age," Dr. Symons 
said. 

Regarding his predecessor, Dr. Sy- 
nons said: 

"Dr. Byrd has done a wonderful job 
lere for many years. I don't believe 
any one can really fill his shoes, but 
I'm going to do my best." 

Dr. Symons, then Dean of the Col- 
ege of Agriculture, and director of the 

"Maryland" 



Extension Service, retired in I960, at' 

ter 48 years of continuous service al 
the University. 

No individual in Maryland IS be 
lieved to have contributed as much as 

Dr. Symons in the last half-cent wry 

to the state's agricultural prosperity. 
The main College of Agriculture 

Building was named "Symons Hall" in 
his honor. 

Eastern Shoreman 

Born on a 240-acre farm at Kaston 
on September 2, 1880, he was gradu- 
ated from the Maryland Agricultural 
College, out of which the University 
of Maryland grew. He received his 
master's degree three years later and 
an honorary doctorate in 1918. 

Starting as an entomologist, follow- 
ing his graduation, his ability for 
leadership and organization was soon 
apparent. 

As State entomologist during a peri- 
od in the early 1900's, when the San 
Jose scale threatened the orchard in- 
dustry of Maryland, he demonstrated 
pruning and spraying methods through- 
out the State. 

So successful were his efforts that 
he was made the first secretary of the 
State Horticultural Society. Other 
groups were formed to promote specific 
phases of farming. All were finally de- 
veloped into the Maryland Agricultur- 
al Society, of which Dr. Symons was 
secretary and treasurer. 

Directed Extension 

In 1912, Dr. Symons was made Dean 
of the School of Horticulture which 
post he held for three years, being 
named director of the Extension Serv- 
ice in 1914. 

Much of Dr. Symons success stemmed 
from his ardent love of people, espe- 
cially rural people, and an intense de- 
sire to render for them every possible 
service. 

This kept him in close touch with 
agricultural activities throughout the 
State through most of the last half- 
century. 

He continuously encouraged his fel- 
low workers to accept responsibilities 
in various organizations to keep them 
intimately informed on the agricultur- 
al problems of the State. 

His guidance was sought through 
the years in the formation and later 
development of numerous agricultural 
associations, including dairy co-opera- 
tives in Baltimore and Washington and 
the Maryland Tobacco Growers' Asso- 
ciation. 

He was especially active in two maj- 
or farm organizations in the State, the 
Grange and the Farm Bureau. 

"Self-help is the best help," is a 
Symons axiom. 




MARYLAND PRESIDENT 

Dr. Thos. it. sum oiin. former Dean of the 
College «/ Agriculture, lift >',im friend u,ni 
colleague o] i>r. II O. Byrd, succeed* lattet 
as President o] ' niversity o) Maryland. 



Besides being aggressive in organi- 
zations throughout the State, he took 
an active part in affairs of national 
farm organizations. 

For a number of years he served as 
chairman of the Extension Committee 
on Organization and Policy of the Land 
Grant College Association, and also 
served on many committees of the 
association. 

For several years he was chairman 
of a subcommittee on forestry. In 
cooperation with the National Asso- 
ciation of State Foresters, he spear- 
headed efforts which led to the enact- 
ment of the forestry bill in Congress. 

Honored By Farm Bureau 

In recognition of his national serv- 
ices, the American Farm Bureau Fed- 
eration awarded him its Distinguished 
Service Medal for outstanding contri- 
bution in the field of agriculture. 

Since its inception in 1937, Dr. Sy- 
mons was chairman of the Maryland 
State Soil Conservation Committee, 
was a member of the State Planning 
Commission. 

He was a member of the Executive 
Committee and Board of Directors of 
the Eastern Livestock Show; treas- 
urer of the Maryland Agricultural So- 
ciety; a member of the State Produc- 
tion and Marketing Committee, United 
States Department of Agriculture; the 
State Commission on Inter-racial Re- 
lations, and the Executive Committee 
and Board of the Maryland Farm 
Bureau. 

A very l>us\ man he, nonetheless. 
found time to help Ids community and 




4 t 



I * 



CRRILLOniC BELLS 

BRACE THE TOWER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYUHD CHAFEL 

This carillon installation gives the listening ear all the perfectly 
balanced and accurately matched tones of the carillon bells of 
Flanders with a 61-note Flemish-type instrument, played manu- 
ally. In addition, a 25-note English-type instrument, equipped 
with automatic controls, will be used to play college tunes at pre- 
determined hours. 

In whatever program planned for their use the bells will lift the 
hearts of those who hear, adding spiritual tone to the campus. 

An exclusive product of 

SCHULMERICH CARILLONS, INC. 39249 CARILLON HILL, SELLERSVILLE, PA. 



THE HOME OF 7 HOUR SERVICE 

DRIVE- 




PULASKI HIGHWAY AT ERDMAN AVENUE 
BRoadwoy 6-6600 

LAUNDRY, DRY CLEANING, FUR STORAGE, RUG CLEANING 
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



church, being past president of the 
College Park Rotary Club, a vestryman 
of St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, a 
member of the Rotary Club of Prince 
Georges county and the Beltsville 
Grange, and secretary of the Vansville 
Farmers Club. 

A Mason, he also holds membership 
in Gamma Alpha and Epsilon Sigma 
Phi fraternities. 

He directed the activities of county 
agricultural agents and home demon- 
stration agents in each county of the 
State, plus a large force of specialists 
steadily grappling with problems in 
all phases of Maryland agriculture. 
Fostered Team Work 

Dr. Symons considered his biggest 
contribution over the last half-century 
to cooperation created between farm 
organizations and Federal agricultural 
agencies, striving steadily "to bind 
them together to work as a team." 

He has ever been alert against "con- 
flicts and jealousies which create fric- 
tions that slow down efforts for ad- 
vancement." 

Dr. Byrd said of Dr. Symons, his 
lifelong friend and colleague, "He con- 
tributed more to Agriculture and to 
the University of Maryland than any 
other man." 

Symons Hall 

When Symons Hall was dedicated 
Dr. Bvrd said, "You have not only 
erected to yourself a monument of 
brick and stone, but have erected a 
much more enduring monument in the 
indelible imprint you leave on the 
hearts of those who have benefited by 
what you have done." 

Former Senator Millard E. Tydings 
said of Dr. Symons, "I never knew a 
man who gave more of himself." 

During the last three years Dr. Sy- 
mons has been Director of Public Re- 
lations for the Suburban Trust Com- 
pany, from which institution he has 
been granted leave of absence. 

He is married and the father of 
three daughters, all Maryland gradu- 
ates. 

University Theatre 

Three students were tapped by the 
Maryland chapter of the National Col- 
legiate Players honorary society. 

The three selected -were Ruth Bau- 
man, Barbara Ann Bennett, and Mary 
Margaret Meuller. 

Miss Bauman, a senior in Arts and 
Sciences, was chosen for her back- 
stage work. 

Miss Bennett, a senior in Arts and 
Sciences, has worked as costume chair- 
man, props chairman, house chairman, 
and sound chairman. 

Miss Mueller, senior in Education, 
was chosen not only for her work back- 
stage, but also on-stage. 

The show, "Dear Ruth" left on a 
tour of Air Force Bases in Iceland, 
Bermuda, and the Azores. 

Rhea Mermelstein plavs the title 
role, supported by Judith Spencer, 
Paul Seltzer, Gordon Becker, Dave 
Singleton, and Eleanor Weinstein. 

Others in the cast include Rheda 
Greenberg, Leoma Naughton, Joe Ma- 
ratta, and Dick Watt. 



"Maryland" 




THAT TORE IT 



Pictured is the olimaoUc play of the Orange Bowl oame, in which Larry Qtigg, Oklahoma halj 
back, in shown sighting in on the goal Hm- n« he pivots to wrest himsel 0} Dick Nolan's 

tackle in the second period. Origg's momentum carried him fust far enough to pet the touch- 
down that upset the previously unbeaten Terrapins, ranked \o. 1 in tlie Notion. That thar 

white .str-i/it is the goal line, durn it! 



BERNIE I U.nM.I 



i><, an 111 itiam 

Stood a httir mnii who was not there. 
Hi watn'i there on Vev fear't Day. 
That's how the scoreboard got that way. 



Maryland Nosed Out In Orange Bowl 




aryland's football team, 
1963 National cham- 
pions, coached by 
Maryland's Jim Tatum, 
1953 coach of the year, 
(so elected by fellow 
coaches), bowed to 

Oklahoma, 7-0, in the Orange Bowl. 

The sports world has reviewed every 

angle of that upset, "sugared" with 

quinine. Defeat is never permanent. 

Victory is compounded from defeats. 

Defeat is bitter only if you choose to 

swallow it. 

A Means To An End 

With all due credit to the emphasis 
placed on a great sports achievement 
like being chosen the No. 1 team or 
even being invited to participate in a 
bowl game, one angle should not be 
obtunded. It might as well be stressed 
in the pages of Maryland, the maga- 
zine of a proud alumni. It is, that no 
matter how great a sports victory, the 
University of Mai-yland, its reason for 
existing being EDUCATION, accom- 
plishes regularly, on the College Park 
and Baltimore campuses, victories that 
greatly exceed in importance anything 
that could happen on the not unim- 
portant playing fields of the Univer- 
sity. Athletics are a means to an end. 
Important, popular and colorful, yes, 
but after all a supporting part of the 
education of America! 

So what ? So Maryland, a great team 
under a great coach, was barely 
oontzed out of a ball game. 

"Maryland" 



Terps' No. 1 Team Shaded 
By Oklahoma, 7-0 

Maryland alumni need not go back 
very far into the recesses of memory, 
before Tatum, to recall when Terp 
teams didn't even dream in terms of 
bowl invitations. 

What other school has two national 
titles for 1953? Maryland won one in 
football and one in rifle. 

When the boxing team was invited 
to the '48 Sugar Bowl, Maryland's first 
bowl bid in any sport, there were those 
among us who were not so sure Mary- 
land had anything to gain by accept- 
ing. (Incidentally the Terps won from 
Michigan State). 

No Crying Towel 

Here, in the pages of the alumni 
news, would also be the ideal spot for 
crying towel alibis for the 1 touch- 
down set back at the hands of Okla- 
homa. However, we'll do scant weep- 
ing here if for no other reason than 
that no one at Maryland wishes to 
reach the nadir of writing at which a 
certain Chicago sports writer wal- 
lowed in this, "Oklahoma will run those 
southern jerks into the stands" and 
"St. Mary's Girls School could have 
won on Maryland's schedule." 

To take the nation's No. 1 team, 
with the No. 1 coach, minus the injured 
No. 1 player, and see it defeated as a 
result of pediculous "breaks" provides 
a great human interest story. 

Alibis? They were obvious. Here 
are several from responsible non- 




R4U 7UU, Voa 

aryland is the only 
university in the na- 
tion to have, for 
1953, won two na- 
tional titles. While 
reams have been 
written about the 
football title let's 
not overlook the outstanding nation- 
al championship win in early 1953 
by the Maryland Rifle Team, shoot- 
ing a record-breaking score of 1442 
points out of a possible 1500 in com- 
petition against 132 colleges firing 
on 16 different campus ranges. 

The record set by the Maryland 
team broke the 1437 high score set 
by Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology in 1951. 

Previous Maryland teams had 
won the national title in 1947 and 

1949 and were runner up in 1948, 

1950 and 1952, barely nosed out by 
fractions due to the lesser score in 
the standing position. 



Maryland news commentators, viz: 

Shirley Povich, Pulitzer prize win- 
ning columnist, wrote in the Wash- 
ington Post, "Would it have been dif- 
ferent with Faloney in there? I think 
so. Without him, Maryland had no 
take-charge guy and there were se- 
quences when what the Terrapins 
needed most was a swift kick in the 
posterior. 

(Continued on Page 51) 



A CAMPUS OF FIVE MILLION SQUARE MILES 




Mr. Martin 



By. [Jolm # Mcuitat 

To be a dean of a college at a large 
American university involves many 
administrative and academic problems, 
but to be dean of a college whose cam- 
pus stretches over 5 million square 
miles, from the ice capped Arctic to 
the sand dunes of Saudi Arabia, is a 
ation that is found under the guid- 
ance and direction of Dean Ray Eh- 
sberger, head of the College of Spe- 
cial and Continuation Studies (CSCS) 
at the University of Maryland. 

Maryland's far reaching program in- 
clude only extensive state-side 

participation, but 
the University pro- 
vides educational fa- 
cilities extending 
from as far north 
as Thule, Greenland 
to the tropical cli- 
mate of Asmara, 
Ethiopia, and the 
desert sands of 
Dhahran, Saudi 
Arabia in the Mid- 
dle East. 

The University of- 
fers courses at 
eighty-rive educational centers over- 
seas which are located in sixteen coun- 
tries and at approximately forty cent- 
ers in the Stateside program. Seventy- 
six of the centers overseas are in the 
■pean area of operation, with the 
remaining nine centers being located 
in the North Atlantic program. At 
present approximately 4,800 students 
are registered in the overseas pro- 
gram. The Stateside enrollment lists 
4,000 students in off campus courses. 
Together these figures represent a 
total greater than the campus at Col- 
lege Park. Whereas students at the 
University proper register twice a 
year, registration is usually held five 
times for CSCS enrollees overseas and 
off campus. 

Maryland The Pioneer 

From 1949 to 1953, in the overseas 
program alone, the University of Mary- 
land CSCS courses had a total course 
enrollment of 58,791 in which 22,467 
individual students were registered. 

Maryland is the pioneer in provid- 
ing such far reaching educational fa- 
cilities overseas. In 1947, the program 
was initiated at the Pentagon and has, 
at the request of the various military 
commands, been extended to the cur- 
rently located overseas centers listed 
below: 

lustria i. in/. Salzburg, st. Johann, Vlen- 
ii. -i. 

England Bentwaters. Prize Norton, Bur 
tonwood, Bush] i':ni,. Chelveston, Chlcksands, 
Greenham Common, Lindholm, Man 
Bton, MUdenhall Molesworth, Scampton, Scul 
tborpe, Sealand, Shaftesbury, Shephi 
Qrove, Smith Rulsllp, Upper Heyford, \\.-i 
• ii Wethersfield, W liiridge. 

/ thlopla Lamara, 

Frand Bordeauj Bussac, Chateauroux, 
Fontaiiu-hleaii, Liion, Metz, Orleans, Orley 
Field, Paris, Verdun. 

8 



University of Maryland Overseas Program Extends 
From Arctic Snows To Desert Sands of Arabia 



French Morocco — Nouasseur, Rabat. Sldl 
Sllmane. 

Germany Augsburg, Bad Krenznach, Bad 
Nauheim, Bamberg, Baumholder, r.oriin. Birk- 
enfeld, Bltburg, Brdlng, Frankfurt, Main, 
Freising, Furstenfeldbruck, Glessen, llahu. 
i. Heidelberg Kaiaerslautern, I.ands- 
berg, Landstuhl, Munich, Nurnberg, Ram- 
Bteln, Rheln/Maln, Sembach, Stuttgart, Dim, 
\ ogelweh, Wiesbaden, Wurzburg. 

Oreect a>th< ne 

Greenland — Sondrestrom, Nursarssuak, 
Thule. 

la kind — Keflavik. 

Italy — Leghorn. 

Labradoi Goose Bay, AC and W Site. 

Libya — Tripoli. 

Heu-uiiiiulliiiid — Pepperrell (St. Johns), 
Harmon, McAndrew. 

Saudi A rabia — Dhahran. 

Scotland — Prestwlck, Renfrew. 

Turkey- — Ankara. 

Guest Of Military 

The University is a guest of the mili- 
tary and is an independent organiza- 
tion in cooperation with the Armed 
Forces. 

The overseas program could not be 
made to work without the assistance 
of the Information and Education (I. 
and E.) Division of the Armed Forces. 
The problems of students in the various 
overseas centers are taken first to the 
I. and E. officers, or civilian advisers 
who gives important assistance in con- 
nection with surveying the course needs 
of students, publicizing offerings, reg- 
istering students, providing class- 
rooms, assisting in the reproduction of 
quizzes to be given, arranging for quar- 
ters for teachers, and many other mat- 
ters. 

Every center at which the University 
of Maryland offers work has an I. and 
E. office. Dr. Ehrensberger summed 
up the importance of such Service as- 



sistance saying: "The University's 
overseas program could not operate 
without the excellent cooperation of 
the I. and E. personnel, both military 
and civilian advisers." 

Others Follow 

Since Maryland undertook the job of 
providing education to other parts of 
the world outside its immediate cam- 
pus area, other universities have fol- 
lowed Maryland's initiative, but have 
not equalled her CSCS program in the 
extensiveness of such an operation. 

The faculty members of this over- 
seas division of CSCS are selected from 
the College Park Campus or from 
among those college professors who 
are on leave of absence from other uni- 
versities to study or travel abroad. All 
instructors are appointed and assigned 
to the overseas faculty by the Dean 
and Head of Department administer- 
ing the particular area of study on the 
College Park campus. 

Quality of instruction and the main- 
tenance of academic standards are con- 
stantly stressed by each department. 
To insure these high standards each 
Head of Department designates one of 
his appointed overseas professors as a 
personal representative to act on mat- 
ters relating to departmental policy. 
Close liaison between the overseas de- 
partment representative and the Head 
of Department at College Park, is 
maintained. 

Each instructor carries a collection 
of approved books for collateral read- 
(Continued on Page 62) 




WARMING UP BEFORE CLASSES 

A University of Maryland class at Thule Air Force Base. Greenland. This class is located 
2,500 miles from College Park but only 900 miles from the North Pole. 

"Maryland" 



Jbr. £yrd'3 Pland 

Upon opening his campaign head- 
quarters at the Emerson Hotel in 
Baltimore, Dr. H. C. Byrd, candidate 
for the Democratic nomination for Gov- 
ernor of Maryland, stated that he had 
been assured he would cany at least 
20 of the 23 counties in the Democratic 
primary. 

Pledging an active and aggressive 
campaign, Dr. Byrd stated: "I have 
talked to hundreds of Democrats from 
all sections of the State. They assure 
me that the voters will give me sub- 
stantial majorities in at least 20 of 
23 counties." 

"In Baltimore City," Dr. Byrd went 
on to say, "I have received encourag- 
ing — even surprising support in every 
District." 

His statement also read: 

"I plan to campaign vigorously in 
every county and district of the State 
and am looking forward to seeing prac- 
tically all of the people. 

"During the campaign I shall discuss 
the issues as I see them and there will 
be presented a complete program for 
the betterment of our State's affairs. 

"As a part of my campaign I plan 
to ask many of the Democratic party 
members to serve on important com- 
mittees. These committees will be ap- 
pointed so that in them will be pre- 
sented all elements of the party. The 
campaign that I plan will get into 
high gear immediately." 



School of 



Dentistry 

Dr. Jos. C. Biddix 
. Gardner P. H. Foley 

Major Baido Killed In Action 

In a 1951 issue Maryland announced 
Jimmy Baido as a probable casualty 
of the Korean War. A 1952 issue con- 
tained a report from Chaplain Hoehn 
of the 31st Infantry on Jimmy's last 
known experience in the combat area. 
In conclusion Chaplain Hoehn wrote, 
"It is clear that no other report can 
be made than that Major Baido is 
missing in action. I suggest that you 
avoid coming to any conclusion as to 
his being dead or captured." From 
this report Jimmy's friends gained a 
feeling of hope. When his classmates 
met to celebrate their fifth reunion 
in June of 1951, they paid a warm 
tribute to Jimmy by the expression 
of their great concern for his safety. 
They decided to put their faith in the 
forlorn possibility that the name of 
Major Baido might at some bright fu- 
ture date appear on one of the prisoner 
lists issued by the Communist forces. 
Now it is the very regrettable duty 
of Maryland to make a third and final 
report on Major James Baido. the 
only alumnus of the B.C.D.S. to lose 
his life in the Korean War. When the 



10 



American prisoners of war were re- 
leased by the Communists, they were 
interrogated to obtain information 
about other missing persons. A re- 
patriated soldier stated that he knew 
Major Baido and that he was killed 
in action on November 27, 1950 near 
the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea 
from gunshot. Other officers who knew 
Major Baido stated that he was riding 
in a convoy of the advance section of 
Medical Company, 31st Infantry, when 
the convoy was ambushed and attacked 
by the Communists. Most of the men 
in his section of the medical convoy 
were killed. 

The name of Major James Baido has 
been added to the Roll of Honor that 
was placed in the entrance hall of his 
alma mater during World War II when 
he was a student. Jimmy has joined a 
memorable company of fellow alumni — 
Alexander, Feindt, Friedberg, Gorsuch, 
Trojakowski, and Wieland — who gave 
their lives in the service of their coun- 
try. Killed in Action in Korea — these 
words tell the final chapter in the life 
of a fine fellow who was an excellent 
representative of his School and his 
profession. 

Student Government Flourishes 
The Student Senate, which has be- 
come an important factor in student 
life, was organized in March, 1952. 
Prior to this time, the Student Activ- 
ity Committee, composed of four stu- 
dents and five faculty representatives, 
served as the student government of 
the School. Realizing that the Student 
Activity Committee served in a lim- 
ited capacity, Dr. Marion W. McCrea, 
Dr. J. Ben Robinson, and Mr. Gardner 
P. H. Foley promoted the idea of a 
more active student government. It 
was through the untiring efforts of 
these faculty members that our present 
Student Senate was organized. In its 
infancy, the Senate was composed of 
the president, vice-president, and secre- 
tary of each class. This group, under 
the supervision of Dr. McCrea, Dr. 
Robinson, and Mr. Foley, organized 
the first Student Senate and wrote its 
constitution and by-laws. 

Activity Budget 
One of the outstanding accomplish- 
ments of last year's Senate was the 
formulation of a budget for the stu- 
dent activity fee, which is paid by the 
students each year. Through this bud- 
get, the money is allocated for various 
student affairs, such as dances, ath- 
letics and publications. Prior to the 
formulation of this budget, the stu- 
dent funds were allocated by the faeu- 
ty for the various activities as the 
money was needed and there was no 
formal budget. 

To be sure, one of the predominant 
accomplishments of last year's Senate 
was that of formulating a budget, but 
many other worthy accomplishments 
were also realized: 

1. Publication of a calendar for the 
student social activities. 

2. Organization of intramural ath- 
letic programs. 

3. Publication of a Student Direc- 
tory. 



4. Changing of locker locations for 
freshmen and sophomores so as to 
eliminate congestion. 

5. Procurement of certain clinic 
items without charge for the juniors 
and seniors. 

6. Installation of anti-splashers for 
the lavatories in the clinic. 

7. Increase of the student activity 
fee so that all classes would have more 
money for their individual dances. 

It is needless to say that the above 
improvements were very beneficial to 
every member of the student body. 
From a financial standpoint, the stu- 
dents enjoyed a very pleasurable year 
and yet the expenditures stayed with- 
in the budget. 

Considering the many and varied 
actions of last year's Senate and the 
many changes that the current Sen- 
ate is accomplishing, it is evident that 
the students are beginning to express 
their opinions in regard to the various 
problems that arise in School. From 
all indications, the problems are being 
handled in a very democratic way. It 
is because of the Student Senate that 
a definite student government is being 
realized at the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery. The students and 
faculty alike are realizing the im- 
portant service that the Senate can 
contribute as a liaison between the 
students and the faculty. 

Alumni Breakfast 

The Twenty-second Annual Post- 
graduate Clinic of the District of Co- 
lumbia Dental Society will be held 
March 14-17, at the Shoreham. Of par- 
ticular interest to our alumni who will 
attend the meeting are the plans now 
being effected for the University of 
Maryland Breakfast that will be held 
in the Shoreham Hotel at 8 a.m. on 
March 16. Dr. Melvin Hazen Colvin 
'28, of 435 Seventh Street, S.W., Wash- 
ington, is in charge of the arrange- 
ments for this feature of the pro- 
gram that should be largely attended 
by the alumni of the Maryland, District 
of Columbia, and Virginia area. 

In addition to the customary regis- 
tered clinics the meeting will include 
table clinics, topic discussions, visual 
education, commercial exhibits, and a 
section devoted to the recent develop- 
ments in dental research. Dr. Lewis 
Fox '27, of South Norwalk, Conn., will 
present a clinic on "Periodontia." 

Chairmen, Class Reunions 

1904 — The returning graduates of the 
fifty-year groups will be the guests 
at the National Alumni Association 
at its annual dinner at the Lord Bal- 
timore Hotel on the evening of June 
4. Dr. Daniel E. Shehan, Medical 
Arts Building, Baltimore 1, is in 
charge of the arrangements. The re- 
union dinners of all other classes will 
be held on the night of June 3. 

1909— C. Alfred Shreeve, 503 Evesham 
Ave., Baltimore 12. 

(Joint reunion of the B.C.D.S., U. 
of Md., and B.M.C. Classes). 

1914— U. of Md.— J. Ben Robinson. 
West Virginia University School of 

"Maryland' 






1 






Dentistry, Morgantown, W. Va. 

B.C.D.S.— Howard Van Natl a. 
Medical Arts Building, Baltimore 1. 
1919— U. of Md.— Arthur I. Bell, Medi 
cal Arts Building, Baltimore 1. 

B.C.D.S. — George M. Anderson, 
Northway Apts., 3700 N. Charles 
Street, Baltimore 18. 
1 1924— James W. McCarl, Medical Cen- 
ter, Greenbelt, Md. 
1929— Kyrle W. Preis, 700 Cathedral 
Street, Baltimore 1. 
' 1934— Jesse Trager, 3300 Garrison 
Boulevard, Baltimore 16. 
1939— Edward R. Stinebert, Medical 
Arts Building, Baltimore 1. 
; 1944 — Conrad L. Inman, Jr., Medical 
Arts Building, Baltimore 1. 
1949— Theodore Leizman, 6711 New 
Hampshire Ave., Takoma Park, Md. 



College of 



Home Economics 

Ruth Lee Thompson Clark and 
- Ella M. Fazzalari 



Three Sisters 

Three daughters of Mr. and Mrs. 
Culver S. Ladd are enrolled in the 
College of Home Economics. Lorene is 
a Senior majoring in Practical Art, 
Sally is a Sophomore who plans to 
study Foods and Nancy is a freshman 
who thinks she will major in Clothing. 

The three sisters are all members of 
Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority. Each 
will live at home two years and have 
two years experience living in the 
Sorority House. 

Nancy won the Washington Flour, 
Wilkens Rogers Milling Co. Scholar- 
ship for her work in High School. 




AL DANEGGEK, U. OF M. PHOTO 

HOME EC SISTERS 

Left to right — Sally, Lorene and Nancy 
Ladd, three sisters, wlio arc students in the 
University of Maryland College of Home Eco- 
nomics as, respectively, sophomore, senior, 
and freshman. 

The sisters are examining some of the work 
which is being prepared for the Annual Fab- 
ric Festival of the Department of Textiles 
and Clothing. 



Mr. and Mrs. Culver Ladd live in 

Silver Spring, Maryland. Both work 
for the government where Mr. Ladd 

is a chemist. 

Mrs. I. add was a teacher of Hume 

Economics before her marriage ami for 

senile time after that. 

Culver s. Ladd, Jr., a brother, grad 

nated from the University of Maryland 
in June L958. His field was Physical 

Science. 

Personal Notes 

Mr. and Mrs. Claude Webb (Sue 
Cushing) moved from Silver Spring, 
Md. to Elkton, Md. They have two boys 
and a girl. 

Mr. and Mis. James Kehoo (Bar- 
bara England) have a new baby girl 
named Mary Lou. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Kemper (Dottie 
Wailes) have a baby girl born in Oc- 
tober and named Diane Shipley. 

Mrs. Clifford Little (Edith Rae Spar- 
ling) '39 opened her own Interior 
Decorating Shop February 12 at 46 Hi 
East West Highway, Bethesda, Md. 
Interiors, Inc., will be the only store 
of this nature in Bethesda. 

Mr. and Mrs. James McKay (Mary 
Ann Hunter) have moved from Bethes- 
da to 14 Quincv Street, Chevy Chase, 
Md. 

Mrs. Samuel Spicer (Gertrude Mc- 
Rae) is taking an active part in the 
Montgomery County Polio Organiza- 
tion. Her son recovered from bulbar 
polio this past summer, and she be- 
came vitally interested in the work 
then. 

In Sumner, Md. 
Mr. and Mrs. William Doores (Mari- 
anna Grogan) have moved from "Be- 
thesda to Sumner, Md. Hill is in the 
Radio Advertising Field. 

Mr. and Mrs. Heise (Jackie Morely) 
had a baby girl in November named 
Liane. 

Mr. and Mrs. Schaeffer (Liza Rig- 
gins) moved from D. C. to 13519 126th 
Street, Queens, New York City, N. Y. 
Her husband is working with the 
United Press. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jacobsen (Robin Kear- 
ney) are living in London, England. 
Her husband is an exchange student 
from Yale studying at the London 
Architectural School. 

Ruth Richmond Chenault and her 
husband who is an Army Officer are 
living in Ecuador. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Stedman (Jay- 
Andrea) '44, are living in Stuttgart, 
Germany. Bill is the American Con- 
sulate General. Previous diplomatic 
assignments have been in Buenos 
Aires and San Jose, Costa Rico. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Kephart (Mary- 
Ann Griffith) are living in Tokyo, 
Japan. Their address is Officers Mail 







FOR VIRGIN1 \ 

fn i in i ./ hi. i,. •■ U Ifaui ten ■ ophc 

linili III III, nli I 

Stat, u< I Irginia tfl thi nationa 

queen beau 

i he national ■ onU I u a ■ , ""' 

ill Mm mi. 

i in conti I outh Re 

search I oundation ■ ' V and n 

quired u 250-toord them* on "What Uy Ool 
lege Education \i • mi i to Hi " 

Bess !/■ ■•'" raon, Ifi a o} 19 15, < ur 

rently running a television show, acted a 
lunula fudge. 

Maureen was our ni sis Una "" 

State of Virginia Even though Virginia 
dents, then could in attending school any 
where in the United Stati 

I hU8, n Mm nliliiil COI ■' I '■ ■! " " 

Virginia queen. 

Maureen was n princess In tin Oherry 
Blossom Festival in Washington In 1952 
That sunn year sin was runner up i» "" 
Miss Washington contest. She rode «» the 
District Hunt in I'n sidi nt 1 l '"■ 

augural parade. She is long chairman tor 
Pi Beta Phi sorority and Is ti 
Association of Women Students nu campus. 

She is engaged tu Dick Chambers, a /.',v/'. 1. 
senior student "' Maryland, sin is u gradu 
ate of St. Vary's Icademy fn Holandric, 
1 irginia. 



Room, Box 999, APO 925, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Schafer (Shir- 
lex Bennett) have a new son horn No- 
vember 26, 1953 and named William 
Edgar. 

Mr. William Wyman, on the staff of 
the Practical Art Department had an 
exhibition of his contemporary cera- 
mics during December at his home. 

Phi Alpha Phi 
Alice Phillips, a senior in Home Eco- 
nomics Education, was elected into the 
rational scholastic honorary Phi Kappa 
Phi and initiated January 12. Miss 
Faye Mitchell, Head of the Depart- 
ment of Textiles and Clothing was hon- 
ored as a faculty member elected to 
membership in this organization. 

The Annual Fabric Festival present- 
ed by the Department of Textiles and 
Clothing was a very successful event 
during January in spite of the very in- 
clement weather which appeared at 
the same time. Mis s Beth Peterson, 
Home Economics with the Dupont Co. 
gave very generously of her time both 
in speaking to the guests and in an- 
swering questions. 



"Maryland" 



11 



School of 



Nursing 

Barbara Ardis 



'53 Banner Year 

The year 1953 was a banner one for 
the School of Nursing. Having been 
selected as a regional school in 1952, 
the nursing school began taking its 
place very actively in January 1953 
with other selected regional schools in 
the South, such as Vanderbilt, Emory, 
Texas, North Carolina, and Alabama. 

In January 1953, the School of Nurs- 
ing became an institutional member of 
the Baccalaureate and Higher Degree 
division of the National League for 
Nursing. 

In February 1953, President Byrd 
and the Board of Regents approved 
Public Health affiliation for all students 
with Baltimore City Health Depart- 
ment. In July and September, seventy 
new college students were admitted to 
the four year college program. 
Honors In West Virginia 
Miss Nancy Ann Gocke of Clarks- 
burg, West Virginia, daughter of Dr. 
and Mrs. Thomas Gocke and a senior 
student in the school of nursing college 
program, was crowned as Queen Sylvia 
XVII by the Honorable William C. 
Marland, Governor of West Virginia. 
The crowning of the selected queen, a 
native of West Virginia, takes place 
each year at the Elkins Forest Festi- 
val, Elkins, West Virginia. Queen Syl- 
via (Nancy Gocke) was attended by a 
court of fifty princesses selected young 
girls from the state of West Virginia. 
Dean Florence M. Gipe and Miss 
Margaret Paulonis represented the 
School of Nursing 
faculty at the coro- 
nation. They de- 
scribed it as the 
"most colorful and 
spectacular sight 
they had ever wit- 
nessed. Dr. Gipe 
was greatly im- 
pressed by the hos- 
pitality shown by 
the citizens of the 
state of West Vir- 
ginia. The Univer- 
sity of Maryland re- 
ceived much recognition through the 
fact that "Queen Sylvia XVII is a stu- 
dent of the School of Nursing." 
T.B. Nursinj> 
On December 23, 1953, Dr. H. C. 
Byrd, President of the University, and 
Dr. Robert C. Riley signed a contract 
agreement whereby the State Health 
Department provides facilities for the 
teaching of Tuberculosis Nursing to 
our four year college students. On this 
same day, the President agreed to pro- 
vide the necessary facilities in the 
school of nursing whereby diploma 
graduates from the regular three year 
schools could matriculate in the school 
of nursing for a Bachelor of Science 
degree in Nursing. Heretofore, it was 
necessary for graduate nurses to ma- 
triculate in other schools such as the 



12 




Dean Qipe 



College of Arts and Science and Edu- 
cation for college degrees. Since the 
bachelor's degree in nursing is a pre- 
specialization degree, it would seem 
that the judgment of President Byrd 
and Dean Harold Cotterman, who must 
approve all course work, was extremely 
sound in making this transfer. More 
than 300 graduate registered nurses 
are presently working towards a bac- 
calaureate degree in the various schools 
of the University. The National League 
for Nursing, New York City, have 
hailed this movement as a great for- 
ward step for the State of Maryland, 
inasmuch as all nurses graduating from 
this program will be prepared for be- 
ginning positions in Public Health 
nursing. The degree will serve also 
as a basic foundation for the prepara- 
tion of head nurse supervisors, teach- 
ers, and administratiors. 
Personal News 
Miss Margaret C. Sherman is liv- 
ing at 2734 N. Second Street, Harris- 
burg, Pa., and writes, "I would like 
for anyone passing through here to 
stop and see me." 




"QUEEN SYLVIA II" 

Ilia i.rr, u, ncii. wiiiium G. norland, Gov- 
vrnor o) Hex/ Virginia, crowns Miss Nancy 
Inn Oocke as Queen Sylvia \\ II. Miss Qocke 
is (i senior Ktitaent in the Baccalaureate Pro- 
gram in Nursing. 



Mr. and Mrs. John Millar, and chil- 
dren have moved also to Harrisburg, 
Pa., Mrs. Millar was Ellen Dorman 
Baggett, Class 1947. 

Miss Shirley M. Schafer, Class 1951, 
has a position as general duty nurse 
at Ohio State Hospital, in Columbus, 
Ohio. Miss Schafer, resigned as office 
nurse for Dr. Shanahan, in Essex, Md., 
in August 1953. 

Miss Myra Phelps Hobbs, Class 1900, 
is in Shaffer's Convalescent Retreat, 
in Ellicott City, Md. Miss Hobbs would 



like very much for some of the nurses 
to call on her in the home. 

Mr. and Mrs. William C. Wroe, have 
moved into a new home at 1603 Free- 
domway, N. Baltimore, 13, Md. Mrs. 
Wroe was Edith Ellen Viereck, Class 
1950. 

Miss Mary Lenore Muir, Class 1953, 
has an industrial nursing position with 
the Rustless Division — Armco Steel 
Corporation of Baltimore, Md. 
In Malaya 

Captain Fred McCrumb, and his wife, 
Mrs. Gloria Mullen McCrumb, and their 
two children, are stationed in Malaya. 
Captain McCrumb left the States in 
June 1953, and Mrs. McCrumb left the 
first of August with the two children, 
a daughter, two years old, and a son, 
four months old. Mrs. McCrumb was 
Gloria Mullen, Class 1950. 

Miss Margaret Evelyn Holar, Class 
1947, is living in Baltimore, and doing 
private duty nursing at Johns Hopkins 
Hospital. 

Mrs. Russell Perkins, is residing in 
Baltimore for a short time. She was 
Mary Juilette Miles, Class 1912. 

Dr. and Mrs. John Rosser, and two 
children, Debra, age three and David, 
age one year, are living in Bethesda, 
Md. Mrs. Rosser was Pearl Larmore, 
Class 1949. 

Miss Margaret Elizabeth Ritter, 
Class 1950, has a position in the VA 
Hospital, in Boston, Mass. 

Mr. and Mrs. Berkley A. Brunsdon, 
and two daughters, Susan, 22 months, 
and Carol Ellen, age eight months, 
have moved into a new home at 7601 
Northcote Ave., Hammond, Indiana. 
Mrs. Brunsdon was Elizabeth Nunne- 
lee, Class 1935. 

Mrs. Charles G. Morgan (Anne C. 
Lutz, '46) with her young son, John 
Frederick, is visiting her father, Dr. 
John F. Lutz, while waiting to join 
Sergeant Morgan in Japan. Bennie 
and Charles Morgan are with them. 

Miss Volina Rutherford, Class 1913, 
flew here from Los Angeles, California, 
in June to attend her Class Reunion, 
and is the guest of Miss Golda Price. 
Class 1913. She has been extensively 
entertained here and in Virginia, Mass- 
chusetts, New York and Washington, 
D. C, on her trip east. 

A very interesting bit of news comes 
from Clifton, New Jersey. The Ladies 
Auxiliary of the Passaic County Medi 
cal Society, have a nurse Scholarship 
Committee, which gives five full Nurses 
Scholarships each year to nursing 
schools in the country. One of our 
graduates, Mrs. Howard W. Stier, is 
chairman of the committee. Dr. Stier 
is practicing in Clifton, New Jersey. 
Mrs. Stier was Miriam Hutchins, Class 
1943. 

In England 

Mrs. A. B. McClintock, nee Phyllis 
Booth, Class 1952, joined her husband, 
Lt. A. B. McClintock, who is stationed 
in England. They both like England 
very much. 

Miss Britta H. Fris, Class 1952, is 
with the Navy Nurse Corps, and is sta- 
tioned in the U. S. Naval Hospital, 
Camp Pendleton, Oceanside, California. 



in ' 



m l 

JIB. 1 



... 



ovt 






and Edv 

ft are 
■die * 

in June 

Annapoi 

garet fl 
Mr. a 

H S 



"Maryland" "Hiry 



Kiss 

Mr.; 
Pattie. 

Lt, a 



Mrs. 

kFon 

krwi 

Mrs. 

in Bait 

Ddha 

Atari! 
. 






Wi 



Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Ruhland are liv- 
ing in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Mrs. 
Ruhland was Margaret Harrington, 
Class 1923. 

Mrs. Edward J. Bradel, .Jr., writes, 
"We returned the lXth of December 
from a sixteen month tour of duty in 
Mannheim, Germany. We had a long 
stay overseas, and its truly wonder- 
ful to be in the good U.S.A. once again. 
Our daughter, Alice Jean, age five, 
and Edward Joseph the III, age nine 
years, enjoyed our trip most of all. 
We are returning to a new home a 
mile out of Lancaster, Pa., and am 
looking forward to seeing all of you 
in June 1954." Mrs. Bradel was Edna 
Sutton, Class 1937. 

Miss Susan E. Wood, and Miss Verna 
Zang, Class 1953, have positions at 
the Anne Arundel County Hospital in 
Annapois, Maryland. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leo Kridle, and their 
two children are living in Connells- 
ville, Pa. Mrs. Kridle was Ada Mar- 
garet Watson, Class 1940. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Miller, have 
four little red heads, Bobby, age five 
and a half, Anne, four years, Margie, 
two years, and Stevie age six months. 
Mrs. Miller was Marjorie Brigham, 
.Class 1944. 

In Roanoke, Va. 

Miss Thelma I. Prigel, Class 1953, 
has a position at the Lewis Gale Hos- 
pital, in Roanoke, Virginia. 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Kormanski, 
and their two daughters, Tina and 
Pattie, live in Pear River, New York, 
Mrs. Kormanski was Marianna Gillelan, 
Class 1944. 

Lt. and Mrs. James L. Cox, and 
their two daughters, are living in Palm 
City, California. Lt. Cox finished his 
third complete term of duty in Korea 
on December 20, 1953. Mrs. Cox was 
Esther Blanche Garrett, Class 1942. 

Mrs. Howard N. Detrick is living at 
516 S. College Street, Newberg, Ore- 
gon. She spent quite some time with 
her husband, Major Howard N. Detrick, 
in Formosa. Mrs. Detrick was Nancy 
Layman, Class 1945. 

Mrs. Bertie Hughes Davidson, Class 
1914, resigned from the Veterans Ad- 
ministration Hospital, at Fort Howard, 
in Baltimore, Md., in November 1952. 
She is now residing at 415 Ridgewood 
Road, Key Biscayne, Miami, Florida, 
and having a wonderful time since her 
retirement from nursing. 

Alumnae Association Nominees For '54 

Martha Curtiss, '48 President 

Milbrey Neikerk, '29 First Vice-President 

Eugenia Crow, '47 Second Vice-President 

Carol Hosfeld, '50 Recording Secretary 

Blanche M. Horine, '21 Treasurer 

Executive Board 

Flora M. Street, '38 Shirley L. Milke, '45 

Mary B. Bisset, '46 Maria Sagardia, '43 
Directory Committee 
Eva Popp, '46, Chairman 

Gertrude Etzler, '15 Mary Joneckis, '49 

Thelma Ey, '47 Wilhelmina 

Edna Garies, '40 McCann, '23 

Ellen Lloyd, '17 Esther Uber, '34 

Nominating Committee 

Thelma Kleckner, '47, Chairman 
Ethel M. Troy, '17 Helen Maxwell, '52 

Annette M. 
Wills,' 48 

"Maryland" 




FROM THE CLASS OF 1903 

is ire approach another series <>l 5-yeat reunions scheduled for Commencement » ■ • /. oj 
1954, it seems fitting in recall tin most successful reunion oj tin class n) 1903. 

Five ni the xi in/ liiimi members returned for Hun BOt/i Reunion, pictured ahoiu from 
left tn right: <:. u. Claims, •/. i/. Matthews, Edward Brown, Rev. Preston I.. Peach and i /' 

Willis. 

Thirty-five entered the freshman thins <n old MAO In L899. Twelve graduated. / 
passed and seven answered roll call. Five returned in the campus for the "Golden Reunion*" 
[list ni were Emmons Dunlar and Enoch Oarner. Walts has long been at u<< i niversity fn 
Horticulture: Cairns is a retired Admiral j Rev. Peach devoted his life in the Missionary field, 
Matthews practiced low, while Itroxn is recognized in the tobacco field. 



Bulletin Committee 

Elizabeth H. Singleton, '47— Chairman (1956) 

Mabel Simmont, '47 — Co-chairman (1955) 

Phyllis M. Johnson, '49 (1956) 

Mary A. Brislin. '51 (1956) 

Dorothy B. Cortleur, '49 (1956) 

Joyce Johnson, '52 (1955) 

Thelma Kleckner, '47 (1955) 

Freda Michelitch, '47 (1954) 

Kathryn P. Donnelly, '48 (1954) 

Jennie B. Tegler, '48 (1954) 

Education Committee 

Virginia Conley, '40, Chairman 
Bessie M. Wilda Snyder, '34 

Arnurius, '20 Doris Stevens, *51 

Katherine 

Williams, '45 

Representatives Alumni Council 

Flora M. Streett, '38 Virginia Stack, '33 

Lola M. Mihm, '39 

Publication Committee 

Barbara Ardis, '45, Chairman 
Elizabeth R. Helen W. King, '44 

Singleton, '47 Mabel Simmont, '47 

Frances 

Janmarone, '36 



him a Doctor of Juridicial Science in 
1952. 

Dean Fey has recently been ad- 
mitted to the District of Columbia Bar. 
He served four years in the Marine 
Corps during World War II. He was a 
Captain when he left active duty. He 
is a Mason, a member of the Elks and 
Shrine AAONMS. 



College of 



School of 



Law 



G. Kenneth Reiblich '29 



John T. Fey, Dean At G.W. 

George Washington University has 
named a Dean of their Law 
School. He is John T. Fey who has been 
Associate Professor of Law at the 
School since 1949. Dean Fey graduated 
from the University of Maryland 
School of Law in 1940 and practiced 
in Cumberland, Md., for five years. He 
was a member of the Maryland Legis- 
lature from 1946 to 1950 and was also 
on the Alleghany County Board of 
Commissioners. 

Dean Fey was also an officer of the 
Maryland Alumni Club of Alleghany 
County. He holds degrees from Wash- 
ington & Lee, has studied at Harvard 
and for his work in the field of taxa- 
tion Yale University conferred upon 



Education 

_^ mmmm ^ mm ^ mm ^ mm=m ^ m ^ June Jacobs Brown 
John R. Weld 

John R. Weld '36, formerly admin- 
istrator of specialized employment 
for RCA-Victor has been appointed 
manager of employment for the per- 
sonnel department of RCA-Victor Di- 
vision of the Radio Corporation of 
America. He will be responsible for 
coordinating employment activities at 
all locations of the RCA-Victor Di- 
vision. Mr. Weld was formerly with 
Glenn L. Martin and later served as 
personnel manager of the Lord Balti- 
more Press in Baltimore. He is a mem- 
ber of the Placement Advisory Com- 
mittee of the University of Marvland. 



WMUC 

The student-operated campus radio 
station WMUC is attempting to recon- 
struct its somewhat hazy history from 
its inception in 1942 to the present. 
Alumni who have data of interest or 
who recall pertinent information con- 
cerning WMUC, WUOM, the Old Line 
Network or whatever other title it may 
have had, are requested to send a note 
to the Publicity-Public Relations Direc- 
tor, WMUC, College Park. 



13 



Washington Honors Maryland 

Notre Dame Presents O'Donnell Trophy As Board of 
Trade and Touchdown Club Laud Terps 



Washington, D. C, honored Mary- 
land's 1953 No. 1, national cham- 
pionship football team at a jampacked 
Statler Hotel luncheon jointly spon- 
sored by the Board of Trade and the 
Touchdown Club. 

A typical Maryland team, a typical 
Tatum-coached team ... a typical Na- 
tional Championship team," said Bill 
Earley, assistant coach at Notre Dame, 
as he turned over the Rev. Hugh 
O'Donnell plaque, symbolic of the Na- 
tional championship, to Maryland. 

Thus, Maryland joined Notre Dame, 
Michigan, Oklahoma, Michigan State 
and Tennessee as one-time holders of 
the famed trophy. 

It was the high water mark in Mary- 
land athletic history. 

Notre Dame Congratulates 

"From the No. 2 team to the No. 1, 
our heartiest congratulations," said 
Coach Earley as he lauded the Terps 
"as the kind of ball club that warms 
the heart of a football coach." 

Quarterback Bernie Faloney and 
tackle Stan Jones were front and cen- 
tered to receive International News 
Service All-America certificates from 
sports editor John Barrington. 

A pre-luncheon football victory pa- 
rade led by Maryland's 100-piece band 
and a bevy of majorettes, preceded the 
Terp squad as the parade was escorted 
personally by Chief of Police Robert 
V. Murray. The street was lined with 
hundreds of people and 1,500 attended 
the luncheon. 

Dr. Byrd, athletic-minded, outgoing 
Maryland president, took advantage of 
his speaking time to point out that 
"Tatum turned in the best coaching 
job before and after November 1 of 
any coach in the nation." 

Tatum, following Dr. Byrd to the 
rostrum, thanked everyone for turn- 
ing out to honor "the finest bunch of 
football players I've ever been as- 
sociated with, true champions in every 
sense of the word." 

Greetings From Leaders 

The Maryland players were intro- 
duced by Jim Gibbons of WMAL-TV. 

Brief remarks were made by Mary- 
land Senators J. Glenn Beall and John 
Butler, and District Commissioner 
Renah Camalier. 

Joint masters-of-ceremonies were 
Harry L. Merrick, President of the 
Board of Trade and Joe Lynch, Presi- 
dent of the Touchdown Club. 

Mr. Merrick left little doubt as to 
how Washington stood on its "adop- 
tion" of the Terps. 

"We always look on Maryland as 
one of our fine schools and consider 
it just as much a part of this com- 
munity as Georgetown, George Wash- 
ington and Catholic University," he 
said in the best Chamber of Commerce 
tradition. 



14 



He made out a good case for the 
Terrapins as a metropolitan area team, 
and said it behooves the Board of 
Trade to encourage community spirit 
in intercollegiate athletics. 

"Any attraction which brings visi- 
tors to Washington is good for our 
economy. So we have a frankly sel- 
fish reason for doing what we can to 
encourage attendance in collegiate con- 
tests." 

Dr. Byrd agreed there was an af- 
finity because Congress had taken away 
a part of Maryland to create the Dis- 
trict of Columbia. 

"And since we were never paid for 
it, we feel we still are a part of it and 
it is a part of us," Dr. Byrd said. 
Those Keystone Players 

The football-minded president also 
jocularly answered those who criticize 
the school's enrollment of Pennsyl- 
vania football players with the expla- 
nation that "all north of Harrisburg 
was stolen from us, and in their foot- 
ball players we are only getting what 
belongs to us." 

Joe Lynch, Touchdown Club presi- 
dent, called the Terrapins "the great- 
est football aggregation ever assem- 
bled on any college campus in Amer- 
ica." 

Senior Bowl 

Ralph Felton, Bob Morgan and Dick 
Nolan were among choices for the All- 



North team to play the South in the 
Senior Bowl Game at Mobile, Ala. FelJ 
ton and Morgan were "assigned" tol 
the North to give the game better balJ 
ance. 

With Ralph Felton starring, the! 
North defeated the South, 20-14. The] 
hard-running Terp fullback scored the 
North's first touchdown and kicked two< 
extra points. 

Senior bowl performers get paid for 
their efforts and thereby turn pro- 
fessional. Members of the winning 
squad are guaranteed $500 each and 
the losers $400 each. Free substitu- 
tions are permitted and squads are 
selected with a view toward use of 
the two-platoon system. 

1954 Co-Captains 

John Irvine and Dick Bielski will | 
co-captain the 1954 Maryland football j 
team. 

They were elected by their team- 
mates. 

AP All-Sports Poll 

The University of Maryland, unbeat- 
en in 10 regular season football games 
and named 1953's No. 1 college team 
in the AP poll edged the Cleveland 
Browns for second place in the 23rd 
annual Associated Press year-end All- 
Sports Poll, '53. The New York 
Yankees, who won an unprecedented 
fifth straight American League pen- 
nant and followed up with their fifth 
consecutive World Series champion- 
ship, were voted first place. 



(Concluded on Page 62) 



I 







NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP AWARD 

Governor Theodore R. McKeldin connratulatcs Maryland coach Jim Tatum on receiving the 
O'Donnell trophy, emblematic of the national football championship, as Judge William P. 
Cole, Jr., chairman of the Board of Regents and Dr. H. O. Byrd look on. 



"Maryland" 






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16 



CoJ/ege of 



Arts and Sciences 



Lois Eld Ei-nest 




Prof. Ulrich 



Homer Ulrich has been appointed 
Professor and Head of the De- 
partment of Music. Mr. Ulrich is 
a native of Chicago. He received his 
original music edu- 
cation at the Chica- 
go Musical College 
which he later sup- 
plemented by a de- 
gree of Master of 
Arts from the Uni- 
versity of Chicago. 

Mr. Ulrich comes 
to Maryland from 
the University of 
Texas, where he had 
been professor of 
the Department of 
Music. His previous experience in- 
cludes several years at Monticello Col- 
lege, Godfrey, Illinois and more than 
six years in the Chicago Symphony Or- 
chestra as Bassoonist and Cellist. 

Mr. Ulrich is the author of four 
books in the field of music and a num- 
ber of periodical articles. His books 
are "Chamber Music" (Columbia Uni- 
versity Press), "The Education of a 
Concert-Goer" (Dodd Mead and Co.), 
"Symphonic Music" (Columbia Univer- 
sity Press) and "Famous Women Sing- 
ers" (Dodd Mead and Co.). 

Dupont Promotion 

Alfred J. Northam, assistant direc- 
tor of the Dupont Company's rubber 
laboratory in Deepwater Point, N. J., 
has been named assistant sales man- 
ager for rubber chemicals. Mr. North- 
am will make his headquarters in 
Wilmington, Del. 

Mr. Northam has spent three de- 
cades in the rubber industry, 26 years 
of which have been 
with Dupont. A na- 

ative of Accomac, 
Va., he received his 
bachelor of science 
degree in chemistry 
from the University 
^^ o f Maryland i n 

^ 1922. The same 
J^L year, lie took post 
N^^tafll I graduate studies at 
^J9^\ Rhode Island State 

■llA «■ I College while work- 
er. Northam ing as a chemist in 
the college's experi- 
mental station at Kingston, R. I. 

Early in 1923, he joined the United 
States Rubber Company in Bristol, 
R. I., as a chemist. The following year 
he went to work for the Pennsylvania 
Rubber Company in Jeannette, Pa., 
and three years later became a chem- 
ist for the Graselli Company in Cleve- 
land, now a part of the Dupont or- 
ganization. He was transferred to the 
rubber laboratory at Deepwater Point 
in 1929, and was named assistant direc- 
tor on September 15, 1943. 



16 




JONES DECORATED 

After receiving the Commendation Ribbon 
lor meritorious service in Korea, Sgt. Alcin 
i.. Jones (right) (A&S '49) is congratulated 
tin i.t. Cot. Howard Peglam, commanding offi- 
cer of tin 593d Transportation Traffic Regu- 
lating Detachment . Sergeant Jones was cited 
for his work ax highway non-commissioned 
officer in the operations section of Eighth 
i nun Transportation. Sergeant Jones entered 
l In Arm ii in 1'cbruary 1952, completed basic 
training at Fori Eustis, Va., and has been in 
Korea since Jast March. The graduate of the 
University of Maryland teas traffic manager 
for Charles G. Summers, Jr., Inc., as a ci- 
vilian. 



Mr. Northam's broad experience cov- 
ers virtually every phase of the rub- 
ber industry from compounding, re- 
search, and development work through 
demonstration, sales service, and di- 
rect sales. His specialties include wire 
and cable jacketing, and quality con- 
trol of rubber chemicals. He also has 
headed up all color development work 
on neoprene, and is well known for 
his many contributions to the tech- 
nical literature on rubber. 

Mr. Northam is a member of Theta 
Chi fraternity and the American Chem- 
ical Society's Division of Rubber Chem- 
istry, affiliated with the New York and 
Philadelphia Rubber Groups. 

Marion P. Sutton '37 

Marion P. Sutton, '37, Manager of 
the Almira Branch National Bank of 
Commerce of Seattle, was among the 
graduates of the Pacific Coast Banking 
School held at the University of Wash- 
ington, Seattle, Washington. Mr. Sut- 
ton has been in banking ever since 
graduation and has been with the Na- 
tional Bank of Commerce for eleven 
years. He has been a member of the 
Washington Bankers Association Agri- 
culture Committee for four years and 
active in County and State banking 
activities for many years. He is mar- 
ried and has four children all in school. 

Newell S. Bowman '51 

Newell S. Bowman '51, of Mercer 
Road, Princeton, N. J., has been se- 
lected as the recipient of the Allied 
Chemical & Dye Corp. Fellowship for 
the 1953-54 academic year at Princeton 
University. He is completing the last 
year of work leading to a Ph.D. de- 
gree in Organic Chemistry. 




Mr. Carrington 



Bowman attended Hyattsville High 
School in Hyattsville, Md. He received 
a B.S. degree from the U. S. Naval 
Academy in 1946 and served in the 
Navy until 1949. After his discharge, 
Bowman entered the University of 
Maryland and was granted a degree in 
chemistry in 1951. 

Omar R. Carrington '28 

Omar R. Carrington '28, is now an 
agent for Travelers Life Insurance 
Company. He is 
^^^^ well remembered as 

Jttjttfl Rk former head of 

the Department of 
Publications at the 
University and the 
Director of all stu- 
d e n t publications. 
Three All-American 
yearbooks were pro- 
duced under his di- 
rection and his serv- 
ice to the Univer- 
sity ran from 1928 
to 1944. He later 
was editor of the magazine "Agricul 
ture in the Americas" published by the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture. From 
1947 to 1950 he taught art simultan- 
eously at the Cochran School of Art, 
Catholic University and the National 
School of Art in Washington, D. C. 
Since that time he served as project 
director in the Graphics Division of 
the U. S. Department of State. 

Dr. Otto Reinmuth 

Dr. Otto Reinmuth, a chemist with 
more than thirty years experience, has 
been named supervisor of the chemi 
cal literature section at Armour Re- 
search Foundation of Illinois Institute 
of Technology, Chicago. He holds de- 
grees from Maryland, obtained in 1922 
1925 and a Ph.D. in 1930. Dr. Rein 
muth was with the University of 
Chicago from 1935 until he joined the 
Foundation. From 1935 to 1939, he 
was also managing editor of The Jour 
nal of Organic Chemistry, published in 
Chicago. 

From 1925 to 1940, he was associ- 
ated with the Journal of Chemical EduJ 
cation, Chicago, an associate editor and] 
then editor. He was an inspector and 
analyst with the State of Maryland 
Regulatory Service in College Park 
Md., from 1922 to 1925. 



Norman E. Hathaway 

Alumnus Norman E. Hathaway, 
sales manager of the industrial chemi- 
cals department of Davison Chemical 
Corporation, was given a six-months' 
leave of absence to serve as directo: 
of the Chemicals and Rubber Divisio 
of the Chemical, Rubber and Fores 
Products Bureau in the successor agen 
cy to the National Production Author 
ity which is being organized by the 
Department of Commerce in Wash 
ington. 




"Maryla 



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I 



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The University Library recently re- 
ceived funds for the establishment of 
the Edmund E. Miller Drama Collec- 
tion. Shortly after Dr. Miller's death, 
friends contributed $375.00 as a memo- 
rial fund for the purchasing of drama 
material for the library. About the 
same time, the library also purchased 
the fine German Drama collection of 
over 1000 items which Dr. Miller had 
collected. Most of the material in the 
collection is now out-of-print. Dr. Miller 
was on the staff of the Foreign Langu- 
age Department and had spent many 
years in Europe. 

"Maryland" 



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208 N. Calvert Street 
BALTIMORE 2, MD. 



School of 



Pharmacy 



B. Olive Cole 



Old Timer 

Major Robert Klotzman, Pharmacy 
'33, who came up from the rank 
of Private, is currently stationed at 
Great Falls AFB, Montana, as Hos- 
pital Administrator. Major Klotzman 
holds membership in the American 
Pharmaceutical As- 
sociation, Maryland 
Pharmaceutical As- 
sociation, Society of 
Hospital Pharma- 
cists, Association 
for the advancement 
of Science (Fellow), 
Association of Mili- 
tary Surgeons, Dar- 
ien Lodge AF&AM, 
Delta Lodge No. 128 
AF&AM (Hon.), 
Major Klotzman Scottish Rite Free- 
masons, Abou Saad 
Temple — Shrine, Orchid Chapter No. 1 
—Order of the Eastern Star, National 
Sojourners — Past Pres. Great Falls 
Chap. No. 313, Veterans of Foreign 
Wars— Post No. 100, National Geo- 
graphic Society, Reserve Officers As- 
sociation of the US, Military Order of 
the World Wars, and Alumni Associa- 
tion— U. of Md. School of Pharmacy. 





"This is a one-man job. You three guys 
will do." w ' 



Dr. John Wagner 



it 



Jean Rooney, in the Atlanta Con- 
stitution, writes, "The sterner sex 
not only is turning to the weaker sex 
to cure troubles of the heart, men are 
seeking women doctors to cure all kinds 
of physical ills. 

"This is the opinion of a visiting 
woman physician, of 25 years' prac- 
tice. 

"Dr. Eva Dodge, head of the Women 
Physicians' group of the Southern 
Medical Association, thinks feminine 
practitioners are gaining male accept- 
ance daily. 

Into General Practice 

"Though most of them still specialize 
in child and mother care, women doc- 
tors are beginning to go into general 
practice and the family physician field, 
according to the white-haired doctor 
who teachers obstetrics at the Medical 
practices in Little Rock as well. 

"A woman practitioner still has more 
proving of herself to do than a man," 
the soft-voiced Dr. Dodge said. 

But once a patient has tried a skirted 
medic, he or she is a patient for life, 
she added. 

Blue-eyed Dr. Dodge, who has de- 
livered so many babies she's lost count, 
has seen the maternal mortality rate 
drop tremendously since her school 
days as one of the first women medi- 
cal students at the University of 
Maryland in the 1920's. 

She credits public health prenatal 
clinics that give thorough care to ex- 
pectant mothers, and antibiotics for 
the drop in mortality rate. 

National Essay Winner 
Irvin P. Pollack, sophomore medical 
student at the University of Mary- 
land, was awarded first prize in a na- 
tional essay contest conducted by the 
Schering Corporation of Bloomfield, 
New Jersey. 

Three grand awards of a certificate 
and $500 in cash were offered by the 
Corporation to undergraduate medi- 
cal students for the best essays on each 
of three subjects furnished contestants 
by the Award Committee. In 1953 the 
general subjects were (1) Antihista- 
minic Treatment, (2) Hormone Ther- 
apy and (3) the Treatment of Peptic 
Ulcer. 

Mr. Pollack selected for his sub- 
ject "New Concepts in the Treatment 
of Peptic Ulcer." Success in the con- 
test is based upon the ability of the 
student to explore current and recent 
research and to integrate his findings 
with rational practices in clinical medi- 
cine. Mr. Pollack won also the Dean's 
award of a certificate and $100 in cash 
for the best essay on the Treatment of 
Peptic Ulcer written by a student at 
the University of Maryland. 

Mr. Pollack attended Baltimore City 
College and the Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 

"Maryland" 



'Who's Who?" 



A total of 30 Maryland students — 
26 seniors and 4 juniors were se- 
lected for Who's Who Among Students 
in American Universities and Colleges, 
which annual honors outstanding stu- 
dents in American colleges. 

A student committee headed by 
Gloria Wallerstein Derkay and a fac- 
ulty committee headed by Dean of 
Men Geary Eppley selected the stu- 
dents. They are: 

James B. Arnold, Ruth E. Bauman, 
Ann M. Bennett, James D. Blackwell, 
David L. Bowers, Charles A. Brailer, 
Richard E. Cox, Martin R. Crytzer, 
Jeanie R. Eberts, Robert F. Fischer, 
Donald M. Goldstein, Chester E. Hanu- 
lak, Stanley P. Jones, Victor H. Jungk, 
Jr., Elin Lake, Morris M. Lebowitz, 
Gerald W. Longanecker, John F. Mar- 
tin, Jr., Eugene G. Michel, Mary Mar- 
garet Mueller, William K. Price, Bettie 
E. Rossman, William A. Stokes, Jr., 
Mary E. Turner, Mary J. Turner, Bruce 
W. H. Ulrich, Richard W. Waters, 
Eleanor R. Weinstein, Frances A. 
White, and Betty H. Woodward. 

A total of ten students served on 
the committee with Mrs. Derkay. 

"We felt that in this way we could 
best select the 30 outstanding stu- 
dents," Mrs. Derkay added. 

After the committee had made its 
selections a sub-committee met with a 
group representing the faculty com- 
mittee to go over the lists submitted 
by both groups. They were practically 
identical. 



Sez Testudinette: 

Scotch friend of 
ours saw com- 
pany coming around 
dinner time and or- 
dered all of his kids 
onto the porch, 
armed with tooth- 
picks . . . Friend of 
ours is getting tired 
of her husband and 
wraps his lunch in a 
road map . . . A 
swell wedding is one 
in which they throw 
puffed rice . . . Girl 
we know sued for 
divorce because her hubby was care- 
less about his appearance; hadn't 
shoived up in 13 years . . . Man we 
know has an imaginary stenographer 
. . . when his letters are poorly typed 
he puts her initials at the bottom . . . 
A woman is always ready to take what's 
becoming to her . . . A husband who 
talks in his sleep may easily ruin his 
wife's nerves if she can't understand 
what he's saying ... A "raving beau- 
ty" is one who came in last in a "Miss" 
contest . . . Feller tells me he had 
his nose broken in three places. He 
should have stayed out of those places 
. . . We asked this felloiv in Hutzler's 
if they had notions in his department 
. . . He said, "Yes, but we try to sup- 
press 'em during store hours." 




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Office & Plant: 91 — O Street, Southeast 
Lincoln 7-2434 Washington 3, D. C. 



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Anchor Fence 

Anchor Post Products, Inc. 

1317 HALF STREET, S.E. 

Lincoln 3-6660 

WASHINGTON, D. C, 



''Maryland" 




Do YOU Insist on YOUR milk 
in GLASS Bottles^-or do you 
accept it in substitute con- 
tainers? 

GLASS is a vitreous material re- 
quiring no coating for protection 
of its contents. The GLASS bottle 
is sterilized at the dairy and it can 
impart no foreign taste or odor — 
or flakes of coating — to the milk. 
It is a rigid and stable container, 
will not crush easily in handling 
and not subject to leaking in your 
refrigerator. And you can SEE 
both quality and quantity you re- 
ceive. 

In many markets a premium is 
charged for the less durable, single 
service container and, of course, it 
has no return value to customer, 
storekeeper or dairy. Added ex- 
pense, which ultimately must be 
absorbed by the consumer, is the 
result. 

MILK IS BETTER IN GLASS 
BOTTLES 

There is no substitute as good. 

THE BUCK GLASS CO. 

Fort Ave. & Lawrence St. 
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USE THE COUPON ON LAST PAGE 



20 



College of 



College of 



i== ^^^ = ^ = ; Dr. Howard L. Stier 
Thomas E. Miller, Jr., '39 

Thomas E. Miller, Jr., '39, has been 
appointed Sales Manager of a new 
Middle Atlantic Division for Bird & 
Son. The territory comprises Southern 
New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, 
.Maryland and parts of Virginia and 
West Virginia. He has been with the 
company since 1940, serving in Ver- 
mont, Maine and Connecticut. 

Kinghorne Retires 

J. W. Kinghorne (Agr. 1911) widely 
known poultry authority, has been 
named Washington representative of 
the National Broiler Association which 
maintains headquarters in Chicago. 
Mr. Kinghorne, who retired June 30, 
1950 after 27 vears of service in the 
USDA, lives at 1365 Iris Street, N.W. 

Effective immediately, he will repre- 
sent the association in Washington 
with respect to special assignments 
and will meet with poultry officials of 
the USDA and other governmental 
agencies, attend congressional hear- 
ings pertaining to poultry and con- 
tribute informational material to the 
"Broiler World," the association's of- 
ficial publication. 

Mr. Kinghorne was born in Cumber- 
land, Maryland, and received his B.S. 
degree from the University of Mary- 
land in 1911. He joined the USDA 
staff in 1912 in poultry research and 
extension work and resigned in 1920 
to help organize the National Poultry 
Institute in Washington, of which he 
was Secretary-Treasurer and Manag- 
ing Director. 

He returned to the USDA in 1933 to 
join the Agricultural Adjustment Ad- 
ministration's staff and continued in 
government service in the department 
until he retired. He was Assistant Di- 
rector of the Poultry Branch of the 
Production and Marketing Administra- 
tion at the time of his retirement and 
was secretary of the USDA' poultry 
committee. Mr. Kinghorne is author 
and co-author of many articles on poul- 
try and egg production and marketing 
including poultry textbooks. He is a 
member of the World Poultry Science 
Association and vice-president of that 
association for the U. S. 

Dr. Jull Featured 

"The Processing Equipment News," 
for December 1953, published by the 
Barker Poultry Equipment Company 
of Ottumwa, Iowa, features the pioneer 
accomplishments in poultry research 
and husbandry by Dr. Morley Allan 
Jull, head of Maryland's poultry de- 
partment and to his work in the de- 
velopment and expansion of that de- 
partment. The eight lead pages of the 
magazine, as well as the cover design, 
text and illustrations, are devoted to 
Dr, Jull and his work. 



Agriculture Business & Public 

Administration 



Egbert F. Tinley 



"Wings of Gold" 

//\V/ ings of Gold" of a Naval Avia- 
Vt tor and his commission were 

awarded to Navy Ens. George L. Boaz, 

('52 B&PA). He will report to Corpus 
Christi, Texas for 
further training. 
Ens. Boaz entered 
the Naval Aviation 
Cadet Program 
through the Naval 
Air Station at Ana- 
costia, D. C. 

The presentation 
was made by Rear 
Admiral Dale Har- 
ris, USN, Chief of 
Naval Air Basic 
Training, during 
ceremonies held at 

the U. S. Naval Air Station in Pensa- 

cola, Fla. 




Ensign Boaz 



College of 



Physical Education 
Recreation & Health 



Dr. James H. Humphrey 

Dr. James H. Humphrey has been 
added to the staff in order to de- 
velop a new curriculum in Elementary 
Physical Education and to take the 
place of Dr. David A. Field, who is 
now at Arnold College, University of 
Bridgeport, in Connecticut. 

Dr. Humphrey, Associate Professor 
of Health and Physical Education, 
comes to Maryland 
after two years on 
the Physical Educa- 
tion staff at Michi- 
gan State. He took 
his doctor's degree 
at Boston Univer- 
sity and prior to 
that was a city sup- 
ervisor of Physical 
Education in Ohio 
for many years. 
During the war, Dr. 
Humphrey was head 
track coach at the 
Great Lakes Naval Training Station. 
This year, for the first time, the 
University of Maryland is undertak- 
ing the preparation of elementary 
school teachers in an effort to meet 
the growing state-wide need. Dr. 
Humphrey is working closely with the 
College of Education in order to pro- 
vide elementary teachers with the 
necessary background for directing 
play activities as general teachers or 
as specialists in physical education. 




Dr. Humphrey 









"Maryland" 



New Curriculum 

A teacher-training curriculum in ele- 
mentary school physical education and 
health has been established in accord- 
ance with the University's new four- 
year program of training for elemen- 
tary school teachers. Students major- 
ing in elementary education may take 
a .series of prescribed courses in this 
College and thereby become certified 
as an elementary school specialist in 
physical education and health. Plans 
are being made to offer courses in this 
field on an off-campus basis so that 
teachers in service may pursue gradu- 
ate work in this area. 

Although the idea of elementary 
school physical education is not new, 
it has gained wide-spread attention in 
recent years. 



Glenn L. Martin 
College of 



Engineering & 
Aeronautical Sciences 



Col. O. H. Saunders '10 
- A. Lawrence Guess '51 



Alex Cockey Retires 

After 42 years of service, Alex D. 
Cockey, one of the leading con- 
tract underwriters in the United States, 
has retired as manager of the contract 
bond department of the Mayland 
Casualty Company, Baltimore. He 
graduated from Maryland (B.S.C.E ) in 
1907. 

Mr. Cockey entered the contract de- 
partment of the company in 1911, be- 
coming assistant superintendent in 
1914 and manager in 1931. 

Under his management Maryland 
Casualty wrote some of the largest 
contract bonds produced by any surety 
company. 

S. J. Pipitone '37 

S. J. Pipitone '37, has been named 
manager of the Airframe Installations 
Design for the 
Goodyear Aircraft 
Corp. He has had 
extensive design ex- 
perience and for 
thirteen years was 
wing design engi- 
neer at the Glenn L. 
Martin Company; 
chief of airframes 
design for one year 
at Canadair Ltd., 
Montreal; and for 
three years chief of 
design operations at Chance Vought 
Aircraft Company, Dallas, Texas. 
James B. Wong '50 
James B. Wong '50, has joined the 
staff of the Whiting Research Labora- 
tories of Standard Oil Company (Indi- 
ana). He obtained his Ph.D. degree in 
chemical engineering at the University 
of Illinois. He is a member of the 
American Chemical Society. 

"Maryland" 




Mr. Pipitone 




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21 



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HONORS AND AWARDS DINNER 

u ashington Times-HeraXA 

Maryland's "M" Club, combined 
forces with the Baltimore Alum- 
ni Club for the third annual M Club 
dinner at the Emerson Hotel in Balti- 
more. 

George Munger, president of the 
American Football Coaches association, 
was the principal speaker and used his 
speech to laud the Terps' football team 
and coach Jim Tatum. 

Praising the team and coach for 
their national No. 1 ratings, Munger 
recalled with a smile that Pennsyl- 
vania, where he is athletic director and 
a former coach, once shellacked Mary- 
land, 50-0. "But," he added, "we 
couldn't come anywhere near that 
now." 

Four All-Americas 

Four Maryland All-America athletes 
were honored guests but Bernie Fa- 
loney, whose injured knee got him 
more publicity than his brilliant quar- 
terbacking of the nation's No. 1 team, 
was missing. 

Faloney was being married to his 
campus sweetheart — Janice Wallace — 
and by the time soup was on, the great 
Terp all-around athlete and his bride 
were on their way to a honeymoon in 
the Poconos. 

Athletic director and head football 
coach Tatum stood-in for his missing 
quarterback and then made a second 
trip to the rostrum, to receive an award 
of his own. The other All-Americas 
honored by the school lettermen were 
tackle Stan Jones and Elwood R. Bar- 
ton and Roy E. Oster, of Maryland's 
national championship rifle team. 

Surprise Award 

In addition to his M club trophy, 
Jones received a surprise award from 
the Phillip Morris company, an en- 
graved wristwatch presented by the 
cigaret firm's famed "Johnny," em- 
blematic of the Terp tackle's selection 
to the company's All-America team. 

Receiving honorary memberships in 
the "M" club and special citations were 
former heavyweight champion Jack 
Dempsey, former Gov. Preston Lane 
of Maryland, Glenn L. Martin, Balti- 
more airplane manufacturer; Bud Mill- 
ikan, Maryland's outstanding basket- 
ball mentor, and Fred I. Archibald, pub- 
lisher of the Baltimore News-Post. 

Former Senator Millard E. Tydings 



was master of ceremonies, and Dr. 
Harry C. Byrd, president emeritus of 
the university, made the All-America 
presentations. Byrd also handed Tat- 
um a scroll awarded annually by the 
National Collegiate Athletic associa- 
tion to the nation's No. 1 football 
team. 

Dr. Byrd lauded ex-Governor Lane 
for his many contributions to the state 
and the university as he presented 
the M club honorary membership. He 
credited Lane with securing the funds 
to build the 37,000 capacity Byrd stad- 
ium, and the new field house now under 
construction. 

More Honors 

Colonel William Triplett, President, 
representing the University of Mary- 
land Alumni Club of Baltimore also 
presented awards to Dr. Harry C. Byrd, 
President Emeritus; Dr. B. Olive Cole, 
Professor Emeritus, School of Phar- 
macy. 

Twenty-five high school football 
coaches and nine area grid mentors 
were among the huge crowd that gath- 
ered at the Emerson Hotel for the din- 
ner. 

The guest list also included Curley 
Lambeau, Washington Redskin coach; 
Jimmy Dykes, new manager of the 
new Baltimore Oriole baseball team; 
Clair Bee, Baltimore Bullets owner- 
coach; Jack Hagerty, athletic director 
at Georgetown; George P. Marshall, 
Redskin owner-coach, and Calvin Grif- 
fith, Jr., vice-president of the Washing- 
ton baseball team, and manager Bucky 
Harris. 

Other distinguished guests were: 
Judge W. P. Cole, a member of the 
board of regents at the university; 
Gov. Theodore R. McKeldin, Mayor 
Thomas D'Alesandro, Eugene (Bo) 
Sherman, George Washington grid 
mentor; Harry L. Merrick, Washing- 
ton Board of Trade, and Joseph Lynch, 
president of the Washington Touch- 
down Club. 

One of the highlights of the dinner 
was the 15-minute showing of Mary- 
land-Oklahoma Orange Bowl pictures. 

Plans are underway for a meeting 
of the Baltimore Alumni group for a 
date in April. Details will come through 
the mail to members. 

The "M" Club owes a special thanks 

of appreciation to such members as: 

Charles P. Kllenger, General Chairman 
Joe Deckman — Program 
Sum Silber — Arrangements 
Milt Vandenbcrg — Tickets and Reception 
Bucky Miller — Program and Arrangements 
Ford I/ohrer — Advisory and Correspondent 
Albert Heagy Advisory and Correspondent 
Ralph G. Shure — 1953 President 
Maurice Schwartzman — Publicity 

These members and many more for their 
tireless efforts throughout the year. 

Praise For Dr. Cole 

In making the presentation to Dr. 
Olive B. Cole, Dr. Triplett said, "Dr. 
Cole's association with the University 
of Maryland began when she matricu- 
lated in the School of Pharmacy Octo- 
ber 1, 1910. On May 31, 1913 she was 



22 



"Maryland" 




Dr. Cole 



graduated with the de- 
gree of Doctor of Phar- 
macy, at which time 
she was awarded the 
Gold Medal for general 
excellence. In 1920 she 
again became actively 
identified with the Uni- 
versity, having then 
been appointed Secre- 
tary of the Faculty of 
the School of Phar- 
macy, a position she 
occupied with distinc- 
tion until statutory retirement in No- 
vember 1953. 

Many Assignments 
"In the meantime she was actively 
engaged in teaching and included 
among the positions held were: Asso- 
ciate Professor of Botany and Materia 
Medica in the School of Pharmacy from 
1920 to 1928; Lecturer in Pharmaceuti- 
cal Law from 1923 to 1928; Associate 
Professor of Economics and Pharma- 
ceutical Law from 1928 to 1947; and 
full Professor from 1947 until her re- 
tirement last November — at which 
time she was given the title of Pro- 
fessor Emerita of Pharmacy Admin- 
istration. 

"In addition to these enumerated as- 
sociations and activities Dr. Cole found 
time to enroll in the first class opened 
to women by the School of Law and 
in 1923 was graduated with the degree 
of Bachelor of Law, the first woman 
to receive a law degree from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. In that field she 
has also earned distinction and is a 
member of the Bar in both the City 
and State. 

Also Wrote 

Her interests have also been reflected 
in the field of Journalism. She has been 
a collaborator on the American Jour- 
nal of Pharmacetuical Education, 
Maryland Pharmacist, Maryland Alum- 
ni Magazine and other journals. 

"We of the Baltimore Club believe 
this brief resume of Dr. Cole's service 
to the University merits more than 
mere recognition; more than any ma- 
terial reminder we could proffer — she 
has posted a record in the annals of 
University history for both ourselves 
and our progeny to admire and left a 
pattern we hope some of our future 
students will try to emulate. 



3-WAY JOB 

Charles J, Herbert, captain of the 
1951 Maryland team, has been ap- 
pointed lacrosse coach at Washington 
and Lee. He will also coach soccer and 
serve as physical education instructor. 




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Pittsburgh Alumni 

Alumni of the Pittsburgh area joined 
for the third annual football banquet 
at the University Club on January 29. 
President Martin L. Brotemarkle pre- 
sided over the gathering of approxi- 
mately eighty. 

Dr. Joseph Finegold, an alumnus who 
served as team physician for the Pitts- 
burgh Pirates, made an excellent toast- 
master. With the help of Maryland's 
line coach, Jack Hennemier, he intro- 
duced a number of the Maryland foot- 
ball players. These included Chester 
Hanulak, Dick Nolan, Ralph Bairel, 
Mart; Crytzer, John Irvine, Blubber 
Morgan, and Ralph Felton, who was 
married the following day. 

Dave Brigham, Alumni Secretary, 
and Col. 0. H. Saunders, Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Alumni Association, spoke 
on the development of the University 
and affairs of the Alumni Association. 

The banquet concluded with a show- 
ing of highlights of the 1953 football 
season. The film was narrated by 
Coach Hennemier. 

At a luncheon meeting prior to the 
banquet, club projects and activities 
were discussed. Consideration was giv- 
en to steps to encourage subscriptions 
to the Alumni Magazine, assistance in 
directing outstanding prospective stu- 
dents and the development of up to 
date Alumni rosters. Present for the 
discussion in addition to Brotemarkle, 
Brigham and Saunders, there were Dr. 
Finegold, vice-pi-esident Chuck Furt- 
ney, past presidents Herbert 0. Eby 
and Gordon Kessler, and Ernest Trim- 
ble. 



O.D.K. 

Eighteen outstanding male students 
of the University of Maryland were 
tapped for Omicron Delta Kappa, Na- 
tional men's honorary society, from 
one or more of the phases of college 
life represented by society, scholar- 
ship, athletics, social and religious af- 
fairs, publications, speech, music, or 
dramatics. 

Alumnus William Hoff was recog- 
nized for outstanding service to stu- 
dents. He is manager of the Rec Hall 
and will be manager of the new stu- 
dent union building. 

Tapped for athletics were: Martin 
R. Crytzer, Bernie Faloney, Chester 
Hanulak, William E. Fischer, Stanley 
Jones, and Victor Jungk. 

Charles Waggner was recognized 
for scholarship and athletics. 

Tapped for activity in music and 
dramatics were James Blackwell and 
William Price. Stuart Jones, Frank 
Weedon, and Morris Lebowitz were 
recognized for performance on student 
publications. 

Tapped for social activities were 
James Arnold, William Kline, Richard 
Cox, and Dave Bowers. 

Gerald Longanecker was recognized 
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t 9 e 



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Anderson — Erskiite 

Marcia Erskine, Maryland alumna, 
to Ernest V. Anderson. 
Mow en — Hale 
Saly Hale, to Dr. Thales Bowen, Jr., 
Maryland alumnus. 

Bresler — Straus 
Alma Fleur Straus, to Charles S. 
Bresler, Maryland alumnus. 
Cottell— Carter 
June Spencer Carter, to Alfred Cot- 
trell, Maryland graduate. 

Crepeau — Corn well 
I'egge Allen Cornwell, Maryland 
alumna, to Maj. Victor Joseph Crepeau, 
USAF. 

Davis — Douglas 
Janet Glvndine Douglas, 
graduate, to Airman 1st CI 
Davis. 

Delozier — Kneen 
Nancy May Kneen, Maryland 
uate, to Lynn Delozier. 

DeStefano — Harrison 
Nancy Harrison, Maryland student, 
to Robert Peter DeStefano, Maryland 
alumna, Sigma Chi. 

Dorey — Heck 
Miriam Matlack Heck, Maryland 
graduate, to Derek V. Dorey. 
Faloney — Wallace 
Elizabeth Wallace, 
to Bernie Faloney, 



Maryland 
ass, Jack 



grad- 



Maryland 
Maryland 



Janet 
student, 
senior. 

Felton — Davidson 
Carol Davidson, Midway, Pa., to 
Ralph Felton, Maryland backfield foot- 
ball star. 

Figgat — Godfrey 
Patricia Diane Godfrey, Maryland 
graduate, to Winfield S. Figgat, Jr. 
Franciosi — Kroeger 
Dorothy H. Kroeger, Maryland grad- 
uate, to Francesca Franciosi. 
Gribben — Lynn 
Margaret Acheson Lynn, Maryland 
alumna, to Raymond Leonard Gribben. 
Grollman — Braff 
Elaine Braff, to Rabbi Jerome W. 
Grollman, Maryland graduate. 
Haines — Dunn 
Barbara Pearl Dunn, Maryland grad- 
uate, to Clifford F. Haines. 
Hoffman — Brown 
Mary Anne Hoffman, to James Leon- 
ard Brown, Sigma Nu, Maryland 
graduate. 

Hover male — Dover 
Pita Dover, to 2d LT. Howard Wil- 
son Hovermale, USAF. Both are 
Maryland graduates. 

Joften — Rogerson 
Carolyn Ruth Rogerson, Maryland 
graduate, to John J. Joften. 



Krawitz Getz 
Vivian Lee Getz, Maryland graduate 
to Dr. Irvin .M. Krawitz, .Maryland 
Dental School graduate. 
Krone — Rapp 
Eleanor Elizabeth Rapp to NorriB J. 
Krohe, Jr., Maryland student. 
Lunter — Stocketl 
Peggy Ann Stockett, to Paul F. Lun- 
ter, Maryland alumnus. 

Miller— Blahul 
Dolores A. Blahut, Maryland gradu- 
ate, to Charles Miller. 

Modzelewskj — Welsh 
Dorothy Welsh, to Richard (Little 
Mo) Modzelewski, Maryland graduate. 
and outstanding college lineman of 
1952. 

Mosley — Walker 
Sue Eileen Walker, to Richard Harry 
Mosley, Maryland graduate. 
Neady — Waters 
Joan Catherine Waters, to John 
Gordon Neady, Maryland graduate. 
Norton — Jonscher 
Nancy Elizabeth Jonscher, Montgom- 
ery Junior College, to John H. Norton, 
Maryland senior. 

Pierce — Davis 
Lillian Rae Davis, senior in Physical 
Education, Delta Gamma, to Ronald 
H. Pierce, (B&PA '53), Delta Sigma 
Phi, former President of the S.G.A. 
and the Interfraternity Council; '53 
winner of the Citizenship award and 
the Men's League Cup. 

Pat ton — Buehler 
Patricia Alma Buehler, Maryland 
alumna, to Sgt. Emory Robert Patton, 
USMC (Ret.). 

Perl— Herdt 
Marjorie Patricia Herdt, Maryland 
graduate, Delta Delta Delta, to Dr. 
Edward Roy Perl. 

Raymond — Andrews 
Dorothy C. Andrews, Delta Delta 
Delta, to Lt. William J. Raymond, 
USAF, Delta Sigma Pi, and Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon. Both are Maryland 
graduates. 

Renshaw — Strong 
Nancy Jean Strong, Maryland grad- 
uate, to Morris L. Renshaw. 
Seiler — Olson 
Janet Virginia Olson, to Lt. Richard 
Frank Seiler, USAF, Maryland grad- 
uate. 

Smith — Savage 
Maude Savage, to Malcolm B. Smith, 
Maryland alumnus. 

Strain — Delaney 
Mary Delaney, Maryland graduate, 
to Thomas Strain. 

Thayer — Ramsburg 
Helena Louise Ramsburg, Maryland 
graduate, to Carl R. Thayer. 
Waller — Gray 
Nancy Ann Grav to Lt. Alan Murray 
Waller, USAF, Delta Sigma Pi. Both 
are Maryland graduates. 



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Weber — Schafer 

Alice Creasap Schafer, Maryland 
graduate, to Donald S. Weber. 
Whitney — Fresen 
Nancy Ann Fresen, Maryland grad- 
uate, to James Henry Whitney, Mary- 
land alumnus. 

Wisner — Limn 
Barbara Jane Lunn, Maryland alum- 
na, to Albert DeVola Wisner, Maryland 
alumnus. 

Vander grift — Jones 
Barbara Louise Jones, to Franklin 
Edward Yandergrift, Maryland alum- 
nus. 




\Jn ZJheir ■U'it 



r ri . 



Adams — Spencer 

Helen O. Adams, Maryland alumna, 
to Roger H. Spencer. 
Andrews — Raymond 
Dorothy C. Andrews, Delta Delta 
Delta, to Lt. William J. Raymond, 
USAF, Delta Sigma Pi, and Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon, both are Maryland 
graduates. 

Annenberg — Weinberg 
Phyllis Annenberg, to Franklyn Jos- 
eph Weinberg, Maryland graduate, and 
student at Maryland School of Law. 
Atkinson — Barrett 
Judith Ceclia Atkinson, Maryland 
student, Kappa Alpha Theta, to Rich- 
ard Earl Barrett, Maryland graduate, 
Alpha Gamma Rho. 

Atkinson — Mast 
Lois Atkinson, Maryland graduate, 
to Joseph M. Mast, U.S.C.G. 
Ayres — Lanham 
Nina Louise Ayres, Maryland senior, 
Delta Gamma, to James Ottaway Lan- 
ham III, Maryland alumnus, Sigma Nu. 
Ba gby — Schnabel 
Barbara Bagby, Maryland student, 
Kappa Alpha Theta, to Robert V. 
Schnabel. 

Bancroft — Warburton 
Eleanor Bancroft, Maryland student, 
to Donald LeRoy Warburton. 
Baybutt — Lyden 
Elizabeth Audrey Baybutt, to Ed- 
ward Earl Lyden, Jr., Phi Delta Chi, 
graduate of Maryland School of Phar- 
macy. 

Berlage — Frederick 

Beverly Anslyn Berlage, to Carl Le- 
roy Frederick, Jr., both Maryland stu- 
dents. 

Birkhead — Worsley 

Anne Watson Birkhead, to Dr. Thom- 
as Luther Worsley, graduate of Mary- 
land Medical school. 

Brohawn — Rhodes 

Jane Estelle Brohawn, to Walter E. 
Rhodes, Jr., Maryland graduate, Delta 
Tau Delta. 

Brown — Hoffman 

Mary Anne Brown, to James Leon- 
ard Hoffman, Maryland alumnus, Sig- 
ma Nu. 

Bubes — Rubin 

Ruth Nancy Bubes, to Sheldon Arn- 




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measure of my success to my wife, whose 
constant nagging and insatiable desire for 
material wealth . . " 



26 



old Rubin. Both are Maryland gradu- 
ates. 

Carroll — Keane 
Margaret Marie Carrol, Maryland 
alumna, Delta Gamma, to Ensign 
James P. Keane, U.S.N. 

Carroll — Owens 
Agnes Cecilia Carroll, to Alan Cle- 
phane Owens, Maryland alumnus. 
Chaikin — Orlove 
Myra Dorothy Chaikin, to William 
S. Orlove, Maryland graduate, Zeta 
Beta Tau. 

Chusman — Sollod 
Diane Chusman, to Ronald Lee Sol- 
lod, Maryland student, Tau Epsilon 
Phi. 

Cleary — Rapp 
Jeannie Audrey Cleary, to Dr. Ray- 
mond Edward Rapp, Jr., Maryland 
alumnus. 

Clements — Brierley 
Nancy Lea Clements, Maryland stu- 
dent, Delta Gamma, and Omicron Nu, 
to Gerald Philip Brierley, Maryland 
graduate, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, and 
Phi Kappa Phi, and Phi Eta Sigma. 
Conklin — Hughes 
Carol Conklin, to Wallace Hughes, 
Jr., Maryland student. 

Condron — Sykes 
Margery Condron, Alpha Gamma 
Delta, to Horace F. Sykes, Tau Beta 
Pi, and Sigma Phi Epsilon. Both are 
Maryland seniors. 

Cooper — Friedlander 
Vicki Ann Cooper, to Harvey Lee 
Friedlander, Maryland student, Alpha 
Epsilon Phi. 

Corbet t — Jackson 

Betty Carol Corbett, to Donald R. 
Jackson, Maryland graduate. 
Cox— Hill 

Alice Patricia Cox, Maryland alum- 
na, Alpha Xi Delta, to Vincent Hill. 

Crow — Kiser 

Eugenia M. Crow, to Dr. William S. 
Kiser, both Maryland graduates. 
Crews — McMahon 

Anne Elizabeth Crews, Maryland 
graduate, Kappa Kappa Theta, to Lt. 

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"CLOTHES OF CHARACTER" 

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Charles St. at Redwood 
Baltimore, Md. 



(j.g.) .Mart in J. MrMahon, U.S.N. 

Dilli Bnghoi 
Naiic) Tucker Dilli, to Harrj I 
Hughes, Maryland alumnus. 

Mukle Judge 

Margaret Estelle I tinkle, Alpha 
Gamma Delta, Maryland senior, to Wil- 
liam Frederick .Indue, Maryland grad- 
uate. 

Dorfler — Hoataon 

Betty Ann Dorfler, Maryland stu- 
dent, to Donald Wallace Hoatson. 

Prayer — Taylor 
Porothy Mae Prayer, to Donald K. 
Taylor, Maryland senior, Sigma Alpha 
F'psilon. 

Puey — Martin 

Muriell Puey, Maryland graduate, to 
Norman L. Martin. 

Punand - Hosendorf 

Anne Marie Punand, to Stanley Her 
nard Hosendorf, Maryland graduate. 

Elliot— Presscl 
Patricia May Elliot, Maryland stu- 
dent, Alpha Omicron Pi, to Charles 
Wilson Pressel, Jr., USA, Maryland 
alumnus, Phi Kappa Sigma. 

England — Tysdal 

Nancy Ann England, Maryland sen- 
ior, to Lt. (jg) Royal M. Tysdal. 

Essex — Longanecker 

Joan Porman, Maryland student, to 
Gerald Longanecker, Omicron Pelta 
Kappa, Tau Beta Pi, Scabbard and 
Blade, a Maryland student. 

Falk — Rabineau 

Eda Falk, Maryland graduate to 
Norman Rabineau, Maryland Law stu- 
dent. 

Fine — Jacobs 

Anita Rose Fine, to Robert Gilman 
Jacobs, Maryland alumnus, Sigma Al- 
pha Mu. 

Freed — Goodman 

June Freed, Maryland student to 
Leonard Goodman, Maryland Law 
school graduate, Nu Beta Epsilon. 

Fohrman — Herndon 

Phyllis Loy Fohrman, to William 
Herndon. Both are Maryland gradu- 
ates. 

Ford — Werness 

Barbara Beatrice Ford, Maryland 
alumna, to Midshipman Maurice Harry 
Werness. 

Forrester — Watt 

Betty Evelyn Forrester, to Ronald 
F. Watt, Maryland alumnus. 

Gabrill— Goldberg 

Eleanor Jane Gabrill, to Yale Leon- 
ard Goldberg, Maryland student. 

Gair — Oppegard 
Mary Lelita Gair, to Winfield Henry 
Oppegard, Maryland graduate. 

Galloway — Dabney 

Ponna Galloway, to Linwood M. Pab- 
ney, Maryland alumnus. 

Goldsborough — Bunk 

Margaret we n s Goldsborough, 
Maryland student, to Robert Harold 
Bunk, Jr. 



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Gordon — Snider 
Myrna Gordon, to Edward M. Snider, 
Maryland student, Sigma Alpha Mu, 
and Beta Alpha Psi. 

Hardy — Burch 
Xelle Christine Hardy, Alpha Omi- 
cron Pi, to Walter D. Burch, Delta Sig- 
ma Phi. Both are Maryland graduates. 
Harper — Snyder 
Jo Ann Harper, to James R. Snyder, 
Jr., Maryland student. 

Hendrickson — Latham 
Nancy Hendrickson, to Richard 
Bruce Latham, graduate of Maryland 
University and Maryland University 
School of Law, Gamma Eta Gamma. 
Highstein — Snyder 
Cevia Highstein, to Sidney S. Snyd- 
er, student at Maryland Dental School. 
Hogan — Spartana 
Lillian M. Hogan, to Anthony R. 
Spartana, Jr., Maryland Law School 
student. 

Hutchins — Breunich 

Constance Anne Hutchins, to Thomas 
H. Breunich, both Maryland students. 
Johnson — Lawther 

Ellen Marie Johnson, Kappa Kappa 
Gamma, Maryland student, to John 
Wheeler Lawther. „ 

Katz — Shapiro 

Irene Katz, to Paul Shapiro, Mary- 
land student. 

Katzenstein — Goodman 
Alice Helene Katzenstein, to William 
R. Goodman, Maryland graduate, Tau 
Epsilon Phi. 

Keesling — Phucas 
Carol Geline Kessling, alumna Wash- 
ington School For Secretaries, to 
Charles B. Phucas, Maryland senior. 
Kemp — Harris 
Patricia Joan Kemp, Maryland jun- 
ior, Gamma Phi Beta, to David N. Har- 
ris, USAF. 

Kifer — Closson 
Mary Ann Kifer, Maryland gradu- 
ate, to Harold Otis Closson, Jr., Mary- 
land student. 

Korn — Michelson 
Rita Ann Korn, Maryland alumna, 
Alpha Epsilon Phi, to Warren D. 
Michelson. 

Kramer — Gray 
Jean Kramer, to Dorsey Gray, Jr., 
Maryland alumnus. 

Levin — Prostic 

Eileen Levin, to Albert Prostic, USA, 
Maryland School of Pharmacy gradu- 
ate. 

Lindauer — Hicks 

Mary Constance Lindauer, Maryland 
alumna, to Midshipman James Nelson 
Hicks, Jr. 

Lipman — Smilow 

Joan Helene Lipman, Maryland stu- 
dent, to Joel Smilow. 

Lyons — Murphy 

Nancy Louise Lyons, to Robert P. 
Murphy, Maryland School of Dentis- 
try. 

MacAloney — Blackwell 

Kathleen MacAloney, to James Day- 
ton Blackwell, both Maryland students. 



Marshall — Ford 

Barbara Joanna Marshall, Maryland 
student, Delta Gamma, to Midshipman 
William H. Ford. 

Mateer — Seyfried 

Dorothy Louise Mateer, Maryland 
student, Pi Beta Phi, to Pvt. Edmund 
E. Seyfried, Jr., Maryland alumnus. 
McAlpine — Ganzhorn 

Joan Helen McAlpine, to Michael 
William Ganzhorn, USA, Maryland 
alumnus. 

McCeney — Potter 

Elizabeth Anne McCeney, Maryland 
alumna, Alpha Xi Delta, to Thomas 
Moore Potter, Maryland graduate, 
Theta Phi. 

McLaughlin— Tall 

Barbara McLaughlin, to Gerard B. 
Tall, Maryland student. 

McNamara — McAlister 

Nay Brooke McNamara to Charles 
K. McAlister, Jr., student at Maryland. 

Mitchell — Osborne 

Marguerite Mitchell, to Henry H. Os- 
borne, Jr., Maryland graduate, USAF, 
veteran, World War II. 

Mouser — Fellows 

Elizabeth Mouser, Maryland senior, 
to Frank C. Fellows, Jr., Maryland 
graduate. 

Naiman — Kaufman 

Barbara Jean Naiman, Maryland 
student, Phi Sigma Sigma, to Richard 
M. Kaufman. 

Neeley — Grosse 
Joanne Neeley, to Henry Hurter 
Grosse, Maryland alumnus. 

Nolan — Hepburn 

Marguerite Rose Cassassa Nolan, 
to Sgt. William Thomas Hepburn, 
USAF, Maryland alumnus. 

Norris — DeMoss 
Joan Marie Norris, to Wayne Alan 
DeMoss. Both are Maryland students. 

Owen — Sorenson 
Patricia Anne Owens, Maryland stu- 
dent, to Wayne R. Sorenson, Maryland 
alumnus. 

Packham — Moring 

Doris Jeanne Packham, to John Love 
Moring, Jr., Maryland Law school stu- 
dent. 

Paregol — Salins 

Deborah Paregol, Maryland student, 
Phi Delta, to Richard Salins. 

Pence — Hawthorne 
Jane Dean Pence, Maryland senior, 
to Archibald C. Hawthorne, Maryland 
graduate, now attending Graduate 
School, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Beta 
Gamma Sigma, Phi Eta Sigma and Phi 
Kappa Phi. 

Phillips — Schweizer 

Amenie Nelson Phillips, to Hans 
Donald Schweizer. Both are Mary- 
land students. 

Reeves — Nowell 

Virginia Carolyn Reeves, Maryland 
student, Tri Delta and Phi Kapa Phi, 
to John F. Newell, Maryland Medical 
student. 



28 



"Maryland" 



Rose — Silver 

Janet Rose, Maryland alumna, to 
Stanley Leonard Silver, Maryland 
graduate. 

Rosenberg — Reiser 
Irma Rosenberg-, to Don Reiser. 
Maryland graduate .student. 

Rossi nv — Whit ting ton 
Bettie Catherine Rossing-, to J. Ron- 
ald Whiltiivton, 3d, Maryland alum- 
nus. 

< a ii hi ii — Jacobs 

Barbara A. Scanlan, to Charles D. 
Jacobs, Maryland graduate. 




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Schreiber — Bonanno 
Patricia Ann Schreiber, to Ted A. 
Bonanno, Maryland graduate. 
Schwartz — Wall 
Beverly Schwartz, to George H. 
Wall, Maryland graduate, and student 
at Maryland School of Medicine. 
Seal — Roycroft 
Barbara Lee Seal, Maryland junior, 
Kappa Delta, to Lt. Howard Francis 
Roycroft, Maryland graduate, Kappa 
Alpha. 

Sim pson — Locke 
Anne Simpson, Maryland graduate, 
Beta Phi chapter of Alpha Delta Pi, to 
Robert P. Locke. 

Smith — Jewell 
Carolyn Tuttle Smith, Montgomery 
Junior College graduate, to David S. 
Jewell, Maryland senior. 

Smithson — Nida 
Joanne Helen Smithson, to Edward 
Robert Nida. Both are Maryland stu- 
dents. 

Snyder — Moffett 

Marilyn Orme Snyder, Maryland stu- 
dent, Kappa Delta, to Lt. Raymond C. 
Moffett, Jr., Maryland alumnus, Alpha 
Tau Omega. 

Sorel — Gordon 

Claudette Marguerite Sorel, to Mid- 
shipman Stewart Lynell Gordon, Mary- 
land alumnus. 



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Sweeney — Jansson 
Mary Jean Sweeney, to Richard 
Martin Jansson, both Maryland stu- 
dents. 

Tierney — Grant 
Deirdre Patricia Tierney, Maryland 
student, to Conrad Joseph Grant. 
Thomas — Newsome 
Jo Ann Thomas, Maryland student, 
Sigma Kappa, to Wesley Alexander 
Newsome, U. S. Naval Academy. 
Tudge — Wilson 
Sandra Anne Tudge, to Wallace 
Cleveland Wilson, Maryland student. 
Walker — Nolan 
Jacqueline E. Walker, to Philip P. 
Nolan, Maryland Dental School stu- 
dent. 

Welch — Cohee 
Patricia Ann Welch, to Richard Ar- 
len Cohee, Maryland student. 
Wheeler — Lynch 
Joyce Wheeler, to John Donald 
Lynch, Maryland alumnus. 

Whittlesey — Brafford 
Dorothy Ellen Whittlesey, Southern 
Seminary and Junior College, to Sam- 
uel Brafford, Jr., Maryland alumnus. 

Willey— DeBurr 

Barbara Willey, to Stephen L. De- 
Burr, Maryland alumnus. 

Wilson — Obercash 

Anita Ruth Wilson, Alpha Gamma 
Delta, and Alpha Lambda Delta, sopho- 
more at Maryland, to Paul Barry 
Obercash, Phi Kappa Tau, Maryland 
graduate. 

Wittenberg— Cohen 

Harriet Lee Wittenberg, Maryland 
alumna, to Jerry Carl Cohen, Maryland 
alumnus. 

Wood — Schwab 

Eleanor Arlyle Wood, Kappa Delta, 
Maryland senior, to Paul C. Schwab, 
Phi Delta, Maryland graduate. 

Woodside — Swearingen 

Mary Joanne Woodside, Maryland 
senior, to Raymond 0. Swearingen. 

Wright — Harris 
Annabelle Wright, to Henry Robert 
Harris, Maryland alumnus. 

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School Of Nursing Arrivals 

To Mr. and Mrs. Leo Kridle, a son, 
William Leo. born on May 24, 1953. 
Mrs. Kridle was Ada Margaret Watson, 
'40. They also have a daughter, Mary 
Margaret, born on November 14, 1950. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Miller, 
a son, Stephen, born on July 17, 1953. 
Mrs. Miller was Marjorie Brigham, '44. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Thomas, 
Jr., a daughter, Sandra Jean, on June 
7, 1953. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas have a 
son, David two years old. Mrs. Thom- 
as was Nancy Amadon, '49. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Louis H. Kraus, 
Jr., a daughter, Ann Louise, on Novem- 
ber 23, 1953. Mrs. Krals was Elizabeth 
Warfield, '52. 

To Lt. and Mrs. James L. Cox, a 
daughter, Tambery Jean, on August 
15, 1953. Mrs. Cox was Esther Gar- 
rett, '42. 

To Captain and Mrs. Robert C. Hunt- 
er, a daughter, Bonita Lynn, on Oc- 
tober 28, 1953. Mrs. Hunter was Grace 
M. Colburn, '48. They have a son two 
years old named after his father. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Jerome M. Cohn, 
a son, Mark, on December 16, 1953. 
Mrs. Cohn was Gloria Waters, 48. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Bill Corpening, a 
daughter, Amy Avis, on November 19, 
1953. (Mrs. Corpening, writes, "This 
brings our batting average up to five 
(three boys, and two girls). Mrs. 
Corpening was Avis Simons, '44. 

To Mr. and Mrs. George Lamar Ray- 
burn, a son, Charles Lamar, on No- 
vember 2, 1953. Mrs. Rayburn was 
Joan Elaine Gleason, '50. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edmund Joseph Di- 
Carlo, a son, Edward Francis William, 
on November 29, 1953. Mrs. DiCarlo 
was Dorothy Emma Koerner, '49. 

Dr. and Mrs. Louis Calvin Gareis, 
twin daughters, Susanne Margaret, and 
Barbara Rose, on December 6, 1953. 
Mrs. Gareis was Edna Cecilia Nester, 
'40. 



30 



'Maryland" 



To Dr. and Mrs. Drennan P. (iassa- 
way, a son, Michael Drennan, on Aug- 
ust 4, 1952. Mrs. Cassaway was Ruth 
Michaels, '43. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Berkley A. Bruns- 
don, a daughter, Carol Ellen, on April 
4, 1!)53. They also have a daughter, 
Susan, 22 months old. Mrs. Brunsdon 
was Elizabeth Nennelee, '35. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Frank 1'. Mont- 
gomery, a daughter, Robin Pierce, on 
July 7, 1953. They have another daugh- 
ter, Joyce Tracey, 22 months old. Mrs. 
Montgomery was Lorraine Brechriel, 
'44. 

No. 5 

The Medical School Bulletin states 
Dr. and Mrs. Bill Corpening announce 
the arrival of daughter Amy Aviz on. 
November 18, 1953. This brings the 
batting average to five; three boys and 
two girls. 

In Lansing. Michigan 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert Digby (Dora- 
mae Rowe, Edu. '41) announce the 
birth of their third boy, Roger Wayne 
on November 28, 1953.' 



QTapH 



Gordon Dittmar 

Dr. Gordon Dittmar, A&S '37, was 
awarded his Ph.D. in Organic 
Chemistry in 1941, died at the age of 
37 from a cerebral hemorrhage at In- 
dianfield, Delaware. 

Dr. Dittmar was Research Chemist 
with the Hercules Powder Company. 
He is survived by his wife and two 
children, as well as his parents and a 
brother. 

Joseph S. Lann, A&S '37, Ph.D. '41, 
was one of the pallbearers. 
C. E. Wilson 

Charles Eugene Wilson, nationally 
known pharmacy leader, who received 
his Doctorate from the University in 
1913, died recently at Corinth, Miss- 
issippi. 

Mr. Wilson served as first vice- 
president of the American Pharma- 
ceutical Association in 1944 and at 
one time as president of the American 
College of Apothecaries. He began 
his career in Bamberg, S. C. In 1918 
he moved to Corinth and in 1921 estab- 
lished the Wilson Drug Company. 
Eugene W. Hodson 

Eugene W. Hodson, graduated from 
the College of Pharmacy in 1893, died 
in late November in Baltimore. He 
was associated with Thomas and 
Thompson for many years. He was a 
Past-President of the Maryland Phar- 
maceutical Association. He was inter- 
ested in the General Alumni Associa- 
tion of the Baltimore Schools of the 
University, previous to the reorganiza- 
tion of the Alumni Association of the 
School of Pharmacy in 1926. 
J. Harry Stutt 

J. Harry Stutt, class of 1893 in 
Pharmacy, died in November in Flush- 
ing, Long Island, New York. Burial 
was in Baltimore. 



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Blue Room 

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7 p.m. Floor Show, 10 p.m. ex- 
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81 




Coach Of The Year 



llTll 



-Tcrp Tatum Tabbed Top Tutor 

Coaches' Ballots Elect Big Jim To No. 1 Spot Among 

Nation's Leading Ten Grid Mentors As He 

Accords Credit To Assistants 




arj land's Jim Tatuin 
was named coach of 
the year in a record 
hallot of the Amer- 
ican Football Coach- 
es' Association. 

The annual poll 
was conducted by the 
New York World- 
Telegram and Sun for the Scripps- 
Howard Newspapers. Of the member- 
ship of 696 coaches, 599 voted. Tatum 
received the award at the annual din- 
ner of the association in Cincinnati, in 
connection with the NCAA convention. 
Tatum, whose Terrapins won the 
O'Donnell Trophy emblematic of the 
national championship, received 151 
votes to 111 for Red Sanders, whose 
UCLA team won the Pacific Coast title 
and the West Coast representation in 
the Rose Bowl. 

Typical Reaction 
Big Jim's re-action was typical of 
him. He said, "I wish there could be 
an award to the Coaching Staff of the 
Year. My staff should have gotten the 
recognition. Because of the help of 
my assistants, I believe I coached less 
this season than in any previous one. 
"For the first time in the history of 
Maryland, there were no changes on 
the football coaching staff last year, 
and all the assistants knew what I 
wanted," said Tatum. "That made my 
job easier than it has ever been." 

Tatum's staff includes Jack Henne- 
mier, Tommy Mont, Warren Giese, 
Emmett Cheek, Vern Siebert, Eddie 
Teague, Bob Ward and Bill Dovell, as 
well as Trainer Duke Wyre and as- 
sistant trainer John Lacey. Working 
shoulder to shoulder with Tatum is 
Maryland Alumnus Bill Cobey, grad- 
uate Manager of Athletics. 

The Coach of the year poll showed 
coaches ranked as follows: 
The "Big Ten" 
l. Jim Tatum, Maryland. 
u Red Sanders. DCLA. 

3. Forest Evasnevski, Iowa. 

4. Frank Leahy. Notre Dame, 

5. Ray Eliot, Illinois. 

ft. Ralph Jordan, Auburn, 
7. George M linger, Perm. 
8 ivy Williamson, Wisconsin. 
!). Bar] Blaik, Army. 
10. Art Lewis, West Virginia ; and Paul 

Bryant, Kentucky. 

The principal address at the Cin- 
cinnati NCAA Convention was made 
by Dr. H. C. Byrd, of the University 
of Maryland, the entire ceremony be- 
ing featured on a national TV pro- 
gram. Over 600 coaches attended. 

"College football and other such 
competitive sports," said Dr. Byrd, 
"are the basis for what makes America 
a great nation." 

"If I was someone who wanted to 



destroy the element that gives America 
greatness, I would knock out competi- 
tive sports," Dr. Byrd continued. 

Referring to critics of big time foot- 
ball, Dr. Byrd went on to say, "Amer- 
ica has grown great and if anyone 
criticizes football because it has grown 
big, I wonder if he has kept up with 
the growth of America." 

In presenting the "Coach of the 
Year" trophy to Tatum, Dr. Byrd 
turned to the coaches and said: 

"I present him, not only because of 
his achievements and success but be- 
cause he represents you, the coaches 
who represent so much in American 
life." 

Credits Tutors 
Big Jim, in accepting the award, said: 
"I thank you, and not just those who 
voted for me. In particular, I thank 
three coaches who had a lot to do with 
whatever success I've had. 

"First of all, to Carl Snavely who 
taught me how to play this game of 
football and the fundamentals that go 
with it. I also want to thank Don 
Faurot, who taught me the split-T. 

"And thanks go, too, to Bud Wilkin- 
son. He knocked me off this pedestal 
in a hurry. Now I'm right back on the 
field ready to start playing football 
again." 

Also on the television show were 
Missouri Coach Don Faurot, Sports- 
writer Joe Williams and Announcer 
Harry Wismer. 

Jim Tatum, coach of the only major 
undefeated and untied team in the 
nation over the regular 1953 season, 
has enjoyed his greatest success, per- 
sonal and otherwise, in his ninth sea- 
son as a head coach in collegiate foot- 
ball. 

Maryland also was top-ranked in 
the United Press coaches' poll, the 
INS national poll, and Big Jim was 
coach-of-the-year in the new Atlantic 
Coast Conference. As the outstanding 
team in the ACC, Maryland was a 
unanimous choice of the charter mem- 
bers to represent the Conference in the 
Orange Bowl against Oklahoma, where 
Maryland bowed to the Sooners, 7-0. 
Jim's Record 

Tatum came to Maryland seven years 
ago as the personal choice of Dr. Byrd. 
In those seven years the Terps have 
won 56 games, lost 11 and tied three. 
Maryland has had two undefeated 
teams, and this was the fourth bowl 
game, two 'Gator, a Sugar and an 
Orange. The year before he came to 
Maryland his Oklahoma team trounced 
N. C. State in the 'Gator Bowl. 

Tatum, on the sunny side of 40 
(Continued on Page 50) 



. xLl*. J: jm.j*L 



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HEAD COACH 

JAMES M. TATUM 

DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS^ 





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30 




By JOHNNY MARTIN 



Maryland Wins Ail-American 
City Tournament At Owensboro 




Defeats Kentucky Wesleya 
Arizona State and Evansvi 

Maryland 54; Kentucky Wesleyan 37 

aryland's, Bud Millikan- 
co a c I) e d basketball 
team, parlayed a tight, 
pressing defense and 
the deadly shooting of 
forward Gene Shue to 
beat Kentucky Wesley- 
an, 54-37, for the championship of the 
Ail-American City basketball tourna- 
ment, Owensboro, Kentucky. 

And once again it was Gene Shue 
leading the Terps in scoring. Shue 
(•Minted for 23 points while playing for 
three quarters. 

The Terps, coached by Millikan as 
one of the country's foremost expo- 
nents of the style of play which ac- 
cents defense and deliberate shooting, 
dominated play. 



BAKERY 



RESTAURANT 



AVIGNONE FRERES 



CATERER 



CONFECTIONS 



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Washington, 0. C. 



n In Finale After Beating 
lie. Terps Win 17 Games. 

Maryland's defense was so tight that 
the Panthers scored only one field goal 
in each of the second and third quart- 
ers. 

The Terps scored just after the open- 
ing tip and eased to a 17-10 lead at 
the quarter. By half time they led, 34- 
17, and were in front after three quar- 
ters, 45-24. 

Maryland 65; Arizona State 50 

In the quarter finals Maryland de- 
feated Arizona State of Tempe, 65-50. 
Gene Shue led Maryland with 25 points, 
while Bob Kessler chipped in with 19. 

Evansville, which opened its season 
with a 97-58 victory over Oakland City 
College, routed the University of Ten- 
nessee, 107-71, in the other quarter 
final. 

Tempe had an 18-12 lead after the 
first quarter, but Shue brought the 
Terps back to a 24-24 tie at halftime. 
The Terps pulled ahead in the second 
half and led, 44-32, after three quar- 
ters. 

Maryland 66; Evansville 58 

In the semi-finals two deadeye for- 
wards, Gene Shue and Tommy Young, 
shot Maryland into the finals, besting 
Evansville, 66-58. 

Shue and Young paced the Maryland 
team which shook off speedy and de- 
termined Hoosiers in the second half. 
Shue was the game's high scorer with 
20 points and Young got 16. 

Maryland 69; W & M 54 

Maryland's basketball team, after 
defeating South Carolina and Clemson 
and losing to Wake Forest, defeated 
William and Mary, 69-54. 

The Terps never lost the lead once 
they got ahead of William and Mary 
late in the second quarter. W. & M. 
took a 15-13 lead at the end of the 
first period, during which the lead 
changed hands eight times and dead- 
locked seven times. Gene Shue with 
27 points, Tom Young and Bob Evereet 
began finding the range with regularity 
in the third quarter, and the Terps 
pulled ahead. 

West Virginia 87; Maryland 71 
Maryland's basketball quintet failed 
to pick up steam as the Terps lost 




VOTED No. 1 

Maryland's tlenc Shue was voted the most 
valuable player in the All American City bas- 
ketball tournament wen by the Terps in 
Owensboro, A//.. over the holidays. 

With his 68 points against Arizona State. 
Kvansville, I ml., and Kentucky Wesleyan, 
Gene removed for Mary landers some of the 
stunt of th< Orange Bowl defeat at footbati. 

in tin Kiimi way he has captivated audi- 
ences in tin Atlantic Coast and Southern 

Con tin nil for I iro years. Shue iron over 

now ill-America boosters in basketbalUwisi 
Kentucky atid Indiana. 

The consensus among reporters was that 
the G-foot, 2-inch Terp senior with the <icii 
cute touch could hare scored 40 more points 
if he had wanted to. But he passed off, 
acted as n ih con ami was largely responsible 
for Maryland's huh/inn Kentucky Wish nan to 
eight field goals in tin final. Gene, himself, 
had 10 in that game. 

Coach lSiul Millikan, who developed Shue 
from n ci , uli unsung freshman rinkitdink into 
perhaps the finest player the school has ever 
hint, sniii : -His performance merely confirmed 
in a feeling that he is the greatest I have ever 
seen anywhere." 

Judging by mail anil newspaper reactions 
Conch Millikan is far from alone in that 
opinion. 

Last year Shue was selected hy sports 
writers as the most valuable player in tin 
Southern Conference tournament. He's het- 
ti r tli is year. 

\lso lust in or shue was named on Chuck 
Taylor's All-America ham and to the Helm's 
I niimlation A ll-Amcrica. 

Taylor, who picks his team for Converse 
Rubber Company, said : 

■•He's tin best all-around player I saw this 
Season. Iii addition to being a wonderful 
shot, he is a great dribbler. I've never seen 
n guy who left so many players stand flat- 
footed while he dribbles around them. He also 
plays well on defense." 

Everette Case. ?i.ortli Carolina State coach, 
rates Shue one of the greatest all around 
basketball performers he ever has si en , said; 

"ShuCs quickness with his- hands and ter- 
rific n in. res enabled him in be a leader on the 
Maryland defense, the second best in the na- 
tion last season." 

Hones Mch iitnt n . tin former Washington 
pro star, noir assistant cnach at Wake jur- 
ist, said, "If Sinn isn't All- America n. I've 
never seen, one." 

Shue's records already include his all time 

high individual scoring record of 508 points 

for '2'.', games, a record of 41 points scored 
against Washington ami I.ei last season, scor- 
ing 16 floor goals to break the old mark of 

14. Most points away from home against H it 

Ham anil Marii With 34, nml a record high nl 
"4% against William and Mary, hitting 15 
floor goals in Jl shots. He is the first 1). 0. 

area player to go above the 50 mark in one 

season, high Individual scorer in 17 Of last 
nine's 28 games imlniling :>0 January and 

Maryland's game against Tampa, eleven of 

flu top 20 scorers among H. O. area players 
had scored orcr 200 points ami one. Mary 
land's Cine Sliuc, cleared tin 300 mark. 



an 87-71 decision to the West Virginia 
Mountaineers. 

Coach Bud Millikan's five trailed 
their Southern Conference opponent 
at half time, 37-31. The Mountaineers 
increased their lead in the final two 



40 



"Maryland?' 



periods for the win. Maryland's Gene 
Shue garnered 12 points before foul- 
ing out early in the fourth quarter. 
Bob Everett copped scoring honors for 
the Old Liners with L5 points. 
Maryland 60; V.P.I. 52 

Maryland took an easy 60-52 victorj 
over V.P.I, with Gene Shue starring. 

Gene took only 17 shots all night, 
cashed 10 and added five of six from 
the charity line to wrap up a nice 
25-point performance. 

Shue made eight of his field goals 
in the first half on 11 shots. He slowed 
down in the second half, making only 
two of six, five of them attempts from 

the outside. 

Maryland 79; South Carolina 48 

Maryland, which, in the season's 
opener, had defeated South Carolina by 
only four digits, repeated against the 
Gamecocks to the melody of 79-48. 

The Millikanmen had a 16-13 lead at 
the end of the first quarter, but began 
to move away from the Gamecocks. The 
Terps went into the intermission with 
a wide 36-31 edge. 

Maryland widened the breach to 20 
points at the end of the third frame, 
55-35 and began scoring almost as it 
pleased. 

Gene Shue played a terrific floor 
game but left most of the scoring up 
to his colleagues. 

Bob Kessler led the parade with 16 
points, while Bob Everett contributed 
14, although he played less than three 
quarters. 

Maryland 72; Richmond 64 

Fresh from the victory at the Ail- 
American tournament in Owensboro, 
Ky., defeated Richmond 72-64, before 
an overflow crowd at Richmond. 

The Millikanmen started slowly and 
trailed 18-10, at the end of the first 
quarter, but built up a 32-30 halftime 
lead. 

Maryland threatened to make a rout 
of it in the third, 47-39, but the Spiders 
made a great bid in the fourth period 
and on four occasions pulled to within 
four points of the winners. 

The Terp attack was led by Gene 
Shue and Bob Everett. 

Maryland 70; Virginia 64 

Maryland defeated Virginia 70-64. 
Gene Shue was high man for Maryland 
with 20 points. 

The Terps managed to get behind 
just once, when Virginia connected 
with a jump shot after 28 seconds 
of the first period. From then on, 
the Terps had things their own way. 

At the finish the Millikanmen were 
winning as they pleased, generously 
using a wholesale batch of subs. 

Tom Young was second high scorer 
with 16 points. Young, Shue, and 
Ralph Greco hit hot streaks at various 
times. 

Maryland led, 16-13, at the end of 
the first period but soon cracked Vir- 
ginia for a 33-27 halftime advantage. 
Maryland's dominance of the back- 
boards showed up in a 51-41 third 
period lead and after five minutes of 
the last quarter the Terps were breez- 




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ing home — working on a 64-47 lead at 
that point. 

The game was the fifty-third of the 
series in which Maryland leads Vir- 
ginia, 39-14. 

Maryland 79; Clemson 54 

Gene Shue again was great against 
Clemson for 34 points as he led Mary- 
land to a 79-54 victory over the Tigers. 

Shue connected on 14 of 24 field goal 
attempts, all but two of which were 
sets from 15 or more feet away. 

The entire Terp team was hot. The 
squad, seven of whom scored, hit on 
•>'.> of fiT attempts. Bob Everett got 13, 
Ralph Greco 11, and Tom Young 10. 

Georgetown 58; Maryland 56 

Georgetown ended an eight game 
Maryland winning streak with a 58-56 
overtime upset at Georgetown. 

Georgetown scored five points in the 
first half of the five minute overtime. 

Trailing by five points with 35 sec- 
onds left to play, Maryland's Bill Mar- 
tin scored the Terps first field goal mid- 
way in the overtime and added a foul 
to make it 58-56, but the Terps couldn't 
gain possession again. 

In the first half the lead changed 
hands nine times and the score was 
tied on eight other occasions. The 
Hoyas led, 13-12 at the quarter. 

In the third Maryland never trailed 
although Don Morchower tied the game 
at 33-33 near the end of the quarter. 

Young was one of the main reasons 
Maryland never trailed in the fourth. 
He played an inspired game until he 
missed the two free throws which could 
have iced it for the Terps. 

Gene Shue was the game's high 
scorer with 20 points but he had his 
poorest day from the floor, hitting on 
only five of 24 shots. In the overtime 
Shue took five shots, missing all of 
them. 

Maryland has never beaten George- 
town in McDonough Gym. This was 
the third try. 

Richmond 73; Maryland 71 

Richmond defeated Maryland 73-71. 
The win was Richmond's eleventh in 
14 games. 

Gene Shue, Maryland's All-America 
basketball candidate, scored 23 points 
and was the game's high scorer. He 
hit on 10 of 18 field goal attempts for 
a 56 percent average. 

Maryland found the going difficult 
under the back boards and lost out on 
many scoring chances that went wide 
or were blocked. 

Richmond led throughout the sec- 
ond half until the last five minutes of 
the game when Shue tied it with a 
field goal. 

The score was tied at 23-23 as the 
first period ended, but Richmond held 
a 48-40 halftime lead. 

Maryland 68; G. Washington 61 

Maryland knocked George Washing- 
ton from the nation's unbeaten ranks 
68-61. 

G.W. went into the game a favor- 
ite on their record of having won 1 1 
straight and being voted the coun- 




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'•Maryland" 



try's seventh best team. However, the 
Colonials were never able to solve 
Maryland's game. 

Gene Shue was Maryland's big gun, 
accounting for 23 points, nearly all of 
them coming at key points in the game. 

Maryland actually won the game in 
the third period when the Terps out- 
scored G.W., 18-10, restricting CW. 
to only two field goals. Shue pushed 
in six of Maryland's 18 points in that 
quarter. 

Tom Young, who scored 14 points, 
and Bob Kessler, who got 15, joined 
Shue in the nifty defense which tied 
up (J.W. 

Maryland 70; Virginia 5ti 

Maryland outclassed the University 
of Virginia, 70 to 56, in an Atlantic 
Coast Conference basketball game. 

Bob Kessler poured in 15 points to 
lead the Terps to their thirteenth vic- 
tory. 

Gene Shue, Maryland's captain and 
consistent high scorer, sat on the 
bench with four personal fouls most of 
the second half and wound up with 14 
points, only two of which came in 
the last two quarters. 

Maryland's man-to-man defense was 
so effective that Virginia was limited 
to only 15 field goals. The Cavaliers 
scored just two times from the floor 
in the second period and after that 
failed to collect another field goal un- 
til 6.53 of the third quarter. 

Maryland led, 37 to 24, at the half. 
The Terps, controlling the backboards, 
maintained a comfortable margin the 
rest of the way. 

Maryland 61; Tampa 51 

Maryland, behind one point at half- 
time, came on strong in the final two 
periods to defeat Tampa 61-51. 

Gene Shue, as usual, set the pace for 
the Terps with 27 points, 17 of them in 
the last half. 

The best all-around performer was 
Bob Kessler, Maryland guard, who di- 
rected the Maryland attack, played a 
fine game on defense and found time to 
score 18 points. 

Maryland 63; Miami 57 

Maryland surged from behind to 
win from Miami, 63-57, scoring 13 
points in a fourth quarter garrison 
finish, while shutting out Miami. 

On the short side of a 47-42 score 
as the final period began and behind 
51-50 with six minutes remaining, the 
Terrapins got together for a come- 
back that saw all five players contrib- 
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Maryland's Tom Young, with the 
golden left hand, and Gene Shue, with 
play-making know-how, were the chief 
difference. They each scored 17 points. 

It was a see-saw battle in which the 
lead changed hands seven times. 

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Maryland 51; W. & L. 25 

Maryland defeated Washington and 
Lee, 51-25, allowing the smallest num- 
ber of points Maryland has given up 
since Millikan became coach in 1950. 

Gene Shue and Tom Young busted it 
wide open with four quick baskets in 
the first quarter. Shue scored only 
12 points but enough to make him high 
man. 

This tied Maryland's 1928 and 1931 
records of 16 wins. 

Maryland 56; V.P.L 41 
The Terps next set an all-time school 
record for most victories in one sea- 
son, 17, by trimming Virginia Tech, 
56-41. The old record for Maryland 
was 16 wins and 6 losses in 1929 and 
16 wins while losing four in 1931. 

The Terps played their usual posses- 
sion-type game and led 27-13 at the 
half, but VPI came on strong and 
threatened in the second half. 

Gene Shue and Bob Everett were the 
big scorers with 14 and 13 respective- 

ly. 



BOXING 



Syracuse 4'/ 2 ; Maryland 3'/z 

aryland's ring opener 
was marred by that 
bug-a-boo of collegiate 
boxing, debatable of- 
ficiating. Syracuse won 
4% to 3%, after which 
Syracuse coach Roy 
Simmons opined, "I would have been 
happy to settle for a draw." 

The boy who took the really bad 
break for Coach Frank Cronin's squad 
was Ronnie Rhodes, Maryland's 175 
pounder. He clearly outboxed Syra- 
cuse's Vince Rigolosi for two rounds, 
both of which, however, came up for 
Syracuse. In the third Rigolosi had 
a clear edge but the round was marred 
by a knockdown count against Rhodes 
when he slipped to the canvas. Rhodes 
displayed "inside" boxing and blocking 
ability seldom seen in a college ring 
and the decision against him drew a 
record crop of boos. 

At 125 Maryland's Gary Garber took 
the nod over game and willing Frank 
Guelli, Syracuse. 

At 132 Maryland's Guido Capri fought 
on even-Stephen terms with Gerry 
Jaffee. It came up for the Orangemen. 

At 139 Maryland's Art Hintze ap- 
peared to have the edge over Art 
Nelson, classy Syracuse boxer. It 
came up even. 

John Granger, 147 pound Syracuse 
star, stopped Maryland's Hob Theofield 
in round one. 

At 156 Larry O'Sullivan, Syracuse, 
outboxed Maryland's Royd Smith. 




Bill Mclnnis, Terp 165 pounder, 
showed polish, power and correct 
punching technique in stopping John 
Pauldine in round one. 

Leo Coyne, Maryland heavyweight 
port sider, outboxed Harvey Healey 
all the way. Coyne looked like a real 
comer. When he learns that a south- 
paw is no better than his right hand 
he will be a tough guy to lather. This 
time out Leo didn't use his right hand 
a dime's worth. 

Vince Bradford was referee. No 

judges. 

Maryland 6; Penn State 2 

The bright red badge of courage 
made one of its most brilliant appear- 
ances in Maryland's 6 to 2 win over 
Coach Ed Sulkowski's Penn State fis- 
ticians, when, in the 175 class, Terp 
Ronnie Rhodes crawled up off of the 
deck twice to hold Adam Kois even. 

Kois, national runner-up, never off 
of his feet in any bout and probably 
the best lightheavy in collegiate ranks, 
dropped Rhodes flat on his face in 
round one. As the Texas youngster 
wobbled to his feet Kois most convinc- 
ingly flattened him again. Again 
Rhodes, a heart as big as the Alamc, 
staggered up and weathered the storm. 
In the second Kois came out to finish 
the job but Rhodes nailed him with a 
right that dropped Kois flat. Just be- 
fore the bell Rhodes again dropped 
Kois cold with a left hook. It would 
have been a kayo win but the bell in- 
tervened. The last round was a tit-tat- 
toe of terrific punching. It was called 
a di-aw. 

A sensational, hard punching bout 
resulted when Vincent Palumbo, 132, 
made his debut for Maryland to win 
from ex-Marine Harry Papacharalamb- 
ous. Each scored smashing knowdowns. 

At 139 little Guido Capri appeared 
to have the edge of State's Don Mar- 
tin. It was called a draw. 

Bob Theofield, at 147, lost the de- 
cision to Jack Stokes, Penn State. Bob 
came along like a winner in the last 
round but started too late. 

At 156 Royd Smith won from Allen 
DeMay, State, in a hard fought, fairly 
even match. 

Bill Mclnnis, 165, greatly improved 
boxer, won handsomely over game Dick 
Ahem, State. 

Leo Coyne, Terp heavy, better with 
every start, won from Frank Delia, 
Penn State. 

At 125 Gary Garber won by default. 
Billy Williams, Virginia, was referee. 
No judges. 



USE THE COUPON ON LAST PAGE 



44 



"Maryland" 



Th€ 
tional 



Col. 



Intramural Trophy 

University announced an addi- 
boxing trophy to be awarded 
annually, to the fra- 
ternity team winning 
the inter-fraternity 
boxing tournament. 

Named the Miller 
Trophy in honor of 
Colonel Harvey L. 
Miller, USMC (Ret.), 
former Maryland box- 
inji coach, the trophy 
i.s sponsored by former 
Maryland boxers, Maj- 
ors Benny and Hotsy 
Alperstein and coach 
inner Frank Cronin. 




Colonel Miller coached Terp ring 
teams from 1!»3(; to 1940 and from 1946 
to 1951, winning Southern Conference 
titles in 1937, 1939, and 1947. He was 
on active duty in the Marine Corps 
from 1940 to 1946. He has been active- 
ly connected with boxing in one way 
oi another each year since 1900. 

The new trophy was won this year 
by Delta Sigma Phi and was presented 
on February 6 at the Penn State- 
Maryland dual meet. 

Some of Maryland's very best inter- 
collegiate boxers were products of 
intra-campus competition, lacing on 
their first pair of gloves after matricu- 
lation at Maryland. Included in this 
category are Frank Cronin, Newton 
Cox, Hotsy Alperstein, Eddie Rieder, 
and Jackie Letzer. 



WRESTLING 



W. Virginia 19; Maryland 10 

aryland's wrestlers 
dropped six matches in 
, a row for a 17-0 lead 
before Coach Sully 
Krause's lads regis- 
tered a win in the mat 
opener against West 
Virginia, won by the Mountaineers. 
The Fischer brothers, Bob and Ernie, 
and Carl Everley were the only point 
getters for Maryland. 

123 lbs. — Bob Perry (W. Va.) pinned 
Prank Alfaro (Md.) (1 :04 third period). 

130 lbs. — Lewis Guidi (W. Va.) outpointed 
Rooney Carroll (Md.) (5-1). 

137 lbs. — Bill Pritchanl (W. Va.) out- 
pointed Dan Little (Md.) (4-2).' 

147 lbs. — Neal Travis (W. Va.) referee's 
(Incision over Don Hartnett (Md.) (2-2 at 
end of third period). 

157 lbs. — Bryee Kramer (W. Va.) out- 
pointed Jack Lessig (Md.) (7-1). 

167 lbs. — Bob Fischer (Md.) outpointed 
Prank Graze (W. Va.) (11-1). 

177 lbs. — Ernie Fischer (Md.) pinned Joe 
Kaminsky (W. Va.) (44 seconds of first 
period). 

HYW — Carl Everley (Md.) drew (3-3) 
John Buchanan (W. Va.). 

Maryland 18; Virginia 13 
Maryland's grapplers whipped Vir- 
ginia, 18 to 13. 

Pins by Robert Fischer and Bob Drake 
in the 167-pound and 177-pound weight 
classes put the Krouse-Krushers in 
front after they had trailed in the first 
five matches. Virginia lost its last 




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45 



chance to win when Bernard Schwab 
could do no better than a draw with 
.Maryland's Carl Kverley in the heav\ 

division. 

U7 Pounds Colin Steele, Virginia, pinned 
Prank Alfaro, 7.30. 

130 Pounds Rodnej Carroll, Maryland, de- 
rislonetl Charles Xoung, 8 — 3. 

: Pounds Dan Little, Maryland, <!<■• 
clsloned Charles Merrlman, (> — 3. 

147 Pounds Fred Bocock, Virginia, de 
led Don Hartnel t, 5 — 4. 

157 Pounds Lee Marston, Virginia, de- 
rlsloned Hill Kern, 7 — 6. 

IliT Pounds — Koliert Fischer, Maryland 
pinned Kenneth Peebles, 1.24, 

177 Pounds Bob Drake, Maryland, pinned 
John HJorth, 3.25. 

Ilea vy weight Bernard Schwab, Virginia, 
uuil i !ar] Bverley, drew, 2 

Maryland 25; Duke 3 

Coach Sully Krouse's grapplers took 
a 25-3 decision over Duke in an Atlan- 
tic Coast Conference dual meet. 

With Rodney Norris, Ernie Fischer, 
and Bob Drier out of the lineup the 
Terps second line of attack won easily. 
Bob Fischer won by forfeit. 

The summary: 



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123 — Frank Alfaro, Maryland, outpointed 
Itoth. -4 2. 

130— Rodney Carroll, Marland, outpointed 
Trlmperd, 4-0. 

137 — Dan Little, Maryland, outpointed 
Landau, 4-0. 

147 — Dun Uartnett, Maryland, pinned 
Wrlick, 3:20. 

157 — Chad wick, Duke. outpointed Bob 
Kcin. 5-1. 

167 — Robert Fischer, Maryland, won by 
forfeit, 

177 — Bob Drake, Maryland, outpointed E. 
Kim hcjian, 4-0. 

Heavyweight — Carl Everley, Maryland, out- 
pointed M. Konieiek, 7-2. 

Maryland 6; Navy 22 

Maryland's wrestling contingent suf- 
fered a 22-6 defeat by the Navy squad. 

Maryland's Fischer brothers, Bob 
and Ernie, scored Maryland's only 
points in decisioning a Navy brother 
team of Phil and John Brainerd. Pete 
Blair and Joe Gattuso scored the only 
two falls in the meet for Navy. 

The summary: 

123— Bill Holt/., Navy, outpointed Frank 
All'ara, 10-2. 

130— -Art .lesser, Navy, outpointed Rod- 
nc.v Carroll, 1-0. 

137 — Herhv Crane. Navy, outpointed Dan 
Little, 7-4. 

147 — Larry Marr, Navy, outpointed Vincent 
Harnett, 7-0. 

157 — Robert Fischer, Maryland, outpointed 
1'. Brainerd. 5-3. 

lt>7 — Ernie Fischer, Maryland, outpointed 
.1. Brainerd, 8-3. 

177 — Joe Gattuso, Navy, pinned Bob Drake, 
7 :3S. 

Heavyweight — Pete Blair, Navy, pinned 
Carl Everly, 4:19. 

Maryland 20; W & L 6 

Maryland's Fischer brothers — Ernie 
and Bob — each won as usual as the 
Terps defeated Washington & Lee, 
20-6. 

Ernie pinned Trev Armbrister in 
3:48 in the 177-pound match, while Bob 
defeated previously unbeaten Gib Mc- 
Sipadden, 3-0, in the 167-pound bout. 

SUMMARIES 
123-pound : Alfaro (Md.) won over Bender 
(W&L). 41: 130 pound: Ellis (W&L) won 
over Carroll (Md.), 5-2; 137-pound: Little 
(Md.), won over Kaplan (W&L). 9-1; 147- 
pound: Hartnett (Md.), won over Sites 
I W&L), 4-3; 157-pound: Northrop (W&L), 
won over Lessig (Md.), 6-0: 167-pound: E. 
Fischer (Md.), pinned Armbrister (W&L), in 
3:48; heavyweight: Everley (Md.), won over 
Km ub (W&L), 4-0. 

Wins at Norfolk 

Maryland's Robert Fischer won in 
the 167-pound class in Norfolk's Junior 
Chamber of Commerce International 
Wrestling Tournament when he pinned 
Bill Berry of VMI in 58 seconds of 
the second period. Fischer is an AAU 
champion. 



TRACK 



Terps Tops At V.M.I. 

aryland trackmen won 
six varsity and one 
freshman event to dom- 
inate the Virginia Mili- 
tary Institute Relays. 

Mel Schwarz, Terp 
pole vaulter, shattered 
the VMI record when he cleared the 
bar at 13 feet, 3% inches which also 
bettered the existing outdoor Southern 
Conference record which is 18 feet, 




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"Maryland' 



3 inches. He missed a mark of 13 feet, 
8*/6 inches when his chest grazed the 
bar. 

The Terps won the shuttle hurdle, 
the half-mile, the mile, two-mile and 
the four-mile relays, the freshman 
three-quarter mile run and the pole 
vault. 

Schwarz was voted the outstanding 
man in the field events. 

Alva "Burr" Grimm of Maryland 
won the freshman race in 3:18.2. Mary- 
land runners also placed second and 
third. 

SPRINT SHUTTTiE 1. VMI (Mapp, Hop 
kins. Wilson. Decker); 2, Maryland; :!, Vir- 
ginia : 4, Duke. Time :26.1. 

SHUTTLE HURDLE— 1. Maryland (Rn 
kow. Ruharh. Sigworth, Gaddv) ; 2. VMI ; ;;. 
Duke : 4, VPI. Time — :.-?2.r>. 

SSO RELAYS — 1, Maryland (Wilson. Hem- 
ler. Stroup, Pentzer) ; 2, VMI ; .'?, VIM ; 4, 
Roanoke College. Time — 1 :.'!.">. 2. (New record 
— old record 1 :.".t; tiol.l by Mnrvlnnd in 1953). 

MILE RELAY— 1, Maryland (Pentzer, 
Hemler, Wilson. Stroup); 2, VPI; 3, Duke; 
4. VMI. Time — 3 :33.3. 

TWO MILE RKI.AY 1. Maryland (Oood, 
Wagner. Hower. Paas) ; 2, VMI ; 3, Duke. 
Time — 8:30.7. 

DISTANCE MEDLEY— 1. VMI (Shay, lliir 
genbotham, Robertson, Angle) : 2. North Car- 
olina : .", .VPI : 4. William and Mary. Time — 
11 :l«.7. (New record — old record set by N. C. 
Stale in l!tr,:;. time 11 :11.4). 

MASON DIXON CONFERENCE DIS- 
TANCE MEDLEY — 1. Roanoke College (Sum- 
mers. Liftman. Irvin. Noel); 2. Catholic 
University: :;. Towson Teachers; 4. Bridge 
water. Time — 11:23.2. (New record — old rec- 
ord held by Catholic P. set last vear in 
11 :24.0). 

FRESHMAN MILE RELAY— VPI (Wlng- 
tield. Drew. Anselmo. Minor) : 2, Maryland ; 
3, VMI : 4. Virginia. Time — :i :40.1. 

SHOT PUT — Lawsche, Duke: 2. Dyson, 
Maryland: 3, Carter. VMI; 4. Miller, VMI. 
Distance — r>l feet. •", Inches (new record — 
Lawsch held old mark of 48 feet, 10 inches 
set in 1 !>.->3). 

HIGH JUMP — Lankford, VPI; 2. Hall. 
VPI : 8, (tie) Keintz. Richmond and S'hankle. 
Duke. Height — feet, 2 inches. (Ties record 
Lankford set in 1952 of 6 feet. 2 inches i 

FRESHMAN THREE QUARTER MILE 
RUN — 1, Grimm, Maryland : 2, Parly. Mary- 
land : 3, New. Maryland : 4. Peters. Duke. 
Time — 3:18.2. 

FOUR-MILE RELAY— 1. Maryland (Mc- 
Gee. Goldstein. Good, Funs) ; 2, Roanoke Col- 
lege: :i, VMI : 4. VPI. Time — 19:05.2 (new 
record — Maryland set the former mark in 
1953 in 19 :15.2). 

SPRINT MEDLEY— 1. VMI (Shay. Svend- 
sen, Mapp, Angle) : 2. Maryland ; 3, Catho- 
lic University : 4. North Carolina. Time — 
3 :46.0. 

POLE VAULT — 1, Schwarz. Maryland: 2, 
(tie) Shankle. Duke: Brasfield, Virginia; 
Diggs. Washington & Lee : Duke. North Caro- 
lina : Ynrbrough. North Carolina. Distance — 
13 feet. 4% inches (new field house record — 
old mark 12 feet, 3 inches, bv Butler in 
1953). 



SOCCER 



aryland's Atlantic Coast 
soccer championship 
team placed five men 
on the All-ACC team. 
Duke placed seven; NC 
State five. The team: 

Goal— CARROLL REYNOLDS, MD. ; Tom 
McGinley. Virginia. 

Right Fullback — Jake Tarr, Duke : Maurice 
Chocrom, N. C. State. 

Left Fullback— TOM P.ADEN, MD. j Hector 
Rinuezes, Duke. 

Right Half— Chuck Iiazemore, Duke ; Chip 
Bryant, UNC. 

Left Halfback — Wayne Cunningham, Duke ; 
Harry Pawlik. UNC. 

Center Halfback — Fred James, Duke ; 
Carlos Aqurreurreta, N. C. State. 

Inside Left— OTTO WINCKELMANN. MD. ; 
Norman Morris, N. C. State. 

Outside Left— HECTOR SALINAS, MD. ; 
James Trusloew, N. C. State. 

Center Forward— JOSE HAGEDORN, MD. ; 
Adrian Castro, N. C. State. 

Inside Right— Joy p u yi, Dpke; Bob Sad- 
ler, Virginia, 




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A kitchen cynic advises that when 
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ally waived it is with a good end in 
view — or a fullback. 



* * * 

How about the fellow who wants the 
subject "gross anatomy" brightened up 
with occasional field trips. 

* * * 

Two Indians fishing. No speak. One 
hauls up a mermaind and mutters, 

"Why?" The other says, "How?" 

* * * 

Coed held up and robbed. She was 
taking home her Auntie's, pay check. 
She screamed, "There goes my Aunt's 
pay." Said a policeman, "We want the 
tacts. Ditch the hog latin." 

The Flying Carrolls, trapeze act, 
man and wife. Worked together for 
years. He caught her in the act many, 

many times. 

* * * 

Hollywood excitement: "George, your 
kids and my kids are beating up our 

kids." 

* * * 

Barber: "I don't remember your 
face." 

Customer: "It's all healed by now." 

* * * 

Cop: "Lady, this is a safety zone." 
Lady: "I know. That's why I drove 

in here." 

* * * 

Lumna: "It's disgusting the way 
those men stare at the girl getting on 
the bus." 

Lumnus: "What bus?" 

* * * 

"What model is your car?" 

"No model. Just a horrible example." 

* * * 

Prof. Hingesetzt: "That girl drives 
me nuts with her constant chatter." 

Prof. Purzelbaum: "According to the 
Constitution of the United States, she 
has a right to talk." 

Prof. Hingesetzt: "The United 
States has a Constitution that can 
stand it. Mine can't." 

* * * 

Yank : " When I was young I was left 
an orphan." 

llriton: "And whatever did you do 

with him?" 

* * * 

Golfer: "You're the world's worst 
caddy." 

Caddy: "That IS a coincidence!" 

* * * 

\\ inh r: "Your husband just slid un- 
der the table." 

She: "My husband just came in the 
door. The guy under the table saw 

III in tirst." 

* * * 

Mama: "Eat the spinach, dear. You'll 

like it. Pretend it's mud." 

* * * 



Old Moll: "Years ago you asked me 
to marry you." 

Absent-minded Prof: "And did I?" 

* * * 

Feller and his wife had a fight. He 
enjoyed it and when she threw a 
hatchet at him he thought he'd split. 

* * * 

Mrs. — "That's a devoted couple. He 
kisses her every time they meet. Why 
don't you do that?" 

Mr. — "I don't know her well enough 
yet." 

* * * 

Judge: "Thirty years penal servi- 
tude." 

70 Year Old Crook: "I shall not live 
long enough to serve that long." 

Judge: "Well, Pop, just do the best 
you can." 

* * * 

Mama Bacigalupi: "I would like-a 
make-a da loan." 
Bank Guy: "See the loan arranger." 
Mrs. B.: "You mean like-a Hi-Ho 

Silver?" 

* * * 

Bess: "I neither smoke, drink nor 
neck." 

Buzz: "What do you do?" 
Bess: "I just tell lies." 

* * * 

Janie:"Mummy, may I go swim- 
ming ?" 

Mother: "No, dear, it's too deep." 
Janie: "Daddy's in." 
Mother: "He's insured." 

* * *. 

Golfer: "Why do you look at your 
watch so often?" 

Caddy: "This is a compass." 

* * * 

Ye King: "You are accused of mis- 
behavior?" 

Ye Galahad: "Sire! In what manor?" 

* * * 

"How did John register at the first 
hotel you stopped at?" the honeymoon 
bride was asked. 

"Oh, just fine," she replied. 

* * * 

The little old lady wanted to buy a 
stove. The hotshot salesman told her 
about noncorroding bolts and patented 
insulation and the thick gauge of the 
mi tal and about tricky gadgets and 
combustion chambers. When the sales- 
man stopped to get his breath she asked 
"Will it keep two old ladies warm?" 

* * * 

Long winded speaker. 
Listener I : — "What follows this 
speaker?" 
Listener II: — "Wednesday." 

* * * 

Safety sign: "School — Don't Kill a 
Child." Beneath A childish scrawl add- 
ed: "Wait for a Teacher." 

* * * 



43 



"Maryland" 



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Th< press, at Hi, Orange Bowl game 
mentioned that when ih, Oklahoma 
band played "Oklahoma," from the 
play of ihui name, ii marked » i 
tribution from the state to th\ world 
of ni/isir. \o mi, mentioned thai when 
the combined bands sent the tingles 
n ii tin K/iiiti x with "Tin Star-Spangled 
Banner" it marked a contribution by 
a Marylander ui Fori McHenry to thi 

whole world. 

* * * 

Heard at Jim Magner's. Mote thai 

nice letter to Jim Tatum from the 
mother of Larry Grigg, the Oklahoma 
hoy who scored that 'I'D against t he 
Terps? Note also that he wants to 
play for the Baltimore Colls. Betcha 
his Maw sold him on Maryland people." 

* * * 

Essay on Educational Advantages 
Offl red hi/ our Stiih from the pen of 

a high school student, "Among the must 
advanced agricultural education in the 

State is the fact that at the I ' n irersity 
of Manila nd, cattle arc propagated 
without a bull in sifiht. It is called 
"artificial inspiration." 

Doctor's boy: "My father makes 
money fast. Goes to the hospital, op- 
erates and gets $500." 

Lawyer's boy: "My father goes to 
court, talks for about a day and he 
charges $1,000." 

Preacher's boy: "My dad does noth- 
ing all week, talks twenty minutes on 
Sunday and it takes four guys to 
bring the dough to him." 

* * * 

Farmer's wife to druggist: "Be sure 
to write plain on them bottles which is 
for the horse and which is for my hus- 
band. I don't want nothin' to happen 
before spring plowin'." 

* * * 

Odd names: Navy feller, Justin Re- 
pose. Dentist: Grinnan Barrett. 

* * * 

Believing she recognized her hus- 
band, a lady on a Greyhound bus 
tapped a gent in the seat ahead. When 
the man turned she saw a perfect 
stranger. 

"Oh, pardon me," she stammered, 
"but your head looks exactly like my 
husband's, behind." 



FOOTBALL, 1954 

Maryland's elected national inter- 
collegiate football champions of 1953 
will open their 1954 schedule the hard 
way. 

The ten-game schedule opens at Ken- 
tucky on September 18 and then after 
a week off sends Maryland out to Los 
Angeles for a Friday night game, 
October 1, with U.C.L.A. 

The Terps' first home game is carded 
for October 16th, against North Caro- 
lina. 

Maryland's last four games are at 
home with North Carolina State, Clem- 
son, George Washington and Missouri. 

Kentucky, U.C.L.A., North Carolina 
State, and Wake Forest are 1954 re- 
placements for Washington and Lee, 



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Georgia, Mississippi, and Alabama of 
last season. 







Schedule 


Sept. 


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Kentucky 


Oct. 


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D.C.L.A. (night) 




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Wake Forest 


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North Carolina 




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North Carolina BtaU 


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Clemaon 


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George Washington 


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27 


Missouri 



'Home games at College Park. 



"Maryland" 



49 




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GRADUATE MANAGER OF ATHLETICS 

Bill Cobey, pictured above, is Jim Tatum's right hand administrative executive. 



TATUM, COACH OF YEAR 

(Continued from Page 33) 
years of age, has not known a losing 
regular season in his year at North 
Carolina, a season at Oklahoma and 
seven at Maryland. His over-all rec- 
ord is 69-16-5, not counting nine vic- 
tories and two defeats when he was 
head coach at Jacksonville Naval Air 
Station during the war. 

A former tackle at the University 
of North Carolina, Jim probably is 
the most defense-minded coach in 
America. His current team topped the 
country in rushing defense. To Tatum, 
Maryland is known as the only team 
that scored six shutouts this year. 
Only 31 points were scored against 
them in six games. 

But despite this accent on defense 
his split-T offense is the best. Before 
the season Jim and an assistant, War- 
ren Giese, contributed "Coaching Foot- 
ball and the Split-T" to the football 
book shelf. He spends almost every 
available off-season moment lecturing 
on his split-T offense. Yet his per- 
sonal pride is his team's defensive rec- 
ord. 

Tatum's fans also point out that an- 



other nice habit of the big fellow is 
that his teams for the most part have 
won their most important games. 

While a Tatum team lost in the 
Orange Bowl, 7-0 to Oklahoma, Tatum 
Bowl teams won from Tennessee in 
the Sugar Bowl, Missouri in the 'Gator 
Bowl and tied with Georgia in the 
'Gator Bowl. 

The three Navy games were the big 
ones on Maryland's schedule for three 
years and all were in Maryland's favor. 
Maryland was the last team to defeat 
Michigan State until Purdue startled 
the Spartans in the 1953 season. The 
1953 Mississippi game was a mighty 
important one to Maryland. Ole Miss 
had upended the Terps' 19-game win- 
ning streak in 1952 and was headed 
for the Southeastern Conference title. 

Backing Tatum's coaching successes 
is his greatest asset — the ability to 
organize. Dr. Byrd, himself a great 
football coach, terms Tatum the great- 
est organizer he has met. Tatum's 
coaching staff, his coaching system, his 
planning for practice, his preparation 
for games are part of his close-knit 
organization. His day in the football 
season starts at 6:30 a.m. It is over 



50 



"Maryland" 



after midnight. A big fellow, he has 
the drive to cany through a season on 
this schedule. 

All-Americans, pro prospects and 
members of all-star teams virtually 
were unheard of at Maryland before 
the Tatum regime. Last year nine of 
the Terps were drafted by pro teams 
and five were on the College All-Star 
squad, another high. Maryland lia.s 
placed two players on most of the 
respected All-Americas for four years. 

Tatum is a favorite of the football 
writers, radio and TV men, who find 
him available and co-operative. 

From South Carolina 

Jim, who went through grammar 
school and high school in McColl, S. C, 
as the biggest boy in his class by quite 
a few pounds and several inches, has 
a youngster, Jimmy, who is the big- 
gest youngster in the first grade of 
College Park Elementary. The Ta- 
tum's, (Mrs. Tatum is from Ayden, 
N. C.) also have a daughter, Becky, 
in the third grade and a year old 
daughter, Reid. 




"Sorry, sir, hut Dean Versteckt is out to 
lunch." 



ORANGE BOWL 

(Continued from Page 8) 

"If Maryland played a worse game 
this season it must have been some- 
where in secret." 

"In answer to a hundred question," 
wrote Francis Stann in the Washing- 
ton Star, "Yes, Maryland would have 
won with Faloney fit, probably by 14 
to 0. Maryland undoubtedly would 
have scored in the first quarter when 
it was first down on the Oklahoma 4, 
go to go." 

Missed Faloney 

"Faloney made the big difference — 
no matter what the experts say . . . 
Charley Boxold did a courageous job 
under the circumstances but the pres- 
sure was on the rest of the Terps, 
too," wrote Bob Addie in the Washing- 
ton Times-Herald. 

"Imagine Maryland not scoring from 
first down inside the five with Faloney 



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51 



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"JUST BEFORE THE BATTLE, MOTHER" 

Down among the sheltering palms a group oj Terrapin Club members, including alumni and 
faculty, flash prc-game smiles before the Orange Bowl's Maryland-Oklahoma game. 



in there, or after a first down inside 
the 10," said Merrell Whittlesey, of 
the Star, adding, "It was a good, bal- 
anced team beating a shell of the team 
that was awarded the national title." 

Another Whittlesey comment went 
like so: "The anti-Marylanders — there 
are many in Washington, and appar- 
ently millions in the Midwest — looked 
for Maryland to have excuses. By golly, 
the Terps had!" 

"It would be ridiculous and unfair 
to say that the Maryland football team 
on the field at Miami was the same one 
that romped through the season with 
10 straight victories, won the O'Don- 
nell Trophy as the top team in the As- 
sociated Press poll and vaulted Tatum 
into the coach-of-the-year throne," Mr. 
Whittlesey continued. 

"No football player in the country — 
Lattner, Roberts, Cameron, Bratkow- 
ski, Yewcic, Caroline, Giel or any of 
the other great ones — meant to his 
team what Faloney did to the Terps," 
Whittlesey concluded. 

The Game 

Mil. Okla. 

First downs 13 10 

Hushing yardage 17G 208 

Passing yardage 36 22 

1'nsses attempted 12 6 

Passes completed 5 4 

Passes intercepted by 

Punts 5 7 

Panting average 29 31.3 

Kuinldcs lost 1 2 

Yards penalized 15 45 

Those are the statistics. However, 
nothing counts but the score board. As 
Teddy Roosevelt coined, "Only the 
shots that hit, count!" So there is 
no desire to dim one iota of the lustre 
on the winning shield of Oklahoma. 
Our guys, top guys too, simply lost a 
ball game. 



In football as it was played by Mary- 
land and Oklahoma, the team that 
scores first can dictate the opposition's 
play. For the first time in 1953 Mary- 
land was behind and wound up shut 
out for the first time since Vanderbilt 
in 1948. 

The Faloneyless Terps lacked the 
speed, dash and power, the elan and 
esprit of the '53 regular season. Charlie 
Boxold made a big league try to fill an 
All-American pair of shoes. He was 
not quite big enough. 

Twice Boxold called the Terps with- 
in the very shadows of the Sooner's 
goal line but couldn't get the ball onto 
pay dirt. 

Larry Grigg, Star 

The big star of the game was Okla- 
homa's Larry Grigg, who not only 
scored the game's lone touchdown but 
intercepted a Terp pass in the end 
zone and recovered a Maryland fumble. 

Grigg ran 25 yards behind great 
blocking to get the score that climaxed 
an 80-yard drive with five minutes gone 
in the second quarter. 

When Buddy Leake place-kicked the 
extra point, the scoring was over. 

Oklahoma beat Maryland at its own 
game on the ground. They beat Mary- 
land, too, at its favorite game of goal 
line defenses. And they outpassed 
Maryland, the passing team. 

Oklahoma played its seven-point 
lead safely. They threw six times in the 
first half and completed four, but they 
attempted no passes in the second. 

Oklahoma had more bounce than the 
Terps, who appeared more listless. 
When Maryland had first down on 



52 



"Maryland" 



the four-yard line early in the first 
quarter, Hanulak, Nolan, Boxold and 
Felton all had a crack at the goal line, 
and, in four downs, were a foot short, 

When the Terpa came back after 
Jack Bowersox recovered a fumble, 
l'delski and Nolan made a first down 
on the nine as the quarter ended. 

Three plays netted 2 yards and Fel- 
ton missed the field goal. 

Earlier Bielski had tried a field goal 
from the 43 and it wasn't even close. 
Felton's was off to the left. 

Nolan was Maryland's offensive star, 
despite being hit so hard that he had 
to leave the game. Nolan took two 
passes for 31 yards, carried 12 times 
for 45 yards and was more than ade- 
quate defensively. He gave it all he 
had. 

"Boxold didn't fumble and had only 
one pass intercetped. "He's a brilliant 
boy and will be a great quarterback 
next year," Tatum said. 

Terrapin Club En Masse 

The Terrapin Club, Maryland's 
booster organization, boasted that 304 
of its 310 members were present. . . . 
The rooters included R. Sumter Grif- 
fith of Waynesboro, Va., Maryland's 
oldest graduate. 

It was not a thrilling game. Rather 
it was like two good counter punch- 
ing K.O. boxers, each respecting the 
other. 70,000 people on a beautiful 
Florida day with, however, not much 
cheering. 

One of the many lessons taught by 
athletics is to "walk humble." Athletic 
glory is a fleeting thing, as Shirley 
Povich pointed out in the Washington 
Post. 

"What happened to Maryland is 
another reminder of the shift of things 
in this changing world. Two years 
ago to the day, it was a Maryland 
team knocking off the champ, Tennes- 
see, in the Sugar Bowl. Two years 
later, Maryland has a fine understand- 
ing of Tennessee's feelings in that kind 
of a matter." 

Only a handful of the faithful met 
the returning Terps at the airport. It 
was not like the return from the Sugar 
Bowl two years ago or, three years 
ago, the return from Michigan State. 
Athletics are swell — when you win! 
Speed on the field is peanuts compared 
to the speed with which fans forget 
a loser. When you climb up the lad- 
der you're a better target for those 
underneath. When you're in front 
you're in position to be kicked from 
behind. Since sports are rated as 
part of the student's education our 
1953 Terps learned something by the 
Orange Bowl loss. In these pages 
they're still our Terps and still our 
coaches; the same outfit that, by the 
votes of coaches and press experts, 
won the nation's number 1 honors. 
Human Interest 

Human interest? Francis Stann, in 
the Washington Star had it, viz: — 

Jim Tatum walked glumly out of 
the hot Maryland dressing room and 
climbed into the front seat of a police 
car that was to lead the team buses 
back to the hotel. He spied Warren 



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53 



,< in's assistants, and 
' him along. As the police 

ear, Tatum said, 
"Wait a minute, sergeant." 

Jim jumped out of the car and 
grabbed up a small boy who iras 
boarding one of tin buses. It teas his 
ar-old son Jimmy. The boy looked 
■I and unhappy. 
"Hello, Jimmy," said the polio 
•'Hello," mumbled the little Tatum. 
"You'n not doing to cry, are you, 
Jimmy." asked big Tatum. 

"I guess vot, but," Jimmy said in a 
low voice, "why didn't we sneak for a 
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"We tried a sneak, Jimmy," Tatum 
said. Charlie Boxold sneaked. He 
just didn't make it." 

The other passengers were quite, 
content to let Tatum set the mood. 
If he wanted to talk, he would talk. 
And in spurts . . . 
ivhen the wail of 
the siren would die 
down . . . he re- 
played parts of 
Oklahoma's 7-0 up- 
set over his Terra- 
pins. 

"Warren," he 
ask< d, "did I make 
a mistake when I 
put in the No. 2 
team when we 
were down near 
their goal line in 
the second quar- 
ter?" 
"I don't, think so, coach," Giese said. 
"Oklahoma had just substituted," 
Tatum mused. "If I wore our first- 
stringers out, we'd have been worse 
off." ' 

"The No. 2 team should have scored," 
Giese said. "At least, we should have 
had a field goal." 

That Field Goal 
"/ should have had Bielski trying for 
that field goal," Tatum said. Dick 
Bielski, second-string fullback, is the 
Terps' top placement kicker. It was 
ironic that the only first-string back 
Tatum, had in the game was Fullback 
Ralph Felt on, who missed from, a handy 
distance. 

"Felton's kick was straight as a die, 
coach," said Giese, whose ga/me-posi- 
tion was behind the goal posts. "It's 
just that they lined it up all wrong. 
He was way off." 

The siren shrieked and talk stopped. 
When it was quiet, Tatum said, "We 
were flat. I didn't play a very good 
game, myself. I got sentimental, I 
guess." He didn't elaborate. 

Jim turned around and said, "These 
bowl games sure are hell on No. 1 
teams and coaches of the year, aren't 
they? Wilkinson was No. 1, Kentucky 
knocked him, off. Wc knocked off Ten- 
nessee the next year when they were 
No. 1, and Chuck Taylor, when he was 
eoaeh-of-the-ycar, was clobbered, 40 to 
1." 

Nobody said anything for a few 
minutes and then Giese said, "We were 
flat, coach. We went flat when we 
didn't score on our second big chance. 
Maybe they wanted to win a, little 
more than we did." 

"7 To 0," The Man Said 
"We had every break," Tatum re- 
plied, moodily. He put his arm. around 
his boy's shoulders, turned to the back- 
seat passengers and winked. 

"What was the score, Jimmy?" he 
asked, gently. 

"Seven to nothing," Jimmy whisp- 
ered. 

"Sometimes you've got to lose, Jim- 
my," Tatum said. 

One of the other riders finally spoke 
up, "When you had Bernie Faloney 
cutting and running in that special 



pre game warm up, Jim, were you 
thinking of starting him?" 

"Yes," Tatum replied. "He wanted 
to play." 

"From the pressbox he looked pretty 
good," said the other. 

Tatum tvas silent. After a pause, 
Giese said, "Bernie couldn't drive off 
that bum knee. I wish it had been well 
when we were on that one-yard line. 
You can bet he'd have sneaked." 

"Boxold did pretty good, though," 
Tatum said, "He's no Faloney now, but 
he'll be a great quarterback next year. 
Anyway, Oklahoma lost Gene Calame 
for the whole second half and, like Bud 
said a few days ago, he is just as valu- 
able to them as Faloney was to us." 
(Calame suffered a separation of the 
right collarbone in the second period.) 
Stopped On The Line 

"How many times," Tatum said, 
"have you seen Maryland stopped when 
we had a first down inside the 5-yard 
line?" This happened in the oppening 
quarter. 

"It, might have happened, but I don't 
remember it," Giese said. 

"I wish," Tatum replied, "that I 
could forget when it did happen. But 
like I said, we were lucky. We had 
Faloney all season, didn't we? I just 
feel sorry for our seniors. We got 
knocked off in our last two games last 
season and now we wind up like 
this . . ." 

"Coach," said the police sergeant, 
"it wasn't as bad as all that." 

"It wasn't good," Tatum grumbled. 

Tatum said, "Warren, you know how 
many points Oklahoma would have 
scored if Faloney could have played 
defense ?" 

"Yes," Giese answered. "None. And 
we'd have scored 14, anyway, and I'm 
with you on Boxold. He did all right, 
considering." 

"Water under the bridge," Tatum 
muttered. "They gained all their 
ground on our left side. If Faloney' s 
playing, they don't gain. They didn't 
get a loud foul on the right side." 

Tatum, turned to the police sergeant. 
"Up to now," he remarked, "we've 
hod two motorcycle cops to lead the 
way." 

"They didn't show up," apologized the 
cop. 

When You Lose 

"Lot of people don't show up when 
you lose," Jim, said. As the squad car 
finally pulled in front of Maryland's 
hotel, Tatum spoke to his young son. 

"You still love your daddy, don't you 
Jimmy!" 

Jimmy didn't, answer. He was fast, 
asleep. Big Jim gently cradled him in. 
his arms and took him to his bed. 
Lauds Terp Sportsmanship 

Mrs. Ola Grigg, mother of the Oka- 
homa lad who scored the touchdown 
against Maryland, wrote a letter to 
Terp coach Jim Tatum. 

"I never appreciated anything 
more," Big Jim commented. 

Mrs. Grigg's letter: — 

"Doubtless you will be surprised to 
get a letter from Sherman, Texas, but 
I just had to write you. 






54 



'Maryland" 



"I rode 1,500 miles in a 1950 Ford 

to see Maryland heat Oklahoma, but 
you know I just had to go to this 
game. 

I sat with Maryland people all 
around me and we were kidding each 
other before the game. They were the 
finest sports all the way through the 
game. 

"My boy, Larry, made the only 
touchdown that was made. 

"They still were the sweetest peo- 
ple I ever met. I am not surprised 
at your having the No. 1 team of the 
nation. You have such wonderful peo- 
ple behind you and your boys. I know 
you and they hated to lose, but you all 
were wonderful about it. 

"Hurrah For Maryland" 

"I never met you, but I know you 
are a wonderful coach. You had such 
a fine clean bunch of boys on the Mary- 
land team. Several of the Maryland 
people came to me so sweet and con- 
gratulated me for having the boy that 
made the winning touchdown. You 
don't find that spirit everywhere and 
I want to congratulate you for being 
in a State that shows such fine sports- 
manship and .such fine people. 

"If I ever have the pleasure of visit- 
ing Maryland, I'm going to climb on 
someone's housetop and yell at the top 
of my voice, 'Hurrah for such good 
people'." 

(1954 Football Schedule on Page 51) 



DR. BYRD HONORED 

(Continued from Page 4) 

youngest County Commissioner ever 
elected in Somerset County, served 
four years as postmaster at Crisfield 
and served two sessions in the Mary- 
land Legislature as a delegate from 
Somerset County. 

While in high school and between his 
first two years in college, Dr. Byrd 
spent his summers working on the 
water as a crabber or in his father's 
business of buying and shipping crabs, 
or on the farm. On Saturdays in the 
fall he was usually working on his 
uncle's oyster boat. In his early years 
he learned to work, while in grade 
school he clerked in the evenings and 
Saturdays in his uncle's store. 
In 1905 

Dr. Byrd graduated from the Cris- 
field High School in 1905 and entered 
the Maryland Agricultural College at 
College Park that same fall. His father 
had advised him to attend Dickinson 
College to study law, as his father felt 
that there was a large field for a young 
lawyer in Somerset County. However, 
young Byrd followed his high school 
principal's advice, with his father's con- 
sent, to enter the Maryland Agricultur- 
al College to study Engineering, be- 
cause, as his high school principal 
stated it, "Engineering is the field that 
teaches a man to think and teaches 
him how to get things done." 

Maryland Agricultural College, at 
that time, owing to a lack of high 
schools, gave a lot of what was little 
more than high school work in its 

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freshman class. Byrd, after taking 
two examinations, was allowed to enter 
the sophomore class. He completed the 
engineering curriculum in three years. 

After graduating at the Maryland 
Agricultural College, Dr. Byrd studied 
law at both George Washington and 
Georgetown and took a semester of 
special courses in ethics, public speak- 
ing, literature, philosophy, history and 
economics at Western Maryland Col- 
lege. Byrd, at that time, was playing 
semi-professional baseball at Hagers- 
town, Cambridge and Seaford, Dela- 
ware. He played end and quarterback 
on the Maryland Agricultural College 
team and played quarterback at both 
Georgetown and George Washington 
and ran on the Western Maryland track 
team and played infield on the baseball 
team. 

While he took part in athletics at 
these institutions, Byrd's main objec- 
tive was to obtain a type of education 
that he had not been able to get as a 
student in the highly technical courses 
at the Maryland Agricultural College. 
Apparently, he was then looking ahead 
toward a career along lines that had 
somewhat earlier been outlined by his 
father. 

For The "Star" 

In 1910, Byrd went to work for the 
Washington Evening Star as a sports 
writer and, at the same time, had 
charge of athletics at Western High 
School in Washington. He continued 
his newspaper work until he became 
President of the University in 1935, 
and there are some of the older peo- 
ple on the Washington Star today 
who think that Byrd's influence in 
newspaper circles, and in commanding 
space in the Star, was in many ways 
helpful in the development of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. President Byrd 
came to the University for a two 
weeks' coaching job in 1911, when he 
coached both his high school team and 
the Agricultural College team at the 
same time. His success in the final 
game that year was so signal that it 
launched a movement to bring him 
back to the Agricultural College as 
coach. Byrd came to the Maryland 
Agricultural College the following 
year on a permanent basis. 

University History 

When Dr. Byrd came to the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, in the Fall of 1912, 
the University was known as Mary- 
land Agricultural Collesre. The college 
consisted of five small buildings, one 
a part of the present Infirmary: the 
others Morrill Hall; the Dean of Wom- 
en's Building; the present Geography 
Building, then used for chemistrv; and 
the building now used for offices of 
the College of Business and Public 
Administration; and two dormitories 
housing 160 students, which occupied 
the space where the Dining Room now 
stands. 

Curriculums consisted of Civil, Me- 
chanical and Electrical Engineering, 
Animal Husbandry, Dairy Husbandry, 
Agronomy and Horticulture, and Gen- 
eral Science. Laboratorv and class- 



56 



room facilities were, as to be expected, 
very meager. The only facility for 
athletics was an open field, without 
stands of any kind. 

The building presently occupied by 
the Dean of Women, served two pur- 
poses, the lower floor being the gym- 
nasium and the upper floor the library. 
President Byrd came to the Mary- 
land Agricultural College as a teacher 
in History and English, coach of all 
sports, and, in addition, handled public 
relations. For these jobs his salary 
was $100 per month. 

The Big Fire 
On Thanksgiving night, 1912, the 
two dormitories were completely de- 
stroyed by fire and the college faced 
a serious situation. Proposals were 
made to move the college to Sparks 
in Baltimore County instead of try- 
ing to rebuild the dormitories. The 
classroom buildings then existent were 
rated as more or less negligible, their 
total value hardly being in excess of 
875,000. 

Alumni rallied to the support of the 
college and demanded that the location 
be retained. An active campaign was 
begun to have the people in the neigh- 
borhood take in the students to lodge 
and board. This was accomplished and 
the college continued its operation al- 
most without interrunt'on. 

The situation at the time was further 
aggravated by the serious illness of 
Dr. R. W. Sylvester, who had Been 
president since the early nineties. Pro- 
fessor Thomas Humphrey Spence was 
made Acting President and, in 1913, 
Dr. H. J. Patterson, the Director of 
the Agricultural Experiment Station, 
was elected by the board to the presi- 
dency. Dr. Patterson, with his usual 
vision, Ihought that the college would 
never develop as long as it was con- 
trolled by private interests, although, 
the State, at the time did have a 
mortgage interest in the nroperty. Dr. 
Patterson appointed as his secretary 
the late Reuben Brigham, and then 
commissioned Brigham and Byrd, who 
was in charge of public relations, to 
see what could be done toward giving 
the State ownership and control. A 
propaganda campaign was initiated 
and a committee of the Legislature 
was appointed to investigate the col- 
lege, its position in relation to the 
State, and its educational standing. 
In 1914 
At the 1914 Session of the Legisla- 
ture, the Legislative Commission made 
its report, carrying with it a recom- 
mendation that the State take over 
the college, to make it in effect a 
State college and give it substantial 
financial support. The Legislature 
failed to act on the recommendation 
of its committee. However, the ques- 
tion was kept alive and the Legislature 
of 1910 took over, by proper legisla- 
tive enactment, the old Maryland Agri- 
cultural College and created the Mary- 
land State College. 

During this period, athletics began 
to develop substantially. Tn 1912, the 
University defeated Hopkins, for the 
first time, but lost to St. John's of 
Annapolis, an old rival. In 1913, both 

"Maryland" 



Hopkins and St. John's were defeated 
and the baseball team won the State 
championship. In 1914, Hopkins and 
St. John's again were beaten, but in 
1915 Hopkins won on a field goal, three 
to nothing. In 1916, on Thanksgiving 
Day, Hopkins was swamped by a 
score of 52 to 0, and New York Uni- 
versity was defeated in New York. 

In 1916 

Following the legislative act of 1916, 
Dr. Patterson suggested that the Board 
look around for a new president in 
order that he might devote hi.s entire 
duties to the Agricultural Experiment 
Service, of which he had been director 
for many years. As a result, Dr. Al- 
bert F. Woods, Dean of Agriculture at 
the University of Minnesota, came to 
Maryland to be president of the State 
College. After taking up his duties in 
College Park, with the first World 
War on, he soon became cognizant of 
certain differences that had arisen 
between the then coach and Instructor 
Byrd and certain members of the fac- 
ulty. Dr. Patterson had partially re- 
solved these differences by placing 
Byrd completely in charge of athletics, 
but Dr. Woods, after investigation, 
gave young Byrd the title and duties 
of Assistant to the President. Curley, 
in telling the story of that, says that 
when he was summoned to Dr. Woods' 
off-ce one morning in the spring of 
1918, he did not know whether or not 
he was to be fire summarily, or what 
might happen. 

In 1918 

In the summer of 1918, Byrd wanted 
to take the Officers' Training Camp 
Work at Camp Meade, but after Col- 
onel Pitcher, who was sent to institute 
the Student Army Training Corps at 
the college, had taken him in to see 
General Crowther, who was head of 
the draft organization, Byrd was per- 
suaded to remain at the college to man- 
age the affairs of the new military 
venture. The college that fall had 
more than 600 students, three times 
more than it had ever had before. 
When the Student Army Training 
Corps was disbanded and reconversion 
to civil life began, Byrd, a,s Assistant 
to the President, practically took over 
the management, under the President's 
direction, of the student body, public 
re'ations, reorganization of the educa- 
tional program, and began to act as 
Assistant to the President in all mat- 
ters relating to the conduct of the col- 
lege. From this time, when visiting 
other colleges and universities as coach 
of the athletic teams, Byrd always 
made it a part of his job to visit the 
administrative and business offices of 
the host institut'ons to study their 
administrative organizations. It is lit- 
tle wonder, therefore, that he soon be- 
came thoroughly familiar with uni- 
versity work, and was able, in his edu- 
cational reorganization plan, to put 
into effect at the University of Mary- 



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land the best of what other universi- 
ties were doing. In this Byrd was 
helped a good deal by Dr. Harold F. 
Cotterman, who had just come to the 
University and who now is Dean of the 
Faculty. The organization then estab- 
lished is essentially the present organi- 
zation, so sound was the concept of 
education procedure and operation 
young Byrd had gained in his visits to 
other schools. 

It perhaps would be well to know 
that President Byrd now is working on 
some changes in the University's or- 
ganization that are likely to make less 
exacting in details the work of a new 
President. 

The Amalgamation 

At this time, the college began to 
expand its athletic activities and in 
1919 defeated the University of Vir- 
ginia and in the spring of that same 
year took a trip throughout the South 
in which it defeated baseball teams in 
several State universities. 

At that time, too, began the move- 
ment that was probably more sig- 
nificant educationally in the history of 
Maryland than any other venture, that 
of the amalgamation of the old Uni- 
versity of Maryland with the Maryland 
State College to make a State univer- 
sity in fact. Dr. Arthur M. Shipley 
and Dr. J. M. H. Rowland of theMedi- 
cal School in Baltimore discussed the 
matter with the President of the Uni- 
versity and it became the job of the 
President's Assistant to manage the 
bill through the Legislature to create 
the institution that has become the 
present University of Maryland. 

Governor Ritchie was lukewarm to 
the idea but did not want publicly to 
oppose it. Former United States Sena- 
tor Millard E. Tydings was the Speak- 
er of the House of Delegates. He and 
President Byrd and Judge Cole, pres- 
ent Chairman of the Board of Regents, 
had been students together at the old 
Maryland Agricultural College. The 
bill passed the Legislature of 1920 and 
the Governor signed the bill, making 
it law. Under that bill, all the property 
of the old University of Maryland was 
conveved to the Board of Trustees of 
the Maryland State College and the 
Board of Trustees became the Board of 
Regents of the University. 

A Winning Fight 

But hardly had the University begun 
to operate before a rather deliberate 
attempt was made to destroy it. The 
attempt was motivated by interests in 
Baltimore City but was spearheaded 
by Governor Ritchie. The governor 
had a bill drawn, w r hich carried with it 
what was then a large appropriation, 
and had it introduced in the Legisla- 
ture of 1924. 

This action was the cause of one of 
the hardest fights that have ever tak- 
en place in a Maryland Legislature. 
The more difficult fight was in the Sen- 
ate, where the University forces won 
by a vote of 15 to 14. While Byrd 
led the University forces in this fight 



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against Governor Ritchie, the two men 
later became fast friends, notwith- 
standing the fact that two years before 
Byrd had made a speech in Baltimore 
rather severely criticizing the Governor 
for his failure to support the Univer- 
sity, and to which the Governor had 
taken public exception. 

Meanwhile, with more substantial 
appropriations and an increasing stu- 
dent body, the University was develop- 
ing its educational program and inter- 
collegiate athletics as well. In the fall 
of 1923 it defeated the University of 
Pennsylvania in football, played Yale's 
greatest team to a 14-16 game and in 
1920 had beaten Syracuse, North Caro- 
lina State and other schools. 

Assistant To President 

In 1926, President Woods resigned to 
become Director of the Graduate School 
of the United States Department of 
Agriculture, and Dr. Raymond A. Pear- 
son, President of Iowa State College, 
came to Maryland to take Dr. Woods' 
place. Dr. Byrd remained as Assistant 
to the President under President Pear- 
son until 1932, when he was given the 
title of Vice-President. It is interesting 
to note that Judge Cole, present Chair- 
man of the Board of Regents, made the 
motion which called the Board of Re- 
gents to give Dr. Byrd the promotion. 

Slow But Sure 

During this period, the University 
had continued a slow but sure growth. 
Its student body was increasing coin- 
cident with the improvements in its 
educational offerings. It had won in 
football twice from Yale and was 
gaining its share of victories in com- 
petition in Virginia, North Carolina, 
Rutgers, and similar institutions. A 
new athletic field and a new gymnas- 



58 



'Maryland" 



ium had been built in 1923. It was 
during this period that the need for 
improved hospital facilities in Haiti- 
more for the Medical School became 
increasingly evident and Governor 
Ritchie decided to give the old Uni- 
versity Hospital $300,000 to refurbish 
it and to construct a new wing. The 
Assistant to the I 'resident prevailed 
upon Governor Ritchie to allocate this 
money for a Law School Ruilding and 
to appoint a special commission to 
study the needs of the University in 
Baltimore City for a new Hospital 
Building. Dr. Byrd visited Mr. George 
M. Shriver, the Executive Vice-Presi- 
dent of the B. and O. Railroad, pre- 
vailed upon him to act as the Chair- 
man of the Commission, whose study 
later resulted in the construction of 
the present University Hospital. Short- 
ly after this, in regard to appointments 
for the Dental and Pharmacy Schools, 
difficulties arose between the Chair- 
man of the Board of Regents and the 
Governor, which the Assistant to the 
President was able to resolve, and the 
present Dental and Pharmacy Build- 
ing was constructed harmoniously. 
1933 Investigation 
In 1933, actually as a result of criti- 
cism by the largest newspaper in the 
State, the Legislature decided to ap- 
point a commission to investigate the 
University. This Commission met sev- 
eral times at the University at College 
Park and at Baltimore, interviewed 
members of the Faculty, as well as 
the President and the Assistant to the 
President, and, as a result, made a 
report to the Legislature in which it 
not only gave the University a clean 
bill of health, but recommended that 
it be better supported and that money 
be provided for it for new buildings. 

"The Committee is of the opinion, 
because of the intimate touch of Vice- 
President Byrd with all phases of the 
University's work, and his present ap- 
preciation, irrespective of what his 
former views may have been, of the 
necessity of building up a University 
within the means and resources of the 
State, that he occupies a position in 
the life of the University that it would 
be difficult to replace." 

An old politician at Annapolis, the 
morning the above report was made, 
remarked somewhat facetiously that 
"The Committee has not only cleared 
Byrd, but has annointed both him and 
the University." 

Acting President 
In 1935, when President Pearson left 
the University to join the United 
States Department of Agriculture, Dr. 
Byrd became Acting President. The 
following winter he was formally 
elected President by the Board of Re- 
gents at a meeting in Baltimore. Short- 
ly after his election as President, he 
began an active, aggressive campaign 
movement to attain better facilities 
and more money for the maintenance 
of the University. He went before the 
Legislature of 1937 with a plea for 
more money to build up the educational 
departments. Despite a campaign 
against him and the University by a 

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big newspaper, he was finally granted 
exactly what he asked for both for 
maintenance and building purposes. 

Credits Governor Nice 

Following this, Byrd began negotia- 
tions with the Public Works Adminis- 
tration of the Federal Government to 
obtain Federal funds also, and after 
considerable negotiation, a consider- 
able amount of Federal Government 
money was procured to add to the 
$1,174,000 he had obtained from the 
State, with a result that the Univer- 
sity of Maryland for the first time was 
able to begin a substantial building 
program. It was under Governor Nice 
that the money for this program was 
obtained and Byrd to this day gives 
Governor Nice credit for having put 
the University of Maryland on its way 
to becoming the kind of an institution 
it now is. 

When World War II broke out in 
1941, the War Department again co- 
operated with the University, and the 
University devoted the larger part of 
its program again to training of men 
for the Armed Services. During the 
war, by utilizing prisoners from the 
Maryland House of Correction and the 
Penitentiary, three new dormitories 
and the Armory were constructed, the 
University doing its own work. These 
were about the only buildings con- 
structed by any college or university 
during the war years. 

Governor Lane, elected in 1946, took 
a kindly interest in the University 
and it was through Governor Lane's 
help that President Byrd was able to 
make great strides in the development 
of the University and in meeting the 
tremendous pressure of students that 
came on all institutions immediately 
after the war. From that time until 
the present, the University has rapidly 
developed its educational program, its 
research, its extension services, and 
its controls in the field of agriculture. 




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Glenn L. Martin 

Not only from the State Legislature 
and from the Federal Government was 
President Byrd able to obtain money 
for his building program, but he inter- 
ested his friend, Glenn L. Martin, in 
the development of the University's 
Engineering College to an extent that 
Mr. Martin in 1945-46 made a gift of 
$2,500,000 to the University for this 
purpose. Governor O'Conor, in the Leg- 
is'ative Session of 1945, added almost 
$1,000,000 in his bond issue to supple- 
ment Mr. Martin's gift. The present 
Poultry Building was erected largely 
with a gift of $115,000 by the late 
Charles McManus. The baseball and 
outdoor theater, under construction, 
are the result of anonymous gifts of 
$40,000 from two friends of Dr. Byrd. 

RIFLE TEAM 

Army 1436; Maryland 1431 

At West Point, Army's rifle team, 
nosed out Marvland's '54 team, 1436- 
1431. 

Maryland Downs M.I.T. 

Maryland outshot M.I.T., 1433-1420, 
with Terp ail-Americans Jim Wells 
and Bud Barton each firing high scores 
of 291. 

Terps Take G.W., Hopkins 

Maryland's Linn Savage, with 290, 
was high man as Maryland's 1430, 
topped George Washington's 1352, and 
Johns Hopkins' 1341, in a 3-way match. 



60 



Terrapin Grid Honors 

Stan Jones — Unanimous All-America 

Collier's All-America — Selected as Col- 
lier's "Lineman of the Year" 

Washington Touchdown Club "Line- 
man of the Year — Awarded Knute 
Rockne Memorial Trophy. 

Associated Press First Team All- 
America 

International News Service First Team 
All-America 

United Press First Team All-America 

Look Magazine First Team All-Amer- 
ica 

All-Players All-America First Team 

NEA All-America First Team, All- 
America blocking team 

Christy Walsh First Team All-America 

New York Daily News First Team All- 
America 

Washington Daily News First Team 
All-America 

The Quarterback-Sporting News First 
Team All-America 

National Broadcasting Company First 
Team All-America 

Harry Wismer's radio poll, "Every- 
body's All-America" 

Bill Stern's First Team All- America 

Time Magazine Consensus First Team 
All-America 

First Team All-America Paramount 
News, Movietone News MGM-News 
of the Day 

All-Conference First Team Associated 
Press 

All-Conference First Team Southern 
Sports Writers' Association 

"Marylajid" 



All-South Associated Press; All South 

United Press 
All-Players All-South 

Hemic Faloney 
All-Players All-America Pirsl Team 
Internationa] News Service First Team 

All- America 
First Team All-America selected by 

United Tress Writer Steve Snider 

Time Magazine Consensus First Team 
All-America 

National Broadcasting Company First 
Team All-America 

Williamson's First Team All-America 
Bill Stern's First Team All-America 

First Team All-America Paramount 
News, Movietone New.s, MGM-News 
of the Day 

Associated Press Second Team All- 
America 

United Press Second Team All-America 

New York Daily News Second Team 
All-America 

Washington Daily News First Team 
All- America 

NEA Second Team All-America 

The Quarterback-Sporting News Sec- 
ond Team All-America 

All-America Backneld First Team se- 
lected by Washington Touchdown 
Club, Walter Camp Memorial 

Atlantic Coast Conference "Player of 
the Year" 

First Team All-Conference Associated 
Press 

First Team All-Conference Southern 
Sports Writers Association 

All-Players All-South 

All-South Associated Press 

All-South United Press 

Associated Press "Back of the Week," 
runnerup twice, third once 

United Press member of "Backfield of 
Week" twice 

Chester Hanulak 

New Jersey's College Athlete of the 
Year 

International News Service Second 
Team All-America 

Associated Press All-America Honor- 
able Mention 

United Press All-America Honorable 
Mention 

NEA All-America Honorable Mention 

Associated Press All-Conference First 
Team 

First Team All-Conference Southern 
Sports Writers Association 

United Press All-South 

New York Daily News All-South 

Washington Daily News Second Team 
All-America 

Associated Press "Back of Week" Men- 
tion 

Ralph Felton 

Associated Press All-America Honor- 
able Mention 

United Press All-America Honorable 
Mention 

NEA AU-American Honorable Mention 

First Team Associated Press All-Con- 
ference 

United Press All-South 

Second Team All-Conference of South- 
ern Sports Writers Association 
Jack Bowersox 

First Team All-Conference Southern 
Sports Writers Association 

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Second Team Associated Press All- 
Conference 

Second Team United Press All-South 
Bill Walker 

United Press All-America Honorable 
Mention 

Second Team All-Conference Associ- 
ated Press 

Second Team All-Conference Southern 
Sports Writers Association 

Nation's "Lineman of the Week," As- 
sociated Press after Alabama game 
Bob Morgan 

United Press All-America Honorable 
Mention 

Associated Press Second Team All- 
Conference 

Solthern Sports Writers Association 
Second Team All-Conference 

John Irvine 
United Press All-America Honorable 
Mention 

Third Team Southern Sports Writers 
All-Conference 

Marty Crytzer 

Associated Press Third Team All-Con- 
ference 

Third Team Southern Snorts Writers 
Association All-Conference 

Third Team All-America, Washington 
Daily News 

Dick Noaln 

Associated Press Third Team All-Con- 
ference 

Tom Breunich 

Associated Press All-Conference Hon- 
orable Mention 



WASHINGTON HONORS TERPS 

(Concluded from Page 14) 

The Cleveland Browns pro football 
team won third place and unbeaten but 
once-tied Notre Dame football team 
was fourth, followed by the Indiana 
basketball team, Big Ten and NCAA 
champion; the Milwaukee Braves of the 
National League; the Detroit Lions, 
National Football League champions 
for a second straight year; the Minne- 
apolis Lakers, National Basketball As- 
sociation champions; the Navy crew, 
unbeaten in two years of competition; 




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and Brooklyn's National League cham- 
pions. 

All- America Blockers 

Stan Jones, of Maryland, heads the 
seventeenth annual All-America block- 
ing team selected by a writer's panel 
headed by Sports Editor Wirt Gammon 
of the Chatanooga Times. 

Others named to the blocking team 
were Crawford Mims, Mississippi; Bill 
Fenton, Iowa; Mam Boyston, Okla- 
homa; Art Hunter, Notre Dame; Milt 
Bohart, Washington; Mat Hazeltime, 
California; Jerry Coody, Baylor; Mel 
Holme, Minnesota; Glenn Turner, 
Georgia Tech, and Tom Allman, West 
Virginia. 

Sooners' Selections 

Maryland Tackle Bob Morgan and 
Guard John Bowersox were named to 
Oklahoma's 1953 All-Opponent foot- 
ball team. 

Touchdown Club Awards 

At the Washington Touchdown 
Club's Annual Football Awards Ban- 
quet the Walter Camp Memorial Award 
went jointly to Bernie Faloney, Mary- 
land; Alan Ameche, Wisconsin; Paul 
Giel, Minnesota, and Johnny Lattner, 
Notre Dame. 

Stan Jones, Maryland, received the 
Knute Rockne Memorial. 

Top Jersey Athlete 

Chet Hanulak, Maryland's elusive 
halfback, was honored as New Jer- 
sey's outstanding collegiate athlete of 
1953 by the Newark Athletic Club at 
its 14th annual sports award banquet. 
Mexico's Best 

Tom Chisari, former University of 
Maryland player and later coach at 
Catholic University, has been named 
coach of the year in Mexico by the 
Mexican Football Writers. He is coach- 
ing Mexico City College which lost only 
one game this year. 



MARYLAND OVERSEAS 

(Continued from Page 8) 

ing from base to base in a specially 
packed book kit. For the stateside pro- 
gram, an Off-Campus Library Service 
has been established and a bookmobile 
is operated for this purpose. 

The overseas instructors may set up 
teaching quarters in quonset huts, 
snack bars, exclusive hotels, tents and 
under other conditions not seen or ex- 
perienced in any stateside program. 
Under College of S&CS 

The College of Special and Continua- 
tion Studies is charged with the re- 
sponsibility of planning, coordinating, 
surveying and administrating all off 
campus work both overseas and at 
home. The courses offered overseas are 
the same as those offered on the Col- 
lege Park campus. The courses of 
study arranged for the off campus 
program points primarily to the Bache- 
lor of Science degree in Military Sci- 
ence and the Bachelor of Arts degree 
in General Studies. Courses are taught 
in business administration, economics. 
English, foreign languages, geography, 
government and politics, history, 
mathematics, military science, psy- 
chology, sociology, and speech. 



62 



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When Dr. A. E. Zucker, former Eur- 
opean director) made bia report on 

teaching conditions overseas! he noted* 
the local conditions at the Nouasseur 
Air Base. He said teachers receive liv- 
ing conditions of "field grade officer 
quality," thai is, they Live in Dallas 
Huts (wallboard-like structures). Each 

one has his own field cot, dresser, 
clothes rack, and table. The hut that 
Serves as classroom, has a table and 
hook cases where teachers may work 

undisturbed all day until the hours 

for the evening lectures from 7 to 1". 
Each language teacher in this pro- 
gram works under the Director of 
Languages in Heidelberg, Germany. 

Generally the program acquires the 

assistance of Nationals to teach the 
Courses, and they, in turn, are sub- 
jected to tests and rigid academic qual- 
ifications before taking up their teach- 
ing assignments. 

The chief headquarters for overseas 
activity for the University is located 
in Heidelberg. The office is under the 
direction of Dr. Augustus J. Prahl. 
Night Courses 

All of the courses taught off campus 
are held at night, with one exception. 
In some cases, such as tho.se in areas 
of extreme heat, it is necessary to hold 
the classes outside under the stars. 
The one exception to night class peri- 
ods, is the day program in Munich. 

In 1951, the overseas program made 
available at Munich a program of 
freshman and sophomore level courses, 
primarily designed to meet the needs 
of service personnel dependents who 
are qualified for college work. The 
courses are of American college stand- 
ard and are for the most part those 
required in the curricula of the College 
of Arts and Sciences. 

The Munich program was opened at 
the request of the military, to provide 
college level educational opportunities 
for the sons and daughters of Armed 
Force personnel stationed overseas. At 
Munich logistical support, including 
dormitory facilities, is made available 
to authorized dependents. The students 
live in the BOQ's at McGraw Kaserne, 
established by the Military. "Out of 
Town" coeds are billeted on the top 
floor of the building which houses the 
military police. 

The classrooms are located in what 
was once an Army headquarters build- 
ing. Recreational facilities are similar 
to those available to students on the 
College Park Campus. 

During the same year (1951) that 
the Munich program was established, 
further expansion of facilities saw the 
University opening centers in New- 
foundland, Laborador and Greenland. 
All instructors report that Thule, 
Greenland is one of the most interest- 
ing assignments where during the 
Winter season 24 hours of darkness 
prevails. 

Excellent Cooperation 

Dr. Ehrensberger reports excellent 
cooperation from Command Headquar- 
ters at Pepperrell Air Force Base lo- 
cated at St. Johns, Newfoundland. 



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Maryland" 



The University's slogan, for the 
CSCS program, "Maryland Serves You 
While You Serve" expresses the atti- 
tude of the University of Maryland 
toward meeting the educational needs 
of the country's service personnel. 

The entire CSCS program provides 
an excellent opportunity for military 
personnel to continue their education 
while overseas and serving their tour 
of duty. The I. and E. program points 
toward raising the academic levels of 
all persons in the armed services. When 
the military reached the college level 
they did not attempt to provide in- 
struction themselves and therefore 
called for assistance from civilian col- 
leges and universities to meet the de- 
mand for higher education. 

Most Extensi\t 

The most extensive of all programs 
sponsored by the I. and E. at this level 
is that the University of Maryland. The 
University conducts classes not only in 
overseas centers for the military hut 
also at the Pentagon, at Boiling Field, 
and many other local military installa- 
tions. 

Students taking advantage of the 
overseas program often have to travel 
great distances to make their evening 



63 



lecture.-. Many men enrolled in the 
program have asked for extension of 
their tour of duty at a particular post 
ovei order to continue their 

work. One such student, extended his 
in Iceland to finish his course re- 
quirements for a degree. 

. Richard Levardsen, stationed 
in Germany, recorded 20,000 miles 
driving to and from his evening class 
Munich, during his stay in Germany. 
Corpora] Bobby C. Turnhow traveled 
5,000 miles from Saint Johanne to go 
n Salzburg. 



Many of our nation's foremost mili- 
tary leaders have praised the benefits 
to be derived from the furtherance of 
education for the Armed Forces. Ad- 
miral Chester W. Nimitz, U.S.N., 
summed up with, "The most effective 
weapon we imposed upon the enemy 
was EDUCATION." 

Accentuating the value of education 
by constant study, General Clifton B. 
Cates, U. S. Marine Corns, said in an 
address at the University of Maryland, 
"There is no place in the world for a 
closed mind or one that has stopped 



HE 7 S 

TELLING 




HIM! 



WHAT GOES ON AT OUR ALMA MATER? 
WHAT OF OUR CLASSMATES? WHAT'S THE 
ALUMNI NEWS? THE SPORTS NEWS? 



ALUMNUS 



The Alumnus At The Left Above knows ALL the answers. HE SUB- 
SCRIBES TO "MARYLAND," THE ALUMNI MAGAZINE. 

The Other Fellow? He's just been missing the bus. He's in the dark. 

IF you're the fellow at the left above, clip this ad and coupon and 
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yy> SECRETARY, ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, 

$•§ UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

Enclosed herewith is $ ,my contribution to the 

Alumni Fund. $3.00 of this amount is for a subscription to "MARYLAND" 
for one year. 



growing. Education is a lifetime prop- 
osition. When a man stops learning, 
he stops living. There remains only 
the formality of burying him." 

Newsweek And Time 

Two of the foremost weekly maga- 
zines have printed articles about Mary- 
land's unique off campus educational 
program. Newsweek, released an arti- 
cle in their June 12, 1950 issue under 
the heading, "Round-The-World-Col- 
lege," and Time Magazine, printed an 
article on September 10, 1951 under the 
title, "Overseas Campus." 

Newsweek stated, "The U. of M. proj- 
ect grew out of a speech class in- 
augurated in 1947 at the Pentagon in 
Washington. More and more courses 
were added with full residence cred- 
its . . ." 

"With both the Army and the Aii 
Force setting a future goal of twe 
years of college training for every 
officer, such projects as Maryland's are 
vital to advancement in the services." 

Time Magazine said, "Most of the 
world's undergraduates were still on 
vacation. But on one of the world's 
largest campuses, some 3,000 were 
taking final exams. From . . . Ger- 
many, to Asmara, high on an African 
plateau, American servicemen and a 
handful of civilian employees trooped 
to their classrooms, sweated over ques- 
tions that ranged from literature to 
logistics. These students were mem- 
bers of the University of Maryland's 
College of Special and Continuation 
Studies." 

Clamor For Education 

"In Germany, in England, at air bases 
in North Africa, G.I.'s who were home- 
sick for college campuses, frustrated 
students from U. of M.'s off campus 
courses in Washington, pilots who were 
feeling the squeeze of new educational 
requirements for commissions — all 
clamored for further schooling. In 
October 1949, planning on a maximum 
of 500 students, the Armed Forces 
shipped a supply of books and Mary- 
land professors to six centers in Ger- 
many. On registration day, they were 
swamped with 1,800 applicants." 

Thus national recognition has been 
accorded the work that is carried on 
in the vast off campus program by the 
University of Maryland as a part of 
the military program to further Armed 
Forces education in the United States 
and Overseas. 

Today the CSCS program, with head- 
quarters at College Park, Maryland 
and an overseas office in Heidelberg 
has instructors who travel throughout 
the program teaching at 85 centers, 
located in 16 countries on four conti- 
nents— North America, Europe, Africa, 
and Asia. 



64 



"Maryland!' 





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University, o[ ^Maryland cAlumni Publication l^mmi 



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VOL. XXV. NO. 3 



MESSAGE TO 



AN 1 


ENGINEER 


THINKING ABOUT 


THE 


FUTURE- 


HIS 


FUTURE 



Take a few moments now to review the progress of your 
career. Does your present position offer you a future that 
fully utilizes your creative abilities? 

Compare your present assignment with the diversified, 
stimulating pursuits that increase the inventive challenge 
of Fairchild's team of qualified engineers. These men are 
working on engineering advances for the famous C-119 
Flying Boxcar and the soon-to-he-produced C-123 Assault 
Transport. More than that, they are developing tomorrow's 
jet fighters . . . special reconnaisance aircraft . . . jet bomb- 
ers and transports. The men at Fairchild know that planned 
project diversification keeps them in the forefront of the 
field of aerodynamics. 

Gracious country living only minutes away from urban 
Baltimore or Washington . . . paid pension plan ... an ex- 
cellent salary with paid vacations . . . ideal working envi- 
ronment . . . generous health, hospitalization and life 
insurance . . . and the many other benefits of a progressive 
company add to the pleasure of working with Fairchild. 

You'll be investing wisely in a secure future if you take 
time today to write to Walter Tydon, Chief Engineer, out- 
lining your qualifications. Your correspondence will be 
kept in strict confidence, of course. 



» ENGINE AND AIRPLANE CORPORATION 

Fairchild 

fri/ida/l Vlvidim 

HAGERSTOWN, MARYLAND 



Vol. XXV 



Mar-June, 1954 



Xo. 3 




^ȣ&<W 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of 
Maryland, and entered at the Pout Oilier, 
College Park, ifd., a* second class mail mat- 
ter under the let o) Congress of March 3, 
1879. (3.00 /" /• year — Fifty cents t)ie copy. 



HARVEY L. MILLER, Managing Editor 

Director of Publications ami Publicity 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Md. 



SALLY L. OGDEN. Advertising Dire, tor 

Eighteen W. Twenty-fifth St. 

Baltimore 1. Sid. 

IK). 7-9018 



JULIET WOODFIELD. Circulation 
Representative 
5 East 33rd Street 
Baltimore. Sid. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Officers 

Dr. Albert E. Goldstein '12. President 
Col. O. H. Saunders '10. Vice-President 
J. Homer Remsberg 'IS. Vice-President 
David L. Brlgham '38, Executive Secretary 

General Alumni Council 

AGRICULTURE — Lee W. Adkins '42. Abram 

Z. GottwalS '38. J. Homer Remsberg 'IS. 
ARTS' & SCIENCES— William H. Press '28, 

Marjorie R. Wharton '41. C. G. Donovan 

'17. 
BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADSIIXISTRATIOX— 

Norman Sinclair '43. Harry A. Boswell. Jr. 

'42. Roger L. Odette '52. 
DENTAL — Eugene L. Pessage. Jr. '40. Albert 

C. Cook '38, William E. Trail '20. 
EDUCATION — R. Louise Sudlow '50, Stewart 

McCaw '35, Florence L. Duke '50. 
ENGINEERING — S. Chester Ward '32, C. V. 

Koons '2!). Col. O. H. Saunders '10. 
HOME ECOXOSIICS'— Katharine A. Longride 

'29. John G. Prendergast '33. 
MEDICAL — Albert E. Goldstein '12. Thurs- 
ton R. Adams "34. William H. Triplett 11. 
PHARMACY— Prank Block '24. Frank Black 

'04. Benjamin F. Allen '37. 
NURSING — Flora Street '38, Eva Darlev '27, 

Martha Curtiss '4S. 

Alumni Clubs 

BALTIMORE — Wm. H. Triplett. '11. 
CARROLL COUNTY— Sherman E. Flanagan, 

Sr. '24. 
CUMBERLAND— Dr. J. Russell Cook '23. 
EASTERN' SHORE— Otis Twillv '21. 
"M" CLUB — Sam Sillier. '::4. 
XEW ENGLAND — It. A. R. Cook. 'On. 
NEW YORK— Sliss Sarah E. Morris, '21 
PITTSBURGH — Gordon Kessler. '29. 
PRINCE GEORGE'S CO.— Egbert Tingle, -27. 
RICIISIOND — Paul Mulliniz, '36. 
SCHENECTADY— Mrs. Slarie Esher. '4r.. 
TERRAPIN— James W. Stevens, '17. 

Ex-Officio 

I'.isi President — Dr. A. I. Bell. '19. 
Past President — T. T. Speer, '17. 
University President — Dr. H. C. Byrd. '08. 
Executive Secretary — David L. Brlgham, '33. 



Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Consulting Engineer 

100 W. MONUMENT STREET 
Baltimore 1, Md. 




G 



ood News for Telephone Users 



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FEDERAL EXCISE TAX 
ON LOCAL SERVICE 

REDUCED 

FROM 
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__^_^_^ . i 



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BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 




The Passing of A Great and Gracious Lady 



Grief Stricken Campus Honors Memory of Alma H. 

Preinkert, Departed Registrar, Victim of Brutality. 

Saves Sister's Life With Final Act, After 

Lifetime of Outstanding Service to Others. 



May her couch be soft near the singing 

streams. 
Mail she rest in peace in the land of 

dreams. 
We'll think of her, neath the guarding 

loam, 
As the friend who said. "I'll lead you 

home." 

&y Jfatvey I. Millet. 

The question "Why?" Why did it 
have to happen to her?", expressed 
the quite natural reaction to the 
accounts of the violent death of Mary- 
land's Registrar, Alma H. Preinkert. 

Through the years, 1919 to date, Miss 
Preinkert, not unlike James Hilton's 
"Goodbye Mr. Chips," had enjoyed the 
affection and respect of all who came 
in contact with her, from the senior 
faculty members to the most verdant 
freshmen. 

Never Too Busy For Others 

Gracious, considerate, tolerant, kind 
and, withal, assiduous and efficient, 
Alma Preinkert exemplified the highest 
qualities of service and loyalty to the 
University; never too busy to aid with 
advice and encouragement and always 
ready with a word of commendation 
for any job well done. 

To lose a relative, dear friend or 
colleague through death by natural 
causes presents reason enough for 
sorrow. However, when death occurs 
through criminal violence, it becomes 
more difficult to accept. 

"Why?" 

Answer From The Cross 

As the chimes of the campus chapel 
she loved rang with the strains of 
"Nearer My God To Thee," "Abide 
With Me" and "Rock of Ages," the 
Reverend J. Victor Murtland (Grace 
Lutheran Church), eulogized Miss 
Preinkert with, "Her life was spent 
in the service of mankind," stating 
"In the darkness of this hour our 
hearts cry out for an explanation." 
Rev. Murtland replied to the "Why?" 
with the scriptures' description of the 
last days of the Gentle Carpenter of 
Galilee. Predicting His rendezvous 
with Calvary the Saviour had said, 
"What I do thou knowest not now, but 
thou shalt know hereafter" (St. John 
13:8). 

His "Why?", namely, "My God, my 
God, why hast Thou forsaken me?", 
from the blood-soaked height of the 
cross has been answered as His ex- 
ample, His teachings, His ideals became 
clearer with the passing years. 

Alma Preinkert, throughout her life 
practicing what Jesus taught, was a 
good and great influence in service 
devoted to others. Her efforts toward 



the advancement of the University will 
remain in lasting recognition of the 
contribution of this gracious lady. Not 
unlike the example of the Master, 
lives such as her's are not in vain. 

The Diamondback, student news- 
paper, aptly reflected this fact with 
"Miss Alma is gone, but she will for- 
ever be alive in the annals of the Uni- 
versity and the hearts of her friends." 

University President Thos. B. 
Symons accorded high praise to the 
departed Registrar. In referring to her 
as "a magnificent person" Dr. Symons 
called Miss Preinkert a "very capable, 
efficient and friendly woman" whose 
reputation as a registrar was inter- 
national. 

"Miss Preinkert was in charge of 
registrations for 8,000 students in 80 
different parts of the world, in addi- 
tion to 13,000 or 14,000 here," Dr. 
Symons said. 

Handled 42,000 

Including extension students Miss 
Preinkert handled the records of some 
42,000 persons. 

"Even more important, she was in 
charge of keeping the grades of all 
these students — as you can see very 
important to keep accurately," Dr. 
Symons said. 

"A hard worker herself, Miss Prein- 
kert assembled a very efficient force, 
and all her employes loved her. The 
university has suffered a great loss." 

The 22 women who worked under her 
in the office of the registrar, called 
Miss Preinkert one of the best loved 
figures on the campus. 

"She worked right along with us 
and was extremely loyal to her job 
and to us," said Mrs. Norma Azlein, 
adding, "Miss Preinkert was one of 
those very friendly persons who went 
out of her way to make friends. When 
any one new came to the office or 
joined the staff, she went to visit them 
to introduce herself." 

Office parties, including the ones at 
Christmas time and showers for 
mothers-to-be and women leaving, al- 
ways were attended by Miss Preinkert, 
Mrs. Azlein said. 

They Never Forgot 

"The girls always came back to see 
her after they left and she always 
remembered them." Mrs. Azlein went 
on to say, "Her personal drive was 
terrific. Her energy was boundless. 
She could work circles around the 
youngest of us." 

Dr. Harold Cotter man, Dean of the 
Faculty, who knew Miss Preinkert 
when she began her career at Maryland 
as a stenographer in 1919, said "She 




Typical is this recent imposed picture of 
ilir late Alma IT. Preinkert, Registrar, Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 



came to take a 'job' and made a profes- 
sion of it. She stood high in the pro- 
fessional circles of registrars of the 
best universities in the country." 

A former vice-president of the 
American Association of College Regis- 
trars, Miss Preinkert was very very 
active in club work. She was president 
of the Maryland Federation of Women's 
Clubs, and in 1950 toured Europe with 
a group of clubwomen as a repre- 
sentative of the General Federation of 
Women's Clubs. 

She had earned a master of arts 
degree at Maryland and was about to 
complete work for her doctorate. 

Only a few nights before Alma's 
tragic death she had been one of the 
hostesses at a banquet of the American 
Association of University Professors, 
at which the featured speaker was Dr. 
Arthur S. Flemming, of President 
Eisenhower's Security Council. 

"Thoughtful Miss Preink" 

Mrs. Flemming (the former Bernice 
Virginia Moler) who, as a student, 
had worked in Miss Preinkert's office 
force said, "Thoughtful 'Miss Preink' 
was at the door when we left to say 
goodbye. She asked what route we 
planned to follow home to Washington. 
'Rhode Island Avenue,' I answered, 
'Don't go that way,' she urged. 'My car 



"Maryland' 



is just ahead of yours. You follow me. 
I'll lead you home.' 

"And so, my last sight of 'Miss 
Preink' becomes a choice memory, as 
I cherish the last words I was priv- 
ileged to hear her say, 'Follow me. 
I'll lead you home'." 

Yes, Alma Preinkert's entire life will 
serve to lead many others "home." 

The chapel was crowded to capacity 
for the funeral services. Among those 
who came to pay final respects were 
Governor and Mrs. McKeldin; Dr. H. C. 
Byrd, President Emeritus; Thos. B. 
Symons, president of the university, 
hundreds of faculty members, numer- 
i us .students and friends. 

Sunday School Teacher 
Rev. Murtland told his listeners Miss 
Preinkert would be remembered in 
Various ways by those who knew her — 
as a Sunday school teacher, as a 
counselor and friend at the university, 
and as a leader in civic and community 
activity. Rev. Otto Reimherr, Luthe- 
ran campus Chaplain, assisted in the 
services. 

Pallbearers were Charles Benton, 
director of finance and business; David 
Brigham, alumni secretary; Robert 
James, assistant dean of men; Thomas 
Mont, assistant football coach; George 
Weber, business manager, and Major 
Frank Tipton, U.S.A.F., assistant pro- 
fessor of air science and tactics. 

Judge William P. Cole, Jr., chairman, 
and B. Herbert Brown, represented the 
Board of Regents. The mourners in- 
cluded all of Maryland's Deans for 
both the College Park and Baltimore 
schools. 

The university choir sang the fourth 
movement of Brahms' "Requiem." An 
honor guard of Pershing Rifles, student 
honorary military society, formed an 
aisle through which the casket was 
borne from the chapel. 

Flags were at half mast as "Miss 
Preink" was escorted on her last trip 
across the campus she knew so well, 
to Glenwood Cemetery. 

Brutal Attack 
The brutal, vicious attack that ended 
the useful and youthful life of this 
gentle lady rivaled anything from the 
pen of Edgar Allen Poe. 

Miss Preinkert was asleep in her 
home when attacked by a burglar whom 
she obviously surprised while ransack- 
ing her room. 

Fearless as always, she screamed. 
The man, a cheap, vicious killing beast, 
attacked her with a knife, inflicting 
numerous mortal wounds. 

Miss Alma's sister, Miss Alvina, 
came to her aid and tackled the assail- 
ant from the rear. He turned on the 
sister and reportedly slashed her. 
Alma then turned on the light. That 
frightened the killer away. He ran 
down the hall and out of the back 
door, pursued by Miss Alvina. 

Thus, by turning on the light and 
causing the killer to flee, Alma, with 
almost her last gesture, crowned a life 
of service by saving her sister's life. 
Alma and Alvina, blood spattered 
from head to foot, then lurched toward 
their brother-in-law, Henry S. Heine, 
who, with his wife, Mrs. Margaret 
Heine, another sister, had responded 



to the cry, "Help! He's killing us!" 

Alma, after telling her sisters and 
brother-in-law goodbye, died in Mr. 
Heine's arms. Her last words Were 

"Hug me. Kiss me goodbye. 1 am dy- 
ing." 

So passed a splendid, good, God- 
fearing lady, in death as in life follow- 
ing the teachings of her faith. 

The funeral parlor and the chapel 
were piled high with floral tributes 
to a "girl from the heart of Maryland," 
who enjoyed the love and esteem of 
all who knew her. 

Nice things are said about most 
people after there're dead but everybody 
said nice things about Alma while she 
lived. 

For the University she loved she 
was a "team player" all out for the 
good of the school. She was a "gentle- 
man." 



Reunions 

Alumni of all branches of the Uni- 
versity are scheduled for banquets, 
reunions and special functions. Most 
will take place during the first week 
in June. Notices are going forward 
to Law School graduates for a banquet 
on May 8, in Baltimore. The Home 
Ec Day is on tap for May 15, Pharmacy 
alumni will assemble for their annual 
banquet on June 3rd, Medicine cele- 
brates on June 3, also and the Dental 
and Nursing groups will gather for 
June 4. 

For the College Park Schools in- 
cluding Agriculture, Arts & Sciences, 
Business & Public Administration, 
Education, Engineering,, Home Eco- 
nomics, Military Science and Physical 
Education, Recreation and Health, 
there will be business meetings with 
elections, tours of the campus, an 
evening banquet and special reunions 
during the afternoon. 

While all alumni are both urged and 
cordially invited to attend a major ef- 
fort will be made to bring back mem- 
bers of the fifty year class of 1904, the 
forty-five year class of 1909, the forty 
year class of 1914, the thirty-five year 
class of 1919, the thirty year class 
of 1924, the silver aniversary group 
of 1929, and the twenty year alumni 
of 1934. There will also be attention 
directed to bringing back those of the 
more recent classes of 1939, 1944 and 
1949. 

Detailed announcements which are 
to follow this writing will give the 
specific information concerning all 
plans for all alumni. If they have not 
arrived before this news reaches you, 
watch for them. Your classmates, 
schoolmates, and old friends want to 
see you again. Bring your family and 
enjoy yourself on your day. No other 
activity could give you more pleasure 
or profit. 

****** 
DEFINITION 

An alumnus is a person who has been 
exposed to the benign and stimulating 
teachings of his college or university, 
and who continues to reflect its influ- 
ence throughout hid life. (University 
of Chicago) 



Human Relations 

The first annual llu 

( tanference in 1 1 • of the I 

i!y of Mm) land 
the Student Religioui Council end I 
place at Prince William Fon 
in Triangle, Virginia. The Confei 

was presented in Conjunction with 

Rabbi Edward L. Israel [1 

Award of the Maryland and Distrl 
Columbia Association of H'nai I'.'rith 

Lodges, of which Albert I. Goldberg 

of Baltimore is president and Hi 
C. Wechsler of Washington is Ifillel 
chairman. 

The purpose of the weekend confer- 
ence was to create better understanding 

among members of the various religi- 
ous groups on campus, to study the 
problems which arise in the relations 
between religious groups, particularly 
at the college level, and to develop a 
program of cooperative action to be 
undertaken under the aegis of the 
Student Religious Council In the future. 

The members of the faculty of the 
conference included Dr. Earl Adams, 
Washington representative, National 
Council of Churches of Christ in 
America, Dr. Allyn P. Robinson, Direc- 
tor, Commision on Religious Organi- 
zations, National Conference of Chris- 
tians and Jews, and Rabbi Solomon 
Metz, Dean of the Washington College 
of Jewish Studies. 

Consultants and discussion leaders 
were Reverend William Beal; Profes- 
sor John A. Daiker, Chairman, Religi- 
ous Life Committee of the University; 
Miss Ruth Engelbrecht; Mrs. Patricia 
West Futch; Rabbi Meyer Greenberg; 
Mr. Phillip E. Lerman, Anti-Defama- 
tion League of B'nai B'rith; Miss Ann 
Lewis; Reverend Jesse W. Meyers; Mr. 
Howard Rees; and Reverend Otto 
Reimherr. 

Session of the conference will be 
devoted to the following topics: "Ques- 
tions Students Ask on Judaism," 
"Questions Students Ask on Christian- 
ity," "Problems of Intergroup Rela- 
tions Resulting from Theological Differ- 
ences," Problems in the Area of 
Marriage and Intermarriage," and 
"Areas of Mutual Cooperation on the 
Campus. 

To South America 

Dean S. S. Steinberg of the College 
of Engineering, and Dr. J. M. Gwin, 
Director of Extension, visited British 
Guiana, Dutch Guiana, Trinidad, Puerto 
Rico, and Jamaica, for the Foreign 
Operations Administration. They made 
an inspection to determine how these 
governments might be aided in im- 
proving their agriculture, education, 
and engineering. 

Food Fair Scholarships 

The Food Fair Stores Foundation 
of Philadelphia established four J 
scholarships to the University. 

These are one year scholarships for 
both men or women who pursue any 
freshman course. Candidates from any 
accredited public or Catholic high 
schools are eligible. 



"Maryland" 



Our Blessings Worth Defending 

Major General Milton A. Reckord, Maryland Day Convo- 
cation Speaker, Stresses Values Of American Way 
Of Life As Worth The Sacrifices Involved. 




aj. Gen. Milton 
_A. Reckord, 
Adjutant General of 
Maryland since 1920 
was the 
guest speak- 
er at the 
Maryland 
Day Spring 
Convocation, 
held in the 
Coliseum at 
College Park. 
A feature of the program, com- 
memorating the founding of the Free 
State, March 25, 1634, was the presen- 
tation to the University hy General 
Reckord of a portrait of Captain John 
Reckord. 

A nephew of General Reckord lost 
his life while serving with the U.S. 
fourth division in Franre. 
Class Of '41 
John G. Reckord graduated from 
the University of Maryland College 
of Arts & Sciences in 1941. He was a 
member of Kappa Alpha Fraternity, 
a president of the Student Government 
Association, Colonel of the ROTC, 
Captain of Pershing Rifles and a mem- 
ber of Scabbard and Blade. Captain 
Reckord was killed in action in Nor- 
mandy, June 23, 1944. 

The portrait of Captain Reckord 
was painted by James P. Wharton, 
head of the University's art depart- 
ment. 

President Thos B. Symons accepted 
the portrait for the University. 

"Three hundred and twenty years 
ago (on March 25th, 1634) the Ark 
and Dove landed at St. Clement's 
Island in Maryland, and two days later 
sailed into St. Mary's River and the 
banner of religious liberty was planted 
upon our soil," said General Reckord. 
Enjoyed Freedom 
"Although there were short periods 
of time during which the citizens of 
Maryland disagreed among themselves, 
it can be said with truth that for more 
than three hundred years they have 
enjoyed freedom of conscience — the 
ripht to worship God as they saw fit. 
The Toleration Act was passed by the 
General Assembly at St. Mary's on 
April 2, 1649, and from that date Mary- 
land has been known throughtout the 
world as the haven of oppressed people, 
and such have been welcomed to our 
shores," he continued. 

"We have a great heritage, an in- 
heritance that has been handed down 
through the past three hundred years. 
Freedom does not grow on trees, it 
descends like manna from heaven. It 
is the work of informed and devoted 
minds," General Reckord went on to 
say. 

"Since the early days of the colony, 
Maryland has figured prominently in 



our national history," the speaker con- 
tinued, "and we were one of the 
strong supporters of the revolution and 
contributed much more than our share 
toward that victory. At the end of the 
Revolutionary War, General Washing- 
ton resigned his commission in the 
senate chamber of the Capitol at 
Annapolis. Shortly thereafter the dele- 
gates of several states met in Anna- 
polis to plan the Philadelphia Confer- 
ence over which General Washington 
presided, and at which the Constitution 
of the United States was adopted." 

A Beautiful State 

"The beautiful mountains and broad 
acres, an the glorious Chesapeake be- 
long to YOU! The life of freeom and 
contentment which you are privileged 
to live in Maryland is above and be- 
yond anything enjoyed by any other 
people in any other nation in the 
world!," General Reckord went on to 
say, asking, 

"Is this American way of life worth 
while? Is it worth saving that we 
may pass it on to those who follow us ? 
I think it is. What are we going to do 
about it? Just relax and take it for 
granted ? No, if we are worthy citizens 
we must be prepared to protect and 
defend the privileges we enjoy. Home 
is the citadel of that freedom which is 
America. It was the threat to our 
homes and homelife which prompted 
our boys to go forth and defeat agres- 
sor nations. It was the thought of home 
and loved ones which sparked the 
brave feats on the Normandy beaches, 
Cherbourg, St. Lo, and Bastogne. For 
we are a home-loving as well as a 
peace-loving people, and to preserve 
the American way of life we cherish, 
we have been prepared to make any 
sacrifice!" 

No Place For Apathy 

"It is strangely paradoxical," the 
speaker continued, "That much good 
springs out of such a hateful thing 
as war. Seeing men die for prin- 
ciples they hold dear is bound to evoke 
a feeling of humility in those who 
survive, for the events of war are 
sobering, and from its rigors the 
soldier is taught common sense and 
true values. Apathy and smugness 
have no place in the character of the 
fighting man. He must be alert, 
aggressive and ingenuous if he is to 
conquer the enemy — or even survive." 

"The day when we can remain apa- 
thetic to events in the world about us 
has passed. Short-sighted indulgence 
in pleasure and material comforts must 
give way to long-range planning for 
the maintenance of peace," General 
Reckord said, warning, "Hold no illu- 
sions as to the ability of the United 
States to emerge unscathed from an- 
other onslaught. Oceans can no longer 
be counted upon to spare our cities 



from destruction. The turtle basking 
in pleasure neath the sun's rays merely 
pulls in his neck at the approach of 
trouble. Our nation can no longer 
afford a similar course. We must hence- 
forth pay full heed to the rumblings 
in Europe and the Orient." 

"We are one of the most powerful 
nations in the world. We belong to a 
world community. The thoughtful 
citizen knows all advocates of isolation- 
ism are unsound. He knows that solely 
for pleasure and self-indulgence is not 
the cornerstone upon which the home- 
life he loves is built. He knows that 
freedom and security demand sacrifices 
of us all. He knows that if world co- 
operation is to be successful, a spirit of 
give and take must prevail among the 
members nations. He is aware that 
some self-interested nation might de- 
part from the principles of fair play so 
clear to us, unless we continue to exert 
the same alertness and vigilance in 
the post-war years as are demanded 
of the fighting man in battle," the 
General went on to say, 

Must Lead In Peace 

"A leader in war, we must be a 
leader in peace," the speaker con- 
tinued, "If we are to enjoy our homes, 
our freedom, and our security. This 
is a most ambitious task and for its 
accomplishment we must speak the 
language the world understands. Until 
that ideal day when the nations of 
the world are so thoroughly imbued 
with the principles of peace that war 
is out of the question, we must main- 
tain the power to back up our com- 
mitments. This means an active force 
— Army, Navy, and air, sufficient to 
guarantee that when we speak the 
world will listen and, through co- 
operative action on the part of all 
member nations, achieve a peaceful 
solution of all problems. During the 
immediate post-war era we cannot 
afford to render ourselves impotent. 
American principles of sportsmanship 
are not yet everywhere understood. 
We must point the way to their attain- 
ment with a firm and powerful hand." 

Making Progress 

"Because of the attitude of commu- 
nist Russia," Gen. Reckord cited, "We 
are sometimes prone to feel that little 
or no progress toward a lasting peace 
is being made in the United Nations 
assembly. Nothwithstanding the diffi- 
culties which face us at the moment 
because of the arbitrary attitude of 
Russia, I am of the opinion progress 
is being made and we are warranted in 
giving our earnest and undivided sup- 
port to this effort. The United Nations 
is a world sounding board even though 
progress seems to be slow, the free 
people of the world will undoubtedly 
realize the continued effort in their 
defense. The people who are behind 
the Iron curtain will know that they 
have not been foresaken." 

"We know we have won the wars," 
the speaker said, " but we still must 
win the peace! We must not again fall 
prey to wishful thinking and believe 
that there is nothing more for us to 
do. Let us make a firm resolve to de- 



"MorylMuT 



vote our every thought and action, now 
that the wars are behind us, to the all- 
important task of leading the United 
Nations in their effort to profit by the 
mistakes of the past. Let us not shrink 
at the mention of world collaboration. 
.Just as we in America adjusted our- 
selves following,- the civil war, now the 
nations of the world must adjust them- 
selves. Let us not allow our desire for 
ease of living to ever again commit us 
to shortsighted policies. But let us im- 
press our will firmly in the minds of 
our chosen representatives so that 
every possible step will be taken to 
guarantee the outlawry of war for- 
ever. For such a millenium is not 
imposible of achievement. To so state 
would be the height of defeatism. The 
constructive results already obtained 
conclusively show that such an objec- 
tive is not illusory, but that real 
world concord and solidarity are pos- 
sible of accomplishment." 

The career infantry man told the 
assembly, particularly the ROTC men, 
"We cannot afford to render ourselves 
impotent. We must maintain the power 
to back up our commitments with 
sufficient military power." 

"I am one of those who believes that 
the President of the United States took 
the proper step forward when he told 
the world, through the UN, that we 
desired peace, but if any aggressor 
started another war, that aggresor, 
rather than its satellites, would feel 
the burden of our fist." 

All Should Serve 

"We can secure the peace and de- 
fense of America best by having every 
young man in the nation take basic 
military training," the general de- 
clared. 

If every physically able man in the 
nation had such training, he added, 
veterans would not have to be recalled 
to fight again, as was the case in the 
early days of the Korean incident. 

"No man should be required to serve 
in battle twice when the boy who lives 
next door has never been out of his 
home town," the speaker emphasized. 

"We must have sufficient faith in 
God, and faith in man, to know that 
through their works the world shall be 
able to enjoy the blessings of everlast- 
ing peace, These blesings are not to be 
lightly won. We must show through 
our actions and sacrifices that we 
dearly prize them and only then will 
these blessings be our just reward. Only 
then will we, the living, justify the 
sacrifices made by our comrades on 
battlefields throughout the world," 
General Reckord concluded. 

Welcomed By Dr. Symons 

Dr. T. B. Symons formally welcomed 
the audience in his opening remarks. 

Dr. Symons said he had received 
"the greatest cooperation in my at- 
tempt to serve the University during 
this critical period." 

"I have decided," he said "that the 
best humble service I can render while 



serving as your acting president will 
be to do a good housekeeping 
Dean Smith, Presiding 
Included in the program, over which 
Dean Leon 1'. Smith, of the College 
of Aits and Sciences, presided, were 
selections by the chapel choir, under 

the direct ion of Faguc Springman, 
associate professor of music Selec- 
tions included "Gloria" from Mozait'- 

"Twelfth Mass' and "Recesional" by 

DeKoven. Soloist for the group was 
Master Sergeant Ivan Genuchi, music 
education major and a member of the 
U.S. Air Force Hand's Singing Ser- 
geants. 

Invocation was given by the Rev. 
William A. Heal. Father P.J, Kennedy 
gave the benediction. 



Thanks To All 

Dr. H. C. Byrd, President Emeritus 
of the University, addressed a 
letter to Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, Presi- 
dent of the Alumni Association ex- 
pressing the deep appreciation by the 
leader who for so many years de- 
voted his life to the University of 
Maryland and its development. Refer- 
ence is made, of course, to the Testi- 
monial Dinner presented by the Alumni 
Association. 

"This afternoon," wrote Dr. Byrd, 
"I found on my desk the beautifully 
bound book of testimonial letters that 
the Alumni presented me. This reminds 
me that I have not 
written a formal 
thank you note for 
the many honors 
that the Alumni be- 
stowed upon me at 
the dinner in De- 
cember. 

"It is almost need- 
less for me to re- 
peat in writing," 
Dr. Byrd's letter 
continued, ''what I 
have said hundreds 
of times in words to you and others, 
but I cannot resist longer the tempta- 
tion to put down in black 'and white 
my deep appreciation of that dinner in 
Baltimore. It was the highlight of my 
whole life. Presentation of the flowers 
to my daughter, Evalyn, letting my lit- 
tle granddaughter unveil the portrait; 
the presentation of an automobile; and 
the many kind things that were said 
by you, To] Speer, Father Bunn, and 
all those who spoke, gave 'me a thrill 
such as I never expect to have again, 
no matter what the circumstances. 

"I want you to know this and I hope 
you will call it to the attention of the 
Alumni Council, and, if you will, print 
this letter in 'Maryland,' the Alumni 
Magazine," Dr. Byrd went on to say. 

"While 1 shall, before long, retire 
from the University," Dr. Byrd con- 
cluded, " you may rest assured that I 
will alwa<ys work for it. With best 
wishes and my eternal gratitude." 



Appreciation 




Dr. Byrd 



The Adn.ini itrst • Board of the 

I 'Diversity , headed by Acting I 
dent Thomas I!- Sj mom, and ■ i 

of l- !'• of |).-, 

incuts, adopted s resolution of appre 
ciation of Dr. ll. c. Byrd, President 
Emeritus, which read 

"WHEREAS, Dr. II. C. Byrd 
deemed it wise to retire sa president 
of the University of Maryland ss of 

January J, 1964, and 

"\\ ll l RE \s. he ha- devoted bo much 
of his life to the Universit) lerving 

as an instructor, director of atb 

letics, assistant to the president, 

vice-president, and for the last sev- 
enteen years as president with such 
outstanding beneficial results to the 
institution, and 

"WHEREAS, the members of this Ad- 
ministrative Hoard have worked 
closely with him in these educational 
developments. 

"BE IT RESOLVED, that, we of the 
Administrative Board formally ex- 
press by this resolution our admira- 
tion for his accomplishments, our ap- 
preciation of the developmental op- 
portunities which his vision pro- 
jected, our affection for him as an 
individual, and our best wishes for 
a constructive, fruitful life for him 
in the years ahead. 

"BE IT RESOLVED further, that, Dr. 
Byrd be formally appraised of this 
resolution by the secretary of this 
body and that the resolution become 
a part of its regular proceedings." 



Books Wanted 

Alumni Requested To Send 
Books For Student Library. 

The Student Union Building is near- 
ing completion and should open in 
June. 

One of the features of this beautiful 
building is a browsing library for use 
of the entire student body and the Stu- 
dent Union Committee is working to 
secure book- tor this library. 1 he 
Commitee needs alumni help. 

The library will contain all types of 
light reading material such as biog- 
raphies, novels, poetry, short stories, 
books about sports, etc. If you have 
any of these books collecting dust at 
your home, please donate them to the 
University. 

Books may be mailed to or left at 
the Kappa Kappa Gamma house. South 
Sylvester Hall or the Rec Hall. If you 
wish to have large donations picked up 
at your home, contact Jackie Purnell 
or Mary Anne Evans at the Kappa 
Kappa Gamma house. Monetary con 
tributions will be gratefully accepted 
also. 

This is a very worthy cause deserv- 
ing of whole-hearted support. 



"Maryland" 




Sue Aitken, Home Economics sophomore, 
Kappa Delt, in the center of the front rote, 
was chosen "Queen of the Sophomore Prom" 
from the above pictured group of girls from 
the heart of Maryland. Shirley Ann Mathews, 
second from the left in the second row was 
runner-up with Joy Cosgrove, second from the 
left in the front row, in third place. 

Pictured above, left to right, front row : 
Betty Ann Brown, Joy Cosgrove, Sue Aitken, 
Betty DeMello, and Carmen Ebandjieff. Cen- 
ter (senated) row : Carol Zies, Shirley Ann 
Matthews, Renee Marcus, Trenna. Emery, Car- 
oline Cooper, Betty Larsen, Rita Rogers, and 
Joan Mathews. 

Back (.standing) row : Sally Strott, Donna 
Cochenour, Anne Thompson, Ann Latimer, 



BEVY OF BEAUTY 

Sally Miller, and Sylvia Snyder. 

Miss Aitken reigned at the annual sopho- 
more class prom. 

An estimated 1400 people swayed to the 
rhythms of Tommy Tucker and his orches- 
tra. During intermissions, the Dixieland out- 
fit of local bandleader Tiny Meeker put the 
happy crowd into a mood to match the carni- 
val-like atmosphere of the gaily bedecked 
Armory, decorated in the festival setting of 
the New Orleans Mardi Oras, with large 
multi-colored lampposts, balloons and stream- 
ers. 

Halfway through the dance, prom chairman 
Tom Strassner greeted the crowd from a 
carousel like platform in the center of the 
floor. Everyone pressed in for a closer look 



as he presented the candidates for queen one 
by one. 

Then, as the orchestra played "Bouquet of 
Roses" in the background, Ed Speer crowned 
Sue Aitken, who was flanked by her court, 
Shirley Matthews and Joy Cosgrove, the sec- 
ond and third place. 

After being crowned and presented with a 
bouquet, the queen led the couples in the next 
dance. 

Miss Aitken was chosen from a group of 
very beautiful girls representing the various 
dormitories and sororities, by a board of 
judges consisting of Oeary F. Eppley, dean 
of men; John Rice, president of the inter- 
fraternity council; and Joan Rally, a model 
from the Phyllis Bell Modeling Agency in 
Washington. 



Dr. Flemming Speaks 

Dr. Arthur S. Flemming, Director of 
Defense Mobilization and a member of 
President Eisenhower's Security Coun- 
cil, addressed the Maryland Chapter 
of the American Association of Uni- 
versity Professors at a buffet dinner 
in the University's Dining Hall. 

Dr. Flemming is well known in the 
educational circles as President of Ohio 
Wesleyan University, from which he is 
now on leave. 

In addition, Dr. Flemming was also 
professor of economics at American 
University in Washington for a num- 
ber of years. 

Dr. Flemming is rated as one of the 
six most powerful men in the general 
management of the U.S. government. 

The President's National Security 
council consists of Cabinet secretaries 
Dulles, Humphrey and Wilson, Vice- 



president Nixon and foreign operations 
administrator Stassen, and Dr. Flem- 
ming. 

Dr. Flemming stated that the faculty 
should have a bigger voice in the policy- 
making of the administration. 

He also said the student should be 
given "a feeling of being more than a 
spectator." 

"The principle of consultative man- 
agement," he said, should be used in 







the operation of an institution of 
learning, giving faculty, administration 
and trustees a share in policy making. 

He cited the Eisenhower administra- 
tion a "a good example of this prin- 
ciple in action." 

When the principle is followed, the 
"lines of demarcation between faculty, 
administration and board of trustees 
begin to disappear," Dr. Flemming 
went on to say. 

Introduced by Dr. Dorothy Deach, 
head of the women's physical education 
department, Flemming stressed the 
need for well denned objectives. "Un- 
less the main objectives are clearly 
denned, the detailed actions will be 
vague and ineffective," he stressed. 

"The advice of faculty, administra- 
tion, and board of trustees is needed 
for nearly all decisions," Flemming 
said. 



"Maryland" 



Tracking Down An Island Killer 



Lieutenant Leslie Teller, U.S. Navy, University of Maryland 

Graduate, Renders Outstanding Service As Andetymologist 

On Remote Japanese Islands 



Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, U. S. 
Navy, Commanding- U. S. Naval 
Forces in the Pacific during World War 
II, said, upon termination of hostili- 
ties, "The most effective weapon we 
imposed upon the enemy was EDU- 
CATION." 

Education always pays off. It pays 
off in war and, what is also very im- 
portant, it pays off in peace. Here 
is a story of a Maryland graduate 
who, under primitive conditions, ren- 
dered outstanding service in bringing 
a education and a better chance for life 
to the natives of remote Japanese is- 
lands. 

Iriomote and Ishigaki were meaning- 
less names of two Japanese islands to 
Lieutenant Leslie Teller U. S. Navy, 
B.S. (Agriculture '42) and Ph.D. in 
1951, University of Maryland, before 
he was sent from his unit, to 3rd 
Marine Division, in Japan, to track 
down a killer. 

Deep Jungles 

The jungles of these islands rival 
those of New Guinea and the Philip- 
pines. The climate is alternately wet 
and windy. Mountains pock their land- 
scape, while "dry" typhoons periodi- 
cally buckle their trees and houses. 
Wild boar and poisonous habu snakes 
roam, and strike, at leisure. 

Despite overpopulation, people are 
at a premium. The mortality rate 
for infants sometimes soars as high 
30 percent. The mixed population of 
Chinese, Ryukyuan, Japanese, and Fili- 
pino approximately 50,000 and is sea- 
sonally decimated by Plasmodium fal- 
ciparnum, a mosquito that carries the 
most fatal malignant strain of ma- 
laria. 

It was a combination of these two 
factors (an absence of people to culti- 
vate the abundant agricultural areas, 
and a mosquito that kills off the hired 
hands before they can harvest their 
first crop) that prompted the Ryuk- 
yuan civil authorities to request aid 
from the U. S. Armed Forces. 

Reached 3rd Mar. Div. 

Recommendations were needed; the 
demand for medical assistance was 
critical. If suitable precautions could 
be taken, perhaps workers in over- 
crowded islands like Okinawa would 
migrate to Iriomote and Ishigaki. 

The call for help reached as far 
up as the 3rd Marine Division. Lieu- 
tenant Teller, andetymologist with the 
third Marine Division's Preventive 
Medicine Dept., was ordered to join a 
six-man team to lend whatever aid 
they could. 

The assignment took slightly less 
than one month; two weeks of which 
were spent touring a dozen of the is- 



lands' communities, taking 1600 blood 
smears, and probing numerous mo- 
squito breeding places. 

In between .scientific investigations 
the small party endured rainy, sun- 
less weather, piloted itself through 
shallow waters studded with razor- 
sharp coral reefs, sampled the stiffest 
sake this side of Honshu, lived on 
"C" rations and island water heavily 
"seasoned" with halazone tablets, and 
learned a first-hand lesson in stark- 
plain living. 

No Doctors 

There were no doctors on Iriomote, 
only a few on the larger Ishigaki. 
There was no evidence of missionaries, 
Lieutenant Teller said, and electricity 
was a rare luxury, confined primarily 
to a tiny corps of service personnel 
pulling a regular two-year tour of 
duty there. 

But everywhere they went the Amer- 
icans were greeted by the natives as 
friends and, because many had never 
before seen Yanks, as oddities. Gongs 
fashioned from large Japanese artil- 
lery shells left behind on the islands' 
three unusable air strips, sounded as- 
sembly whenever the medical group 
appeared. The natives knew that the 
white-skinned men in utilities were 
trying to help them live. 

Immediate help will come in the form 
of medicines like chloroquin, a post- 
war marvel considered to be the most 
effective means of aiding malaria vic- 
tims, and the old equalizer, DDT, 
which will be sprayed on houses and 
farms. 

Lieutenant Teller explained that be- 
cause of the cold climatic conditions 
it was impossible to forecast at the 
time the malaria potential for the 
coming season. But extensive labora- 
tory investigation is now being con- 
ducted on the blood smears and mo- 
squito specimens so that additional 
precautions can be taken. 

Rugged Reefs 

Whatever the beneficial outcome, 
Ishigaki and Iriomote probably won't 
become booming metropolises. Rugged 
reefs make admission for large ships 
practically impossible. Any market 
surplus will just have to be absorbed 
within the islands themselves. 

But one thing's for certain, a pio- 
neer-type of people are being given 
a little more chance of life without 
fear because a more fortunate group 
of four men learned of their plight 
and decided to do something about it. 

After the team completed their at- 
tack on the mosquitos, Lieutenant 
Teller returned to Camp Gifu where 
he resumed his duties as a Division 
sanitation officer specializing in insect 
and rodent control. 




DOES GREAT JOB 

Lieutenant L. W. Teller, U.S. Navy, Mary- 
land alumnus, highly lauded for humanitarian 
island services. 



His next assignment is for Iwo Jima 
with the malaria team. 

Lieutenant Teller's wife is Miriam 
Ruth Teller and three children, Rob- 
ert, 9, Harold, 7, and Ann, 2% of 1105 
Mourilee Lane, Silver Spring, Mary- 
land. 



Alphi 



w Xi Delta 

Dean of Women Adele H. Stamp, 
lighted the fire which burned the mort- 
gage of the handsome colonial chapter 
house of Alpha Xi Delta sorority on 
Knox Road, College Park. 

This meant that the chapter house, 
built in 1937, is free of debt. The 
property with its 
handsome furnish- 
ings is worth about 
$ 1 0, 0. Miss 
Stamp was the lead- 
ing spirit in the 
founding of the 
chapter with 24 
girls as charter 
members in 1934. 
Alpha Xi Delta 
r held the Panhellenic 
L' /* scholarship cup for 
Dean Stamp t w o consecutive 

years 1942-43, and 1943-44, and has 
won the national achievement award 
for excellence of chapter management. 
The sorority's national projects are 
sponsorship of rural schools in this 
country, and providing scholarships 
for graduate study for Dutch students. 
The Maryland chapter has led the 
Alpha Xi Delta college chapter roll 
eight times for top contributions to 
the National Philanthropy Fund. 




"Maryland" 



"Live and Help Live" 

The University of Maryland Television Educational 
Program On Station WBAL 



By ZLfoketk A. GovtoU 

Many education institutions have 
been considering the possibility 
ilishing programs on TV fre- 
cies allocated for purely educa- 
a) purposes. The University of 
\ land has been of the opinion that 
the plan to be preferred is to continue 
utilizing public service time, which is 
a ,- must" contribution of commercial 
stations, demanded by the Interstate 
Communications Commission. 

Very Active 

WBAL in Baltimore, under the guid- 
ance of Mr. Delancy Provost, has been 
most active in this field, and has ac- 
complished an unusual success under 
the direction of Mrs. Anne Holland. 
As a part of this public service, Mrs. 
Holland contacted the medical school 
through Doctor John C. Krantz, Jr., 
Professor of Pharmacology, in the Fall 
of 1951, and as a result of this, a 
very successful series of weekly pro- 
grams entitled "Live and Help Live" 
was established, and the content of 
the individual presentations has been 
designed to fit into this framework. 
The University of Maryland and Sta- 
tion WBAL-TV have been signally 
successful. 

Because of the rapid increase in pub- 
lic acceptance, it became apparent that 
a more formal administrative control 
must be established; consequently, 
upon advice from the Faculty Advis- 
ory Board, the Dean of the Medical 
School appointed a Television Com- 



mittee to consider all aspects of the 
matter. The Committee recommended 
that this activity be placed under the 
Postgraduate Committee of the Medi- 
cal School insofar as that School was 
concerned, and this was done by the 
Dean and the Faculty Advisory Board 
on April 17, 1952. 

The vast majority of the presenta- 
tions have been on medical subjects 
and the programs have been designed 
for lay audiences. The subjects dis- 
cussed have been carefully selected, 
the method of presentation having been 
kept upon a level acceptable to non- 
medical listeners. Frankness has pre- 
vailed, but not a single program has 
been met by objection on the part of 
the public because of the subject mat- 
ter discussed. Emphasis has been laid 
upon achieving an optimistic note, 
stressing the fact that most conditions 
can be controlled if adequate medical 
care is made available early enough in 
the disease or condition. Public ac- 
ceptance has been excellent, and at 
times, almost phenomenal as evidenced 
by the various ratings used to evaluate 
the popularity of TV programs. 

Bronchical Asthma 

As an example of the type of pro- 
gram given, on January 18, 1954, the 
subject of bronchial asthma, which is 
a common and a disabling condition, 
when improperly handled, was dis- 
cussed. Doctor Howar M. Bubert, Chief 
of the Section of Allergy of the De- 
partment of Medicine of our medical 
school, was responsible for the pro- 
gram and was assisted by Mrs. Jo Anne 





ON WBAL 

Dr. Howard if. Hubert, Chief of the Sec- 
tion of Allergy, School of Medicine, discusses 
bronchial asthma on the program "Live and 
Help Live." 



Conway, technician in the allergy 
clinic of our University Hospital in 
Baltimore. The presentation consisted 
of a discussion of the frequency of 
this condition, its disabling nature, 
methods of diagnosis of the condition 
and of the factors causing it, and in- 
cluded a demonstration of skin test- 
ing, an important diagnostic procedure 
in allergy. Several patients were pres- 
ent in the studio so that they might 
confirm the value of proper allergic 
care in persons exhibiting this severely 
disabling disease. 

The Postgraduate Committee of the 
medical school, being responsible for 
this phase of the University's work, 
trusts and expects that these presenta- 
tions can be continued for a long time, 
and that they will continue also to be 
of great value to the citizens of the 
State and to the University. 



DEMONSTRATING SKIN TEST ON TV 

Mrs. ,/o Anne Oonway, technician in the. Allergy Clinic. University Hospital, shows technique, 
used in skin test for bronchial asthma. 



Prince George's Club 

Alumni of the Prince George's Club 
enjoyed a joint social and business 
meeting in the campus recreation 
center on March 20. Ellwood R. 
Nicholas '28, of College Park was 
elected president and William Kahler 
'48 was elected Vice-President. Mrs. 
Adrienne Howard '36 is the new Secre- 
tary and Frank M. Claggett '52 will 
continue as treasurer. 

The new board of directors is com- 
posed of Miss E. Louise Sudlow '50, 
Mrs. Frieda Stahl '52, Mrs. Barbara 
Brown, '49, William Hoff '49 and Dr. 
James W. McCarl '24. 

Mark M. Shoemaker, landscape archi- 
tect, for the University, presented 
colored slides on the development of 
the University in the past 25 years 
with a highly interesting narrative of 
the tribulations involved. 

Bill Hotf, presented his young 
daughter Carol Ann, in an accordian 
solo. The group was also privileged to 
hear Fred Moehle, a student with a 
real professional touch on the ac- 
cordian. 



"Maryland" 



Industry Publication 

National Association of 
Manufacturers Publishes 
"This We Believe About 
Education" 

The National Association of Maim 
facturers has released the findings 
of a special committee of educators 
and industrialists who for two years 
have been studying major controver- 
sial issues relating- to education in 
the United States. 

The findings are to be published in 
a 32-page report, "This We Believe 
About Education." 

The study covers such vigorously 
debated subjects as the basic purposes 
of education, the rights of teachers, 
objective teaching vs. indoctrination, 
academic freedom, and the investiga- 
tion of charges against schools and 
educators. 

Controversial Questions 

The NAM committee, which included 
Richard H. Turk, President, Pemco 
Corporation, Baltimore, said it hoped 
the report will be a "useful guide" 
to both individuals and organizations 
in resolving conflicts and misunder- 
standings. 

The committee reported its conclu- 
sion in 11 broad "areas of agreement" 
in a series of short statements under 
the heading, "This we believe about, 
education." Included was one which 
dealt with broad indictments of school 
systems and educational leaders which 
said: 

"Businesmen, the public, and educa- 
tors should view with proper and cus- 
tomary caution sweeping charges made 
by any group which studies the edu- 
cational system and publishes adverse 
findings as to its methods, purposes, 
or practices, or as to the ideological 
loyalties of some of its leaders. 

"But smearing the groups or the 
individuals responsible for such criti- 
cisms is not satisfactory refutation 
of their evidence or of their arguments. 
Charges which cannot be substantiated 
should be refuted." 

Useful Guide 

Conclusions on other controversial 
questions were summarized similarly 
in two-paragraph statements — with 
the first paragraph representing the 
more liberal viewpoints and the second 
paragraph setting forth the more con- 
servative opinions within the commit- 
tee. The report emphasized that the 
division of opinion, however, was not 
between educators and industrialists 
but rather within each of the groups. 

On the subject of community vs. 
government responsibility for educa- 
tion, the committee said: "Constitu- 
tionally, public education is a function 
of the several states and statewide 
legislation establishing minimum 
standards of attendance, minimum ed- 
ucational standards, requirements for 




Paul /'. Oausey Mn. Anne Holland \n.ss Oarol bane B t Cunningham 
ON "LIVE AND HELP LIVE" PROGRAM 

One of the major contributions to highway safety was on elaboraU ' nlvertity of Mainland 
iiii- and Help Live" show presented '<// w'HM, i\ Moderator inni Holland assembled an 
impressive array of guests to book »/> the program's met ■ Blow, Danger Iheai," 

slanted directly at motorists in a holiday mood. 

One of the principle contributors to the program's purpose was Wist Oarol Lane of t'hirago, 
author, lecturer, traveller and generally recognised as iiii ewpert on tii< % nation's highways. 
Accompanying her Mr. Causey, Division Manager of Public Relations and Advertising for the 
Shell Oil Company, and Mr. Cunningham , Division Manager for the same firm. 

O-uests from the Maryland scene included Dr. Howard Hubert of the ' niversity of Mary- 
land, Paul Burke, chief of the Maryland Traffic Safety Commission ; Huston Ridgely of the 
Maryland State Police: Frank Bennett of the Department of Education: Richard Hartman of 
the Automobile Club of Maryland; Joseph Caskie, chief probation officer of the "/ crn-Age 
Traffic Court," and a student nurse and a resident intern from the University of .Maryland's 
Accident Jioom. 



facilities, and the pattern of local ad- 
ministration within certain limits of 
authority and responsibility is neces- 
sary and proper. 

"But community responsibility, com- 
munity administration, and community 
determination of matters concerning 
local school system should not be 
weakened by centralization of either 
facilities or control beyond actual re- 
quirements for the most efficient and 
economical education service in a given 
area. A thousand errors of policy or 
practice, however gross some of these 
errors may be, all tend to cancel each 
other out in time; and America has 
gained tremendously by this right of 
small groups to make progress in all 
fields of social effort by separate 
methods of trial and errors." Robert 
H. W. Welch, Jr., of Cambridge, Mass., 
chairman of the NAM's Educational 
Advisory Committee, which, with the 
NAM's Educational Advisory Council, 
directed the study conducted by a spe- 
cial subcommittee composed equally of 
educators and industrialists, said in a 
foreward to the report: 

Conscientiously Prepared 

"It is hoped that this effort will be 
received by both industrialists and ed- 
ucators in the spirit of tolerant good 
will in which it was conceived and in 
which it was conscientiously prepared." 
Walter D. Fuller, Chairman of the 
Board, Curtis Publishing Company, is 
a member of the NAM Educational Ad- 
visory Committee. 

Dr. F. Kenneth Brasted, director of 
the association's Education Depart- 
ment, added that the statement should 
prove a "useful tool" to everyone con- 
cerned in advancing education in the 
United States. 

The NAM said in releasing the re- 
port that it was "not presented as an 
official policy position of any educa- 
tional, business, or industrial associa- 



tion" and that it was published by the 
NAM "as a public service in the inter- 
est of greater education-industry co- 
operation." 

The association plans to distribute 
the report to its more than 20,000 
members, to 400 affiliated trade and 
industry associations, and to most of 
the nation's school administrators. 
Copies also will be sent to others on 
request. 




Offices Combined 

G. Watson Algire has been appointed 
Director of Admissions and Registra- 
tions, University of Maryland. 

Director Algire's new office combines 
supervision of duties of Director of 
Admissions, an of- 
fice held by the late 
Registrar Alma H. 
Preinkert. 

Director Algire is 
an alumnus of the 
University of Mary- 
land, having re- 
ceived his H.A. in 
1930 and his mas- 
ter's degree in 1931. 
A native of Hamp- 
stead, Md., he at- 
Director Algire tended high school 
there. 

Immediately after receiving his mas- 
ter's degree he became a teacher in 
science in the public schools of Talbot. 
Frederick, and Carroll Counties. In 
1944 he became principal of the Hamp- 
stead High School; in 1947 he was ap- 
pointed Supervisor of High Schools in 
Kent County, where he remained until 
he was appointed Director of Admis- 
sions of the University of Maryland. 

Mr. Algire is married and the father 
of three children. 




"Maryland" 



Physical Therapy 



200 Physical Therapists Are 

Registered In State of 

Maryland. 

l3y 2>*. janetA. liJeUel, PA.2>. 

Chairman, Physical Therapy curriculum 
Colleai ni Physical Education, 
, ation and lh uitu 



I in hysical Medicine" and -Physical 
| Therapy" are synonymous terms. 
The former is the more modern termi- 
nology. Physical Medicine concerns it- 
self with the use of certain physical 




and their resultant effects upon the 
human body. And, even of more im- 
portance, is the need for professional 
personnel to administer these physical 
agents for specific diseases and dis- 
abilities. 

Physical Medicine prescribed by a 
medical doctor for treatment of a spe- 
cific disease or disability is carried out 
by a medical specialist. The medical 
specialist who administers physical 
agents to a patient for therapeutic pur- 
pose under a doctor's prescription is 
called a physical therapist. 

Physical Therapy is a medical service 
employed in all branches of medical 
practice . . . the general medical prae- 
tioner, and the medical specialties such 
as orthopedics, pediatrics, surgery, and 
psychiatry. A physical therapist is part 
of the medical treatment during acute 



INFRA-RED 

Heat ma v be applied locally by moans of 
an infra red unit or an Incandescent bulb of 
large wattage. It may be used for superficial 
painful conditions such as sprains, strains, 
bursitis, neuritis, arthritis, etc. 



measures in the diagnosis and the 
treatment of disease and injury. The 
various procedures in physical medicine 
may be grouped as thermal, chemical, 
mechanical and electrical. 

In the last few years rapid strides 
have been made in the development of 
devices for the harnessing of the physi- 
cal forces existing in our universe and 
for the utilization of these forces for 
therapeutic and diagnostic purposes in 
medicine. One of the latest machines 
employs the use of sound waves (ultra- 
sonic machine) for treatment of specific 
disabilities. These tremendous advance- 
ments in the use of physical methods 
for treatment of disease has lead to an 
ever increasing need for medical re- 
search in the use of the physical agents 




PARAFFIN BATH 

The paraffin bath consists of immersion of 
the extremities in melted paraffin (125° F) 
or the application with a paint brush to the 
surface of the body. It is used to relieve 
swelling and stiffness following fractures, 
sprains, bruises ami of arthritis. 




ULTRAVIOLET 

Ultraviolet Is "sunlight." It Is used by one 
convalescing from some illness. 



10 



ULTRAVIOLET 

Bpol ultraviolet Is used when only a small 
surface needs irradiation. 



and convalescence states of specific ill- 
ness and disabilities. A physical thera- 
pist is part of the medical rehabilitation 
team working for the rehabilitation of 
the chronically ill — a person suffering 
with a long-term illness or disability. 

Rehabilitation 

Medical rehabilitation is treatment 
which employs medical, psychological, 
educational and sociological methods to 
give the disabled patient maximum in- 
dependence commensurate with his lim- 
itations. The team ideally includes the 
physician, nurse, physical therapist, oc- 
cupational therapist, psychologic coun- 
selor, vocational guidance counselor, 
social worker, and recreational and 
physical education director. The first 
step in medical treatment is the relief 
of symptoms, physical restoration or 
cure of disease. Physical restoration 
includes physical therapy or a pros- 
thesis. The second step is orientation 



(«*■*) 




DIATHERMY 

By means of a high frequency current, deep 
seated heat is generated in the tissues where 
needed . . . treatment of arthritis, bursitis, 
etc. 



or instruction in use of what the patient 
has left for living and working and 
playing. Reclassification in the use of 
physical capabilities and mental capac- 
ity is the third step. The next step is 
reeducation or retraining in terms of 
preference and placement opportunities. 
The final step is placement which may 
mean return to school for the student, 
to housework for the wife, or to gainful 
employment for the husband. The peo- 
ple in need of rehabilitation are not sick 
in the usual meaning of the word. But 
they have a chronic disease. A chronic 
disease is one that lasts a long time — 
is an abnormal and persistent change 
in the structure or behavior of some 
part of the body. 




WHIRLPOOL 

The whirlpool bath is a temperature regu- 
lated tub of water, which is agitated about 
the extremity by a turbine. It is used for im- 
proving circulation, relief of pain and stiff- 
ness in arthritis, sprains, strains, infected 
wounds and following fractures. 

"Maryland?' 



f\ 




MUSCLE TESTING 

Electrical use of the faradlc current for 
detecting muscular contractions. Used for 
treatment in nerve Injuries, fractures, 
sprains, etc. 

Importance Of Rehabilitation. 

On the basis of the National Health 
Survey, 177 persons out of every 1 000 
have a chronic disease (illness or dis- 
ability). That's one out of every six 
persons — a total of more than 26,000,- 
000. There is a common notion that 
chronic disease is mostly an old folks' 
problem. However, one case out of 
every six involves a person under 25, 
and one out of every two involves a 
person under forty-five. Dr. W. Palmer 
Dealing, Deputy Surgeon General, U. S. 
Public Health Service estimates that 
about 3,000,000 persons under 20 suffer 
from chronic illness or physical impair- 
ment. 

The following figures reflect as accu- 
rately as possible the numbers needing- 
rehabilitation services. The estimates 
were drawn from generally accepted 
data of professional organizations. 

NUMBER OF HANDICAPPED PERSONS IN 

THE UNITED STATES', JUNE, 1950 

(in thousands) 



Handicapping Conditions 


Children 
(under 21) 


Adults 


Orthopedic handicaps and 


750 


4,000 


Orthopedic handicaps and 
spastic conditions (In- 
cluding cerebral palsy) 


750 


4,000 


Deafness and seriously 
impaired hearing 


750 


2,000 


Speech disorders 


3,500 


2,500 


Blindness and serious 
vision defects 


67 


180 


Epilepsy 


300 


500 


Cardiopathy disorders 
(rheumatic fever) 


500 


3,500 



In spite of advances in safety prac- 
tices and medical sciences, more than 
250,000 persons come to need rehabilita- 
tion each year because of accidents, dis- 
ease or defects with which they were 
born. At this very moment conserva- 
tive estimates place at 2,000,000 indi- 
viduals who are backlog of men, women 




HYDROGALVANIC BATH 

For the transfer of Ions. It is used in 
treatment for neuritis and has been recom- 
mended for pain and swelling following in- 
jury. 



MASSAGE 

Massage may be used as a sc.l.ilive to re 
la\ mUSClefl and relieve pain, or as a Stimu- 
lant to sluggish circulation of s part ol the 
body. 




THERAPEUTIC EXERCISE 

Abdominal exercises are given to maintain 
abdominal muscle tone which is important 
for overall efficient body functioning. 




PULLEY WEIGHTS 

Progressive resistive exercises arc used 
to mobilize wrist, elbow, and shoulder joints 
and to strengthen the muscles of the 
shoulder girdle and arm. 



and children in the United States who 
could benefit from rehabilitation. Kes- 
sler estimates that the ratio of crippled 
children is 3.72 per 1000 children. If 
we assume that Maryland has 662,460 
children (age 1-18 yrs.), there would 
be around 24,400 children in the Free 
State with a physical disability. A con- 
servative estimate of the number of 
disabled adult population in Maryland 
in need of vocational rehabilitation ser- 
vices is around 15,000 adult individuals. 
How many are in need of other rehabili- 
tation services in Maryland? 



K.i-i. N. i ■! ii| Rehabilitation 

The '. t.i. |( ' 

more rapid development of till typ< 
rehabilitation ei ice ii I he ihoi > 
of Trained Professional Personnel. Al- 
though the number of pi re 
ceiving education and ipedalized ,i 
in", in physical medicine and rehabilita- 
tion has ilicic-a til ten till '• 

World War II, the ropplj still I 

jhort, The need for medical ipeclalistl 

trained in physical medicine and re- 
habilitation is even a greater need 
. . . physical therapists, occupational 

therapists, medical social workt 
Chologists, speech and hearing thera- 
pists, vocational guidance counselors, 

special educators and recreational and 
physical education teachers. 




SHOULDER WHEEL 



The shoulder wheel is one of the me- 
chanical devices used to increase the range 
of motion of the upper extremity-shoulder 
joint. 



"Maryland" 



Demand And Supply Of Physical 
Therapists 

Throughout the United States there 
are only thirty-two schools of physical 
therapy located in our Universities and 
Colleges. These Schools of Physical 
Therapy are approved by the Council 
on Medical Education and Hospitals of 
the AMA. The maximum number of 
students graduating from existing 
schools this year is around 650. 

At present in the United States there 
are approximately 6000 registered 
physical therapists employed in medi- 
cal facilities. Today, there are 2,500 
existing jobs unfilled. It is estimated 
that by 1958 with the rapid growth of 
rehabilitation services throughout the 
states there will be a need for 10.000 
physical therapists. 

Physical Therapists In The 
Free State 

There are approximately 200 n . 
tered physical therapists in the State 
of Maryland. These physical therapists 



11 



are practicing in hospitals, crippled 

children centers, private doctor offices, 

schools, public health departments, and 

of rehabilitation. The Free 

te with a population of 2,200,000 
would have one physical therapist for 
every 12,000 persons. And examining 
the distribution of physical therapists 
throughout the state would show that 

of the physical therapists are em- 
ed in the Baltimore area leaving 
an extreme scarcity of this type of 
service for the men, women and chil- 
dren in the counties. 

ryland has no professional physi- 
cal therapy school located in any of its 
schools, colleges, or universities provid- 
ing education and training in this field. 
The closest professional school of phys- 
ical therapy is located in Richmond, Va. 

The Past Program 

Many students in Maryland over the 
past five years have desired to receive 
professional education and training in 
the field of Physical Therapy for their 
life work. The University, recognizing 
its responsibilities to provide educa- 
tional programs in areas of interest for 
its students and this service to the 
State placed a physical therapist on its 
faculty. Dr. Janet A. Wessel, Ph.D., 
was brought to the University of Mary- 
land to give direction and guidance to 
the students interested in obtaining 
professional proficiency in physical 
therapy. 

In September, 1952, a major curricu- 
lum in Pre-Physical Therapy leading 
to a B.S. degree in Physical Therapy 
was instituted. As most of the students 
on campus interested in Physical Ther- 
apy were enrolled in the College of 
Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health, the professional curriculum in 
physical therapy was developed under 
the auspices of this College. 




B.S. Degree in Physical Therapy 

The first three years of this program 
are planned as studies in liberal arts 
and sciences with specific major re- 
quirements basic to the last year of 
professional specialization. The first 
three years are spent on the campus of 
the University of Maryland at College 
Park. The last year is spent at an ap- 
proved school of physical therapy 
affiliated with the University of Mary- 
land.* Upon completion of the last 
year of professional specialization, the 
student returns to the University for 
his degree. The school of physical ther- 
apy awards the student a "Certificate 
of Proficiency" for his year of profes- 
sional work. 

The Present Program 

For the academic year, September, 
1953-June, 1954, the University of 
Maryland has enrolled thirty-two stu- 
dents in its major curriculum leading 
to a B.S. Degree in Physical Therapy. 
At the present time, there is one stu- 
dent in her last year of professional 
study at D. T. Watson School of Psy- 
chiatrics, Leetsdale, Pa. In June, 1954, 
there will be five Maryland students 
ready for their last year of professional 
study at affiliated Schools of Physical 
Therapy . . . Virginia and Pennsylvania. 

Besides the student interest on cam- 
pus, this program is receiving attention 
from many senior high school students 
throughout Maryland. During the last 
year I have answered over 100 enquiries 
from guidance counselors and indi- 
vidual letters from students requesting 
more information concerning this pro- 
gram. However, though the interest is 
exceedingly great, the biggest detri- 
ment to the progress of this major field 
at Maryland is the sending of students 
out of state for their last year of 
specialization. 

What does going out of state the last 
year mean to the student? It means 
that he or she must forego all senior 
activities and affiliations on campus. 
This means the right to graduate with 
his classmates in June. It means secur- 
ing of funds for his last year out of 
state tuition fees and living costs. 

What does going out of state the last 
year mean to the State? It means that 
the students affiliating at an out of 
state school of physical therapy receive 
all of his or her professional studies 
and clinical practices in other medical 
facilities. It means that he or she de- 
velops his professional interests rela- 
tive to the state where he receives his 
professional education and training. It 
means that Maryland does not or can- 
not secure the advantages of research 
and services from its own students in 
the area of physical therapy. 

Future Program 

With the tremendous demand for 
physical therapists in all phases of 
medicine and rehabilitation, the Free 
State is awakening to the need for pro- 



viding professional training and educa- 
tion for its students. This would be a 
four year curriculum with courses 
given at College Park and the Medical 
College, Baltimore. Professional affili- 
ations will be developed throughout 
the state in medical and rehabilitation 
centers. 

SUGGESTED FOUR YEAR CURRICULUM 

B.S'. Degree in Physical Therapy 
First and Second Tear 
Service Courses 
Given by Existing 
Colleges at College 
Park and Baltimore 
Zoology 
Psychology 
Speech 
Education 
Nursing 
Medical College 
Home Economics 
Physical Education 
Basic University 
Requirements for 
Graduation 



Third Year 
Technical Courses 
Given at College Park 



Hydrotherapy 
Massage 

Therapeutic Exercises 
Ethics-Medical 
Physical Therapy 
Technics 

Electrotherapy 

Radiation 

Bandaging 
Clinical Program 



Fourth Year 
College Park and Affiliated Hospitals and 
Baltimore Rehabilitation Centers 

in Maryland 
Internship (last semester, 

senior year) 
Clerkship (6 weeks) sum- 
mer session, Junior year 



Medicine 

Orthopedics 

Pediatrics 

Psychiatry 

Neurology 



Many interested individuals have 
written to the President of the Univer- 
sity and the Governor of Maryland re- 
garding the establishment of the four 
year curriculum outlined above. Money 
was included in the University Budget 
for the establishment of a four year 
curriculum in physical therapy begin- 
ning, July 1, 1954. However, because of 
the cut in operational funds of the over- 
all University for the coming fiscal 
year, the University does not have 
money available to put this new pro- 
gram in operation. 

The immediate future must bring 
about the development of the Complete 
Program for the Professional Education 
and Training of Physical Therapists in 
the State of Maryland. Such a program 
is extremely important to the students 
already enrolled in the physical therapy 
curriculum, to the prospective students 




GONIOMETER 

ifeaanrementa of Joint range of motion are 
recorded on all pre-and post-operative thorac- 
li >nrgcry patients. 



• Affiliated schools : Baruch Center of 
Physical Medicine, Richmond, Va., Duke Uni- 
versity. Boston University, University of 
Colorado, I>. T. Watson School of Psychi- 
atrics, Leetsdale, Pa. 



POSTURE CHART 

A photography of every surgical patient 
is taken pre and postoperatively against the 
posture chart for evaluation and prevention 
of deformities. 



12 



'Maryland" 



\ r-»sJ s ^^sSvSV> J \r i \} / 




POSTURE MIRROR 

Proper alignment of the body segments Is 
facilitated by the utilization of the posture 
mirror in re-education procedures. 



of the next year, and to all future stu- 
dents desiring this major life work. 
Such a program is of vital interest to 
all persons dealing in services for the 
disabled men, women, and children in 
our communities. Physical Therapy is 
one of the professions essential in the 
growth and development of the greatest 
resources of our State . . . rehabilitation 
of human manpower. It will come . . . 
a four year program in the professional 
education and training of physical ther- 
apists at the University of Maryland 
. . . with your continued interest and 
support and need for this project. 



Theatre Tour 

Members of the University Theatre 
enjoyed a tour of Army and Air Force 
bases in Iceland, Newfoundland, Green- 
land, and the Azores, making the trip 
via Military Air Transport Service. 

They presented "Dear Ruth" at eve- 
ning and matinee performances at var- 
ious bases. The company consisted of 
Rhea Mermelstein, Paul Seltzer, Leoma 
Naughton, Eleanor Weinstein, Juditn 
Spencer, Gordon Becker, Dave Single- 
ton, and Joe Muratti in the cast and 
Jane Cahill, manager, Thomas Starchi- 
er, Director and Earl Meeker, technical 
director. 



USO Honors 

Dr. H. C. Byrd, President Emeritus, 
University of Maryland, was guest 
speaker at the annual banquet of the 
Maryland Society of Pennsylvania. 



DEFINITION 

An alumnus is a fellow who owes 
his university nothing; provided he got 
nothing out of it. 

"Maryland" 



Future Teachers 

The Annual Convention of the Mary- 
land Association of Future Teachen 
of America, sponsored by the I Diver- 
sity of Maryland Chapter, took place 
at the University. The convention 
attended by delegations from eleven 
colleges and university chapter! and 
58 high school chapters. 

Special guests were Dr. John Fisch- 
er, Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion, Baltimore; Dr. Thomas B. Sy 
mons, University President; Dr. Wilbur 
Devilbiss, Dean, College of Education, 
and Miss Betty Lowe, National Ed- 
ucation Association. 

Dr. Fischer delivered the feature ad- 
dress and, following luncheon, election 
and installation of officers took place 
at the afternoon session. 

Entertainment features included: 
Musical Girls' Ensemble led by Anna 
Jacquette and accompanied by Jill 
Vasible; Vocal Solo hy Audrey Gold- 
berg accompanied by Shanedel Cohen; 
Vocal Solo by Ivan Genuchi accom- 
panied by Lee Johnson; Creative Dance 
Number by the Modern Dance Club. 

Cooperating organizations on campus 
included Argicultural Student Council, 
Childhood Education Club, Industrial 
Education Club, Business Education 
Club, National Music Educators, Phi 
Alpha Epsilon, and the Women's 
Physical Education Majors Gun. 

Campus Chest 

The University of Maryland Cam- 
pus Chest Drive, conducted by students, 
established a goal of $1.00 per student 
for the drive covering a period of six 
days in March. 

Funds for the drive went to the 
Sister Elizabeth Kenny Foundation, 
Maryland Heart Association, American 
Cancer Society, Muscular Dystrophy 
Fund, Cerebral Palsy League of Prince 
Georges County, World University Ser- 
vice, Near East Foundation, Prince 
Georges County Community Chest, and 
Scholarship for Maryland State Col- 
lege for Negroes. 

Fund raising events taking place in 
support of the drive included Mortar 
Board Project Mum Sales, Sigma Alpha 
Mu Cup, Sophomore Carnival, and Ugly 
Man Contest. 



International Fiesta 

"International Fiesta," was the des- 
ignation of this year's edition of the 
annual frolic of the International Club 
at the University. 

Sibylle Werner, daughter of the Ger- 
man cultural attache, was crowned 
queen of the Fiesta by Dr. T. B. 
Symons. 

The President of the Club is Toshio 
Keta, of Tokyo, Japan. 

Some 60 countries were represented. 

In addition to the usual "prom" 
dance, was a floor show featuring 
specialty numbers in various native 
costumes, including India, the Philip- 
pines, Hawaii, Brazil, and Mexico. 

Representatives of various embas- 
sies in Washington attended. 



Commencement 

The University of Maryland 
Commencement I will I 

place on .'in • 164 on I ' • Q 

rangle at College Park. 

Geary P. Eppley, Daan of Mi 
been appointed General Chairman and 

announced appointment "f Dr. Allan 
duchy as Chief Marshal and sub- 
committee chairmen as follows: Pro- 
curement of Faculty for Comma 
ment — Dr. Wesley Gewehr; Parking 
and Policing — Col. James Regan; 
Sound — Prof. George Hatka; Music — 
Prof. Homer Ulrich; Seating and I 
ers — Prof. Albert Woods; Lunch — Miss 
Jane Crow; Publicity — 1'rof. A. A. 
Crowell; Reception — Dr. E. N. Cory; 
Facilities for Baltimore Schools — Dr. 
J. Ben Allen; Ceremonies — Dr. Robert 
Rappleye; Speakers — Dr. Robert Rap- 
pleye; Invitations, Tickets, and Pro- 
grams — Mrs. Norma Azlein; Decora- 
tions — Prof. Mark Shoemaker; Place 
and Setting — Mr. George Weber; Lost 
and Found — Mr. Doyle Royal; First 
Aid — Dr. Harry A. Bishop. 



Aqualiners 



The performance of "It's a Date," 
the Aqualiner's swimming show, was 
presented twice at the Women's Field 
house. 

The months of the year, the theme 
of the show, was depicted by 12 swim- 
ming routines, each written and di- 
rected by members of the club. 

Routines were enlivened by costumes, 
designed and constructed by the stu- 
colors. 

Lighting effects provided a spectacu- 
lar setting with bathing suits that 
glowed in the dark. Lighting was 
under the capable direction of Bill 
Huff. 

Appropriate music livened the per- 
formances by the all-girl cast. 



2>» 9t Aoua/ 



(<> J with pleasure you are viewing 

Anything a fellow's doing, 

If you like him or you love him, 

Tell him now I 

Don't withhold your approbation 

Til the parson makes oration 

And he lies with snowy lilies on his brow. 

For then, no matter how you shout it, 

lie won't know a word about it. 

He won't know hoio many teardrops you 

have shed. 
If you think some praise is due him, 
Now's the time to slip it to him, 
For he'll never read his tombstone when 

he's dead. 

More than praise and more than money 
Is the comment, kind and sunny ; 
The hearty, warm approval of a friend. 
It accords to life a savor 
And it makes you stronger, braver, 
It gives you heart and spirit to the end, 
If he rates your praise, bestow it. 
Now's the time to let him know it. 
Let the words of true encouragement be said. 
Do not wait til life is over 
And he lies beneath the clover. 
For he'll never read his tombstone when 
he's dead. 



13 



School of 



Law 



G. Kenneth Reiblich '29 




Judge Thomsen 



Judge Thomsen Appointed 

President Eisenhower nominated Ros- 
zel C. Thomsen, Baltimore attorney 
(LL.B., Maryland, 1922), to be a United 
States district judge 
for the District of 
Maryland. 

Mr. Thomsen will 
succed W. Calvin 
Chesnut, retired, al- 
so a Maryland alum- 
nus, as one of the 
two Federal judges 
for Maryland. 

Mr. Thomsen was 
born in Baltimore on 
August 17, 1900. He 
was graduated from 
Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity in 1919 and from the University 
of Maryland's School of Law in 1922. 
He has been serving as a part-time 
lecturer at the University's School 
of law. 

School Commissioner 
A member of the Baltimore law firm 
of Clark, Thomsen and Smith, Mr. 
Thomsen also is president of the Bal- 
timore City Board of School Commis- 
sioners, 1944-5. 

He was secretary, State Board of 
Law Examiners in 1942-1943. 

Judge Thomsen is a former Presi- 
dent of Family Welfare Association, 
Vice President of Council of Social 
Agencies, Vice Chairman of the Board 
of Trustees of Goucher College and 
Director of Practice Court at the School 
of Law, University of Maryland. 

Associate in the law firm of Soper, 
Bowie and Clark (later Bowie and 
Clark), Judge Thompsen was also a 
partner of the late Walter L. Clark, 
of Clark, Thomsen and Smith. 

He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa 
and Omicron Delta Kappa, honorary 
societies, Delta Upsilon Fralternity, 
and Delta Theta Phi legal fraternity. 

Annual Banquet 

The Annual Banquet of the Law 
Alumni will be held on Saturday eve- 
ning, May 8th, 7 p.m., at the Emer- 
son Hotel, Baltimore. Honorable Simon 
E. Sobeloff, law class of 1915, who re- 
cently resigned as Chief Judge of the 
Court of Appeals of Maryland to ac- 
cept appointment as Solicitor General 
of the United States, will be the princi- 
pal speaker. Colonel Clarence W. Miles, 
President of the Maryland State Bar 
Association, (and President of the 
new major league Baltimore Orioles), 
will be the Toastmaster. Guests of 
Honor will include Governor Theodore 
R. McKeldin '25, Honorable Morris E. 
Soper '95, Honorable W. Calvin Ches- 
nut '94, Attorney General Edward D. 
E. Rollins '22, Honorable Wm. P. Cole, 
Jr., Chairman of the Board of Regents, 
and President T. B. Symons. 
Nominations 

The Nominating Committee, appoint- 
ed by the President, Edwin Harlan, un- 
der the chairmanship of Hon. C. Ferdi- 



nand Sybert, has presented to the Sec- 
retary the following list of officers 
for the year 1954-55, to be elected by 
ballot at the banquet: 

President, Hon. J. Dudley Digges, 
'36, Upper Marlboro; First Vice-Presi- 
dent, J. Gilbert Prendergast, '33, Bal- 
timore; Second Vice-President, Hon. 
Stanford I. Hoff, '34, Westminster; 
Third Vice-President, Joseph Bernstein, 
Esq., '18, Baltimore; Secretary-Treas- 
urer, G. Kenneth Reiblich, Esq., '29, 
Baltimore. 

Executive Committee: Miss Mary 
Arabian, '44, Baltimore; Hon. Joseph 
L. Carter, '25, Baltimore; Godfrey 
Child, Esq., '17, Pocomoke City; Thom- 
as B. Finan, Jr., Esq., '39, Cumber- 
land; T. Hughlett Henry, Jr., Esq., 
'35, Easton; Hon. Dorothy T. Jackson, 
'45, Towson; Leon H. A. Pierson, Esq., 
'23, Baltimore; Layman J. Redden, 
Esq., '34, Denton; Benjamin B. Rosen- 
stock, Esq., '25, Frederick; Hon. Allan 
W. Rhynhart, '20, Baltimore. 

Members of the Nominating Commit- 
tee, in addition to the Chairman, were 
Hugo Ricuitti, Frederick W. Invernizzi, 
Leon H. A. Pierson, and G. Kenneth 
Reiblich. 

Alumni Scholarship Plan 

During the year 1953-54, the Execu- 
tive Committee authorized the creation 
of a plan for Alumni Scholarships to 
be awarded each year to needy and 
deserving students in the Law School. 
A committee consisting of Hon. Jos- 
eph L. Carter '25 Chairman, Honorable 
Dorothy T. Jackson '45, Joseph Bern- 
stein '18, Edwin Harlan '34, and G. 
Kenneth Reiblich '29 arranged for a 
mail solicitation of all Alumni as a 
first annual roll call for this purpose. 
The solicitation yielded an initial fund 
of $1,705 from the following named 
sponsors: Hon. Joseph L. Carter '25; 
Weinberg and Green; Hon. Morris A. 
Soper '95; John G. Alexander '26; Rog- 
er Howell '17; Robert E. Coughlan, Jr., 
'24; George Hofferbert '23; Morris 
Fedder '25; R. Dorsey Watkins '25; 
Randolph Barton, Jr. '93; Roszel C. 
Thomsen '22; Edwin Harlan '34; Leon 
H. A. Pierson '23; Bernard M. Savage 
'26; Hon. Dorothy T. Jackson '45; Hon. 
J. Dudley Digges '36; William S. Hart 
'29; Karl F. Steinmann '20; Charles 
Gorfine '29; Hon. Edwin T. Dickerson 
'02; G. Kenneth Reiblich '29 (ex.); 
Alexander Gordon, III, '34; Hon. Mich- 
ael J. Manley '20; George Gump '33; 
F. Gloyd Await '17; John J. Neu- 
bauer '19; Clifford H. Graves '37; Ben- 
jamin B. Rosenstock '25; Hon. S. Ralph 
Warnken '14; Phi Delta Delta Legal 
Fraternity. 

Thomas H. Hedrick '40; Meyer 
Mindel '32; Frank Markoe, Jr '50; 
Grafton Lloyd Rogers '87; T. Hugh- 
lett Henry, Jr. '35; Karl M. Levy '29; 
Carl N. Everstine '47; Don J. Russell 
'46; Thomas N. Bartlett '08; James 
Leonard Benjamin '30; Frank B. Cahn 
'97; Hon. Emory H. Niles '17; Paul 
Berman '22; Randolph S. Rothschild 
'36; H. Richard Smalkin '28; E. M. 
Uouzer '10; John O. Herrmann '40; 
Joseph Bernstein '18; C. Ferdinand Sy- 
bert '25; Israel B. Brodie '05; Joseph 



S. Knapp, Jr. '20; C. Harlan Hurlock, 
Jr. '36; Richard B. Brenner '41; Amos 
A. Holter '32; Charles Crane '33; Je- 
rome L. Klaff '33; Nathan Patz '26; L. 
W. Farinholt, Jr. '40; Theodore C. 
Waters '21; Bridgewater M. Arnold 
'31; Stanford Hoff '34; Norman Park 
Ramsey '47; Theodore Sherbow '47; 
Bernard S. Meyer '38; Robert Clyde 
McKee '10; John Grason Turnbull 
(Hon.) '32; Austin Jenkins Lilly, Sr. 
'07; Walter D. Eiseman '08; Carlos L. 
Gartrell '51; Forrest Fulton Bramble 
'24; L. Edwin Goldman '07; George O. 
Blome '14; I. Wm. Schimmel '16; Phil- 
ip Heller Sachs '28; Joseph W. Star- 
lings '17; Hon. Hall Hammond '25; 
Gerald A. Oster '45; Arnold Silverman 
'38; Mahlon W. Hessey '53; Elroy G. 
Boyer '45; Thomas A. Lurz '36; Eman- 
ual Gorfine '17; Victor M. Wingate 
'48; T. Carroll Brown '50; Charles E. 
Ecker '02; Richard David Thompson 
'51; William J. Little '48; Frederick 
T. M. Crowley '48; Bernard Manekin 
'36; Sylvan Hayes Lauchheimer '92; 
Marvin H. Smith '41; Francis X. Galla- 
gher '52; Frederick Wm. Invernizzi '35; 
Daniel H. Shear '53; Harry N. Hum- 
phreys '25; James C. Mitchell '31; Wil- 
liam Sinsky '25; Clayton C. Carter '46; 
Wm. Taft Feldman '33; Charles K. 
Yost '50; Margaret L. Christ '53; John 
J. Fitzpatrick '24; Herbert F. Murray 
'51; C. Stanley Blair '53; Hon. Charles 
Markell '04; Clayton W. Daneker '38; 
Walter R. Tabler, Jr. '50; Louis P. 
Poulton '51; Mary Arabian '44; J. Gil- 
bert Prendergast '33; Henry G. Burke 
'27; E. Paul Mason, Jr. '40; Herbert S. 
Garten '51; Paul J. Yeager '40; A. 
David Gomborov '33; Estelle W. Gom- 
borov (nee Williams) '33; B. Conway 
Taylor, Jr. '40; Joseph F. Howell '40; 
Lewin Wethered '42 (ex.); Lawrence 
E. Ensor '19; Samuel H. Hoffberger 
'15; Emma S. Robertson '40; John A. 
Chenowith '44; George V. Parkhurst 
'33. 

The Committee is gratified with this 
result, obtained without any pressure, 
and anticipates an expanding interest 
in this program as each annual roll 
call is made to continue this program. 
Anyone who wishes to subscribe to 
the initial 1953-54 call may do so by 
sending his check to G. Kenneth Reib- 
lich, Secretary Alumni Association, 
University of Maryland School of Law, 
Redwood and Greene Sts., Baltimore 
1, Md. 




OrtVs-* 1 "- 



Grade: 'Last night J prayed to the Lord 
for a raise." 

Grouchy: ••You'll never nit it by going 
over my head Uke that!" 



14 



"Maryland" 



College of 



Education 

- June Jacobs Brown 

To Los Angeles 

The Department of Industrial Edu- 
cation was represented by Dr. R. Lee 
Hornbake, Professor of Industrial Edu- 
cation, at the 1954 annual convention 
of the American Industrial Arts Asso- 
ciation and its affiliate, the American 
Council on Industrial Arts Teacher 
Education at Los Angeles, Cal. 

Dr. Hornbake is a charter member 
of both the AIAA and ACIATE and, 
as the current vice-president of the 
latter, he assumed the major responsi- 
bility for planning the programs of 
this year's national convention as well 
as actively participating as co-chair- 
man and discussion leader of plenary 
sessions throughout the convention. 

Significant recognition of leader- 
ship at Maryland University in the 
field of Industrial Arts teacher educa- 
tion is being evidenced by the selec- 
tion of Dr. Hornbake and Dr. Don 
Maley, Associate Professor of Indus- 
trial Education, to collaborate in an 
extensive survey and reporting of an 
Inventory study of all American Col- 
leges and Universities where indus- 
trial arts teacher education programs 
are known to occur. Their study will 
be published as the Fourth Yearbook 
of the Aciate, to be distributed in- 
ternationally, under the title Supe- 
rior Practices in Industrial Arts 
Teacher Education. 

Prior To 1657 

Dr. Hornbake addressed the District 
of Columbia Chapter of the Order of 
the Founders and Patriots of Amer- 
ica at the Statler Hotel. This organi- 
zation is unique in that it requires all 
members to be lineally descended in 
an unbroken male line from a settler 
in a Colony prior to May 13, 1657. 

At Dallastown 

Dr. Maley, Associate Professor of 
Industrial Education, served as an 
educational consultant at the Annual 
York County Teacher's Institute at 
Dallastown, Pennsylvania. Dr. Maley's 
contributions to the institute were 
chiefly in the area of "methods of 
teaching" as they pertain to effective 
Industrial Arts instruction in the pub- 
lic school programs. 

Similarly, Dr. Maley has been regu- 
larly participating in Maryland high 
schools guidance and counselling ac- 
tivities by showing a sound movie, 
Career Decision, the production of 
which was directed by Dr. Maley, staff 
associates, and students in Industrial 
Education, with the cooperation of 
the Speech Department and county 
high schools adjacent to the university 
campus. 

Open House 

The Industrial Education Depart- 
ment held its Seventh Annual Open 
House in the New Industrial Education 
Building. Industrialists, educators, and 
laymen from Maryland, Pennsylvania, 
Virginia and the District of Columbia 



attended. The public was invited. 

This year's event was the first in 
the new and expanded physical plant 
designed and equipped exclusively for 
Industrial Education. This new struc- 
ture comprises laboratories for machine 
shop work, automotives, foundry, weld- 
ing, sheet metal, graphic arts, wood- 
working, drafting, photography, elec- 
tricity, training aids development anil 
a variety of crafts including ceramics, 
jewelry, lapidary, textiles, plastics, art 
metal, cold metal, and ieatherwork. 
These areas weir in operation during 
the Open House with selected demon- 
strations. 

High schools in Maryland exhibited 
projects and items produced in their 
school shops. 

A meeting in the Conference Room 
was sponsored jointly by the Indus- 
trial Education Department and Tota 
Lambda Sigma. The speaker was Lt. 
Col. L. D. Johnston from Chanute Air 
Base in Illinois, on the topic "Technical 
Training Needs of a Modern Air 
Force," a discussion period followed. 

This annual affair is a part of the 
educational program of the Industrial 
Education Department designed to de- 
velop and encourage leadership quali- 
ties in the future teachers of Industrial 
Education. 



College of 



Business & Public 
Administration 



Egbert F. Tinley 



To Youth Hostels 

Al Danegger, head of the Photo- 
graphic Section of the University 
has been appointed to the National 
Board of Directors of the American 
Youth Hostels, Inc., it was announced 
by Justin J. Cline, Executive Director 
of the non-profit, 
educational travel 
organization. Other 
directors include 
Edward C. Jenkins, 
Secretary -Treasurer 
of the 'Buck Hill 
Falls Company, 
president of the 
board; and vice- 
presidents Percival 
F. Brundage, Price 
Waterhouse & Co., 
and Arthur K. Wat- 
son, vice-president 
of IBM World Trade Corporation. 

The American Youth Hostels sponsor 
travel tours, by bicycle and on foot, to 
places of historic and cultural interest 
in America and abroad. 

Mr. Danegger, assistant professor 
of press photography (B&PA), is a 
committee chairman of the National 
Press Photographer's Association, and 
a member of the local board of direc- 
tors of the American Youth Hostels. 

Last year, at a national convention 
of the National Press Photographers' 
Association, he successfully sponsored 
a resolution extending membership in 




Mr. Danegger 



the organization to collegiate photog- 
raphers working anywhei. 
publications. 

Journalism Lecturei 

A series of monthly led , 

paper publishers is being I by 

the Mary land Press Association. 

The M I' \ l ecture 8* i idmin- 

istered by the association's education 

committee, headed by Elmer M. .lack- 
son, Jr., general manager of Capital 
Gazette-Press, Annapolis. 

Mr. Jackson works with William 
Cahill, president of the Univrrs.it> of 
Maryland Press Club, in scheduling 

the lectures by newspapermen before 

students in the Department of Journal- 
ism and Public Relations. 

Other members of the education com- 
mittee are Dr. Neil Swanson of Balti- 
more; John Coffman, Jr., Takoma 
Journal; and Kugene Gunning, Cum- 
berland Times. 

Dr. Swanson started the Baltimore 
Sunpapers Lectures for Journalism 
majors at Maryland three years ago. 
Journalism Scholarships 
A number of $320 scholarships for 
majors in the Department of Journalism 
and Public Relations will be established 
by members of the Maryland Press 
Association. 

The association voted, in annual con- 
vention in Baltimore, to set up the 
scholarships to encourage journalism 
majors. Each scholarship of $320 is 
planned to pay fixed charges and enroll- 
ment fees for one student for two 
semesters. 

Faculty of the department will 
recommend students to the MPA edu- 
cation committee which will administer 
the scholarships. 

Two more annual citations for 
journalism majors also were voted by 
the Maryland newspaper publishers. 

They will be given to the best news 
writer of the department and to the 
outstanding woman journalism major. 

MPA already cites the best journal- 
ism major in the University. This 
award went to Gordon Beard in 1951, 
who is now with the Associated Press; 
E. M. Jackson HI, 1952, now with 
Westinghouse Electric Co., Pittsburgh; 
Ralph Magee, 1953, with the Baltimore 
Evening Sun. 

In Germany 
Pan American World Airways has 
announced the promotion of William I. 
Miller, class of 1939, from District 
Traffic and Sales 
Manager, Stuttgart, 
to Military Sales 
Rep resentative — 
Europe, with head- 
quarters in Frank- 
furt, Germany. 

A member of Beta 
Alpha Psi. Mr. Mill- 
er was manager of 
track a n d cross- 
country and a mem- 
ber of the "M" Club. 
He is a native oi 
Baltimore, is mar- 
ried to the former Irish Fearneley. of 
Bermuda and F.ast Angus, Quebec, and 
has four children. Familj lives in 
Frankfurt. 




Mr. Miller 



"Maryland" 



15 



In Washington 

Dr. J. Donald Watson, Department 
of Business Organization and Admin- 
'. ashington, D. C. 
Life Insurance in the Family's In- 
fer the 
I . 

In Baltimore 

M. \\ edeberg of the 

.f Business Organization 

e before the Maryland Chapter of 

the American Woman's Society of 

tied Public Accountants in Balti- 

rl - topic was "Stock Brokerage 

To Journalism Committee 

A iggins, Managing Editor of 
1 shington Post and Times Herald 
been appointed a member of the 
Maryland Tress Association's Educa- 
tion Committee. 

The committee meets twice a year 
to advise the University administra- 
tion on development of the Department 
of Journalism and Public Relations. 

Committee Chairman is E. M. Jack- 
son, Jr., Vice President and General 
Manager of the Capital-Gazette Press, 
Annapolis; Dr. Neil Swanson, Balti- 
more; Eugene Gunning, Managing Edi- 
tor, Cumberland Times; and John W. 
Coffman, Jr., Publisher, Takoma Jour- 
nal. 

\i New Hampshire 

I'rofessor Reuben G. Steinmeyer of 
the Department of Government and 
Politics, served as installing officer in 
the inauguration 
'■ of a new chapter 
of Pi Sigma Alpha 
Fraternity at the 
University of New 
Hampshire. 

1'i Sigma Alpha 
Fraternity is the 
national political 
science honor 
society. Its nation- 
al office is located 
on the campus of 
the University of 
Maryland, Profes- 
sor Joseph R. Starr 
being its national 
Secretary-Treasurer. Professor Stein- 
meyer is Faculty Adviser of Alpha 
Zeta Chapter of the University of 
Maryland. 

The new chapter at the University 
of New Hampshire will be the sixty- 
fifth chapter of the rapidly growing 
political .science honorary. 

The honorary members who will be 
received into Pi Sigma Alpha Frater- 
nity by Dr. Steinmeyer are: Dean 
Edward V. Blewett, College of Liberal 
Arts, University of New Hampshire; 
Louis C. Wyman, Attorney General, 
State of New Hampshire; Colonel Hugh 

A Hamilton. 

Dr. Burdette'fl Appointment 

Dr. Franklin L. Burdette, Head of 
the Uni\' Department of Gov- 

ernment and Politics, has been granted 

16 





Dr. Htcinmeuer 




leave from the University to enable 
him to accept a most important posi- 
tion with the Federal government as 
Chief of the Infor- 
mation Center Serv- 
ice of the U. S. In- 
formation Agency, 
with administrative 
charge of the over- 
seas library pro- 
gram embracing 158 
information centers 
in 63 countries and 

«~B|Mfl I also supervision of 

I the American book 
e^e\ ^B I translation p r o- 

Dr. Burdette & ram ' book Plan- 
tations to universi- 
ties and other institutions, and guid- 
ing United States Cultural Affairs 
Officers. 

The appointment is an emergency 
one at a critical time. 

The federal assignment for Dr. Bur- 
dette is to expire on 30 June 1955 and 
in reference to it, Dr. Burdette said, 
"My life work has been dedicated to 
university education, and I wish to 
continue my service with the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. As a political scient- 
ist, I believe it a major opportunity 
educationally to be of service to the 
country in my specialty and in an area 
closely related to the overseas instruc- 
tion of the University. At the same 
time, I am sure that it will be pos- 
sible to return to my duties here with 
enlarged contacts and information for 
teaching and administrative service to 
the Department." 

Dr. Burdette has served an eight 
year term as professor and head of 
the G and P department. Before he 
had been associate professor at Butler, 
prior to which he taught political sci- 
ence at Princeton, where he received 
his Ph.D. 

While at Marshall College and Ne- 
braska he was awarded an A.B. and 
M.A. respectively. Between 1939 and 
1950 Dr. Burdette has worked as au- 
thor and co-editor of several govern- 
ment and historical text books and 
periodicals. 

His chief works are Filibustering in 
the Senate, Political Parties, Lobbyists 
in Action and Elections in Maryland. 
In 1947 he co-edited Historical Mono- 
graplis on religious and administrative 
institutions. 

Professor Plischke 

Dr. Elmer Plischke was appointed 
Acting Head of the Department of 
Government and Politics during the ab- 
sence of Professor Franklin L. Bur- 
dette. 

I'rofessor Plischke came to Maryland 
from DePauw University, Greencastle, 
Indiana, in 1948. He is a graduate of 
Marquette University, the American 
University, and Clark University, as 
well as the United States Naval Mili- 
tary Government School of Columbia 
University. 

In 1950 Professor Plischke was 
granted a leave of absence from Mary- 



land, and was appointed Special His- 
torian to the United States High Com- 
missioner for Germany, and, during 
the summer of 1952, he was appointed 
as a Consultant to the Department of 
State. As government historian, he 
prepared and published seven volumes 
on the Allied High Commission for 
Germany, the West German Govern- 
ment, the government and administra- 
tion of Berlin, and Allied-West Ger- 
man relations. 

Since his arrival at Maryland, Pro- 
fessor Plischke has published Conduct 
of American Diplomacy, International 
Relations: Basic Documents, and a 
number of articles in various profes- 
sonal journals. Together with Dr. Rob- 
ert G. Dixon, of the Department of 
Government and Politicis, he also pub- 
lished American Government: Basic 
Documents. 

To Saigon 

Dr. Joseph R. Starr, Government and 
Politics, has been appointed a public 
administration adviser to the Govern- 
ment of Saigon, Indo-China, U. S. For- 
eign Operations Administration an- 
nounced. 

He has already had five years of 
Government service, returning from 
war service in 1950. 

Dr. Starr was awarded his B.A. at 
Nebraska; M.A. and Ph.D. at Minne- 
sota where he also taught on the Po- 
litical Science staff. 

His family will accompany him to 
Saigon. 

Worked To Travel 

Doris Crewe, '50 of Kensington 
reached the top of her career ladder 
at the age of 23. She wanted to work 
so she could afford to travel. Her first 
position was as a secretary in the 
office of Tom Pickett, member of Con- 
gress from Texas who later resigned. 
She is now executive Secretary to John 
Dowdy, member of Congress from 
Texas. Her activities include, Secre- 
tary of the Bethesda Chevy Chase 
branch of the American Association of 
University Women, Secretary of the 
Mortar Board Alumnae of Washington, 
Gamma Phi Beta Alumnae and the 
Congressional Secretaries Club. In 
1951, Miss Crewe went to Texas with 
stopovers in New Orleans and Illinois. 
She later went to Europe visited rela- 
tives in England and traveled to the 
cities of Oslo, Stockholm, Copenhagen 
and Amsterdam. Southern Europe is 
on the agenda for next fall while this 
year it is south of the border to 
Mexico then back to East Texas and a 
return to her work in the Congressional 
office. 

From Great Britain 

Professor Charles A. Fisher of the 
Institute of Colonial Studies, Oxford 
University, and Leicester University 
College, England, gave a series of lec- 
tures on Eastern and South-Eastern 
Asia. 

Prof. Fisher is a Geographer who 
is intimately acquainted with South- 
Eastern Asia and its present problems. 
After finishing at Cambridge Univer- 
sity, England, he held for several years 
the Bartle Frere Research Scholarship 

"Maryland" 



of St. Catherine's College at Cam- 
bridge, then served with the British 
Army in Malaya. He was taken pris- 
oner of war by the Japanese after the 
capitulation of Singapore. As a pris- 
oner of war he was co-founder of 
Changi P.O.W. University, and later, 
still as a Japanese prisoner, worked on 
railroad construction in Thailand in 
Siam. He has been connected with the 
University of Wales, and is now with 
the Institute of Colonial Studies at 
Oxford University and University Col- 
lege of Leicester. At present he is Ex- 
change Professor of Geography at Yale 
University. 

He is the author of many articles 
on South-Eastern Asia, Editor of Geo- 
graphical Studies, and Co-Editor with 
Prof. R. W. Steel of "Geographical Es- 
says on British Tropical Lands." 

Prof. Fisher spoke on "Problem of 
Malayan Unity," "Japan, the Britain 
of the East," "The Role of South-East 
Asia" and "Why Does American and 
British Policy Diverge in the Far 
East." 

For Journalism 

The Legislature passed a bill au- 
thorizing the construction of a build- 
ing for the Department of Journalism 
and Public Relations at a cost of 
$350,000. 

The four-story building will be ready 
for occupancy by September, 1955. 
It had been requested of the Assem- 
bly the past two years by Dr. H. C. 
Byrd, President Emeritus, and Dr. T. 
B. Symons, president. 

The building's facilities will include 
offices, classrooms, library, and lab- 
oratories. 

The Department of Publications and 
Publicity, charged with producing offi- 
cial publications as well as general 
press releases will be housed in the 
new building as well as the four stu- 
dent publications and student radio 
station WMUC. 

Included will be the offices for the 
Maryland Press Association, along with 
the University press that prints offi- 
cial publications of the University and 
also offices for Pi Delta Epsilon, jour- 
nalistic activities honorary, and the 
Press Club. 

The Maryland Press Association the 
last two years passed resolutions urg- 
ing construction of the building. The 
MPA Education Committee is com- 
posed of E. M. Jackson, Jr., Chairman, 
Vice-President of the Capital-Gazette 
Press, Annapolis; Dr. Neil H. Swanson, 
Baltimore; Eugene Gunning, Managing 
Editor, Cumberland Times; and John 
W. Coffman, Jr., Publisher, Takoma 
Journal. 

Present plans put the site of the 
building on the north side of the Ad- 
ministration building facing Symons 
Hall, according to Prof. Alfred A. 
Crowell, Head of the Department of 
Journalism and Public Relations. 

Asia Lectures 

Dr. Charles Y, Hu, Professor of 
Geography, recently delivered a series 
of lectures on Asia to the Faculty and 

"Maryland" 




BEST JOURNALIST 

Vorman II airing ton (left) president of Ihr 
Maryland Pre** Association , presented ihr 

association's citation, for the Department of 
Journalism and Public Relations' top male 
senior of 1953, to ltntph Magee. of Takoma 
Park, (right) who is now working on the 
Baltimore Evening Sun's copy desk. The cita- 
tion was awarded at MPA's annual conren- 
tion February 13 in the Lord Baltimore Hotel. 
Miiiiee was a managing editor of the Diamond- 
back in 1953. 




Student Body of the Counter Intelli- 
gence School, Department of the Army. 
To Stanford 
Dr. J. Donald Watson, Department 
of Business Organi- 
zation and Admin- 
istration, will teach 
two insurance cours- 
es in the two terms 
of the summer quar- 
ter at Stanford Uni- 
versity. He will also 
pai'ticipate in the 
program of the Bus- 
iness Conference at 
Stanford Univer- 
se Watson sity. 

Tobacco Culture Report 

The relation of tobacco culture to 
Southern Maryland is reported in a 
publication of the Bureau of Business 
and Economic Research, just off the 
press. Included in the study are the 
economies of Calvert, Charles, part of 
Prince Georges, and St. Mary's Coun- 
ties. 

Though much of this area frequent- 
ly has been regarded as retarded eco- 
nomically, actually there has been rap- 
id development in the last twenty-five 
years under the impetus of tobacco, 
fishing and oystering, military installa- 
tions, and recreational opportunities. 
The rate of growth of general business 
transactions, as measured by bank deb- 
its, has been nine percent. 

Originates Here 
More than 99 percent of Maryland's 
tobacco crop originates in this area, 
whereas as a whole State, Maryland is 
dependent upon tobacco for only ten 
percent of its crop income. Three of 
the counties derived 75 percent or 
more of their crop income from this 



single crop, Consequent!) , divei tifica 
tion ia urged, noi onlj of othei i 
and live tock, bu1 "f light ind i 
well. However, It i pointed out that 
concerted planning is essential i>> pi 
anent benefit, since the specific indu 
tries to !><• encouraged ihould fit Into 

the resources and potential ot 
Bl ea. 

However, it is not propo ed thai the 
total acreage allocated to tobao i 
reduced. Rather it i luggested that 
additional acreage be placed under cul- 
tivation and more extensive farming 
be directed toward improving quality. 

An important outlet for Maryland 
tobacco is European demand, particu- 
larly of Switzerland. European cigar- 
ette smokers have for decades favored 
Maryland tobacco, and continental 
manufacturers have been accustomed to 
use a proportion as high as 80 per 
of the total. The war did not destroy 
the taste preference for Maryland 
bacco, but rather reduced the means 
of purchase. In the last six years, 
U.S. aid to other countries has ac- 
counted for about 25 percent of total 
Maryland leaf exports. The European 
market is so important that efforts 
are recommended to extend further 
credit to guarantee the quality and to 
open American markets to imports of 
commodities which, when sold, will 
provide dollars. 

Superior Crop 

Among recommendations are con- 
tinued scientific research which already 
indicates the superiority of Maryland 
tobacco in burning qualities and low 
nicotine content. Other experiments 
include reducing production costs by 
the adoption of mechanization. 

The report states: "Southern Mary- 
land provides a fortunate paradox: It 
is a new area with a wealth of his- 
tory . . . Southern Maryland has not 
yet been spoiled by willful destruction 
or inadequate conservation of its re- 
sources. Today is the time to plan for 
its future." With this as a theme, a 
comprehensive project is proposed for 
the development of this area includ- 
ing moderate industrialization, recrea- 
tion, and conservation. 

Also included in this study are land 
use capabilities, the practical market- 
ing problems, financing, and the place 
of naval installations in economic de- 
velopment. 




wa*. 



■Mrs Achtmacher. will you please reas- 
sure the Board of Regents that that stuff 
really dries in Jire minutes." 



17 



School of 



Dentistry 

Dr. Jos. C. Biddix 
Gardner P. H. Foley 



On I'SS Bushnell 

Navy Dentist Lt. (jg) Henry W. 
Rucker, Jr., School of Dentistry 
'53, is serving in the submarine tender, 
S Bushnell, based at Key West, 
Florida. 

S. Carolina Prexy 
During his undergraduate years 
Clarence Irvin Saunders demonstrated 
capacities for accomplishment and 
leadership that led his classmates to 
predict for him a fine career in den- 
tistry. That he has fulfilled expecta- 
tions is well indicated by his activities 
since his graduation in the Class of 
1931. Born in Florence, S. C, "Sport" 
received his predental training at the 
University of South Carolina, where he 
was a member of Pi Kappa Phi. At 
Maryland he was a member of the 
Gorgas Odontological Society and Psi 
Omega. In his senior year he was Edi- 
tor-in-Chief of the Terra Marine, the 
yearbook of the combined Baltimore 
schools of the University. 

In Florence, S. C. 

Following his graduation Dr. Saund- 
ers began the general practice of 
dentistry in Florence, S. C, where he 
was also Consulting Oral Surgeon on 
the staff of the Saunders Memorial 
Hospital. In 1941, after ten years of 
practice, he entered the service. Over 
a period of three and a half years he 
served in the Pacific Theatre, as Chief 
of Dental Service of the Sixth Air 
Service Area Command. On his separa- 
tion from the service he was the Act- 
ing Chief of Service, Army Air Forces, 
Pacific Ocean Areas, with the rank of 
Major. 

Having made the important decision 
to specialize in periodontia, Dr. Saund- 
ers began the postgraduate study in 
that field at the University of Michi- 
gan. In 1946 he was certified by the 
Specialty Boards of the State of South 
Carolina and opened an office in Colum- 
bia, S. C, for the limited practice of 
periodontia. 

Interested In Organization 

Early in his professional career Dr. 
Saunders began to participate actively 
in the important area of dental organi- 
zation. During his first three years as 
a practitioner he served as Secretary- 
Treasurer of the Pee Dee Dental So- 
ciety; in 1934-5 he was its Vice-Presi- 
dent and in 1935-6, its President. In 
1946 he became the President of the 
Central District Dental Society. Gain- 
ing recognition by his fellow dentists 
throughout the state, he served the 
South Carolina State Dental Associa- 
tion as Directing Secretary in 1936-7 
and from 1946 to 1949. In i950 he was 
elevated to the office of Vice-President; 
during the year 1952-3 he was the 
President of the Association. For 
twenty years he has been a memher of 
the Lions Club of Columbia and is a 
Past-President, 




IN SOUTH CAROLINA 

Olorence Saunders, D.D.S. '31, President, 
South Carolina State Dental Association. 



Dr. Saunders was a member of the 
State Board of Dental Examiners, 
1936-41, and was President of the 
Board in 1939-40. Since 1946 he has 
been Consultant to the Regional Office 
of the VA. His professional member- 
ships include the Carolinas Periodontal 
Study Club, Southern Academy of Peri- 
odontology, American Academy of Per- 
iodontology, Pierre Fauchard Academy, 
and International Academy of Den- 
tistry. He has presented clinics before 
all of the district societies in North 
Carolina and South Carolina, the North 
Carolina and South Carolina Associa- 
tions, the Southern Dental Association 
and the Southern Academy of Peri- 
odontology. Besides contributions to 
several dental journals he wrote in 
1950 a pamphlet on Your Teeth and 
How to Keep Them. 

"Sport" married Elizabeth Ann 
Trax, of Warren, Pa., in 1931. They 
have two children: Mrs. Charles R. 
Penney Jr., of Columbia; and Harri- 
son, now attending the University of 
the South. 

At Key West 

Navy Dentist Lt. Henry V. P. Keilly 
'44, returned to the U. S. Naval Base 
for his second tour of duty at Key 
West, Florida. Dr. Keilly will be at- 
tached to the Naval Dispensary. 

From September 1944, to June 1945, 
Dr. Keilly served in general dentistry 
at the Naval Training Center, Bain- 
bridge, Md., before being transferred 
to Key West, where he remained until 
1946. He practiced dentistry from 
March 1946, to October 1952, at Little 
Falls, N. J. 

Dr. Keilly was recalled to active duty 
in 1952 and served at the Goodfellow 
Air Force Base at San Angelo, Texas, 
for one year before he was again trans- 
ferred here. 

TV Truant 

The alumni records show that sev- 
eral of our graduates have achieved 

****** 
PREPOSITIONS 

Ending sentences in prepositions is 
one phase of writing up with which 
these pages will not putt 



recognition for work done outside the 
area of dental practice. Perhaps for 
the first time an alumnus has earned 
for himself a reputation in the field 
of creative writing. Besides conduct- 
ing a practice in Closter, N. J., Dr. 
George Krasnow, of the Class of 1933, 
has been busily engaged in professional 
theatrical writing. 

After graduating from Maryland, 
where he also took his predental course, 
Dr. Kasnow interned at the City Hos- 
pital in New York City. In World War 
II he served for five years, chiefly 
with armored infantry units, and was 
separated with the rank of Major in 
the Dental Corps. 

"Song Of Hope" 

In 1949 Dr. Krasnow wrote "Song of 
Hope," a film released nationwide by 
Association Films. He collaborated 
with Art Ford, of the "Milkman's Mat- 
inee" program, in writing the song 
"Hills Far Away," which was published 
and recorded. With David Matthews, 
executive producer of "Big Town," Dr. 
Krasnow established the firm of K. M. 
Productions Co. for Television, with 
offices in Los Angeles. At present he 
has one television show, which he origi- 
nated, in rehearsal in Hollywood. It is 
scheduled for presentation this summer 
over a national hookup. In June he 
will begin rehearsals of a show that he 
will produce out of New York. De- 
spite his successes in writing, George 
is devoted to his profession and will 
continue to practice. 

In 1947 Dr. Krasnow was elected to 
membership in the Authors Guild, Au- 
thors League of America, a national 
organization of professional writers. 
He married Mildred Blumberg in 1940. 
Their son John, going on six, has al- 
ready shown a predilection for his 
father's profession and should be land- 
ing at Lombard and Greene in about 
1970. 

Old Timer 

Dr. Vinton LeF. Hewitt, ,of Duluth, 
Minnesota recently sent a picture of 
himself as he ap- 
peared for his grad- 
uation in 1908. He 
will reach his 80th 
birthday this year 
and practiced ac- 
tively until 3 years 
ago. He sent his 
regrets concerning 
his inability to at- 
tend the Testimonial 
Dinner for Dr. Byrd 
last December. He 
said, "Even if I had 
been Dr. H. C. Byrd, I believe I would 
have considered it too cold to attend 
the dinner in his honor. Perhaps our 
Duluth weather will be milder in the 
Spring and I will be able to make a 
trip East to see all of you." 

Massachusetts Society 
Dr. Eugene J. Dionne, of Fall River, 
Mass., a member of the Class of 1936, 
is the President of the Massachusetts 
Dental Society and thus occupies one 
of the most important offices in the 
organized dentistry of this country. 
"Gene" entered Maryland after pre- 




Dr. Hewitt 



18 



"Maryland" 




Diottnt 



liminary education in the public schools 
of New Bedford, Mass. and a predental 
course at St. John's 
College of Annap- 
olis, Md. As an un- 
dergraduate ho was 
quiet and industri- 
ous, demonstrating 
a devoted interest in 
his future profes- 
sion. After his grad- 
uation he began to 
attract the atten- 
tion of the local and 
state leaders by his 
earnest and reliable 
efforts to support 
and advance the best interests of his 
profession. Particularly important was 
his strong participation in the profes- 
sion's movement to persuade the legis- 
lators of the state to rescind the highly 
objectionable law permitting dental 
hygienists to do certain operations 
heretofore confined by law to the 
province of the dentist. 

New Bedford Native 
The son of the late Walter and Izella 
(Vincent) Dionne, Dr. Dionne was born 
in New Bedford on May 2, 1911. Fol- 
lowing his graduation from Maryland 
he entered the general practice of 
dentistry in Fall River. He has taken 
postgraduate and refresher courses at 
Cambridge City Hospital, Tufts Dental 
School and the University of Michigan 
Dental School. He is a member of the 
Staff at Union Hospital and St. Anne's 
Hospital in Fall River. He is Dental 
Consultant of Region VIII for Civilian 
Defense. 

Like the majority of his classmates 
Dr. Dionne served his country in World 
War II. From October 1942 to March 
1946 he served in the Army Dental 
Corps, being separated with the rank 
of Major. 

Dr. Dionne has had excellent train- 
ing over a wide area of dental organi- 
zational activities. On the local level 
he was Secretary and also Treasurer 
of the Fall River Dental Societv. From 
1948 to 1952 he was a Trustee of the 
state Society from the Southeastern 
District Society. In 1949 he was elected 
President of the Franco-American Den- 
tal Society and in 1951, President of 
the Massachusetts Dental Officers of 
World War II. In 1952 he became Vice- 
President of the state Society. As 
President-Elect of the Society, pre- 
sumably for 1953-54, Dr. Dionne had 
the unusual experience of serving in 
that capacity for only two hours. At 
the May 1953 annual meeting of the 
Society Dr. Raymond Nagle resigned 
as President because of his appoint- 
ment as Dean of New York Univer- 
sity's College of Dentistry. Thus 
"Gene" came to the office of President 
without the usual year as President- 
Elect. In May he will have the great 
honor of presiding over the 90th an- 
nual meeting of the Society. 
Other Memberships 
Dr. Dionne's other professional mem- 
berships include Psi Omega, Pierre 
Fauchard Academy, and Federation 
Dentaire Internationale. He also is a 
member of the Republican League of 
Massachusetts, the Franco-American 
Civic League, the Lions Club, the St, 

"Maryland" 



.ban Baptiste Society, the ftfaaaachu 
setts Catholic Order of Foresters ( the 
Quequechan Club, the Calumet Club 
and the New Bedford Country Club. 
"Gone" married Lucioiuic Gslipeaa 

of Taunton, Mass. in 1989. They have 
two children: I, uric A nne, six, and 
Eugene, Jr., now in his second year. 
Life Members 

Several years ago the National Alum- 
ni Association established tin- Life 
Membership plan. Article 2 of the Con- 
stitution, adopted in 1918, provides that 
"On the payment of $100.00 any active 
member may become a life member, 
without the payment of annual dues. 
The money paid under the life member- 
ship plan shall be retained in a Spe- 
cial Life Membership Fund, the cap- 
ital of which shall be kept invested 
and from which only tthc interest may 
be expanded for working projects, i.e., 
research, fellowship, etc." 

Although the Life Membership plan 
is young in its operation, the response 
of the alumni has proved to be a 
strong reflection of the loyal spirit of 
the men who have graduated from the 
several Baltimore dental schools that 
are now centered in the Baltimore Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery, Dental School, 
University of Maryland. The present 
list contains the names of 88 gradu- 
ates, representing 39 classes. The 
Class of 1926 and the class of 1928 
lead in the number of Life Members 
with six each. The Class of 1944, 
demonstrating a surprising strength 
for a comparatively young group, is 
third with five members. Following 
these three classes are the Classes of 
1914, 1922, 1932, 1933, and 1934, each 
having four members. 

Geographical Distribution 

The geographical distribution of the 
Life Members points up sharply the 
fact that the Maryland alumni, because 
of their intimate knowledge of the 
purposes of the plan, have responded 
far beyond their ratio. Following Mary- 
land with 41 are New Jersey 13, Con- 
necticut 5, Massachusetts 4, Florida 3, 
North Carolina 3, Rhode Island 3, New 
York 2, Virginia 2, West Virginia 2, 
California 2, District of Columbia 2, 
Illinois 1, South Carolina 1, Texas 1, 
New Hampshire 1. Canada and Puerto 
Rico each have one representative on 
the roll. 

1901 
James J. McCormick. Troy, N. Y. 

1903 
Rudolph O. Schlosser. Wtlinette, 111. 

1908 
Luclan G. Coble, Greensboro, N. C. 

1910 
Arthur L. Davenport, Baltimore; S. Vernon 
Striekler, Charville, Va. 
1911 
Luther C. Mlnter. Greenville, S. C. 

1914 
Joseph C. Carvalho, Kail River. Mass. ; J. 
Ben Robinson, Morgantown, W. Va. : James 
H. Samuel, Lake Worth, Fla. ; Howard Van 
Natta, Baltimore. 

1915 
James H. Ferguson. Jr. Baltimore; Con- 
rad L. Inman. Sr., Baltimore. 
1916 
Max K. Baklor, Baltimore ; William F. 
Martin, Baltimore. 

1917 
Joseph J. Godson. Troy, N. Y. 

1919 
George M. Anderson. Baltimore ; Arthur I. 
Bell, Baltimore. 

1920 
Edward C. Morin, Pawtucket, R. I. 
1921 
TV. Buckey Clemson, Baltimore. 



kdam Bock, Baltimore Raul m Gale, 
ri \ i Ethelberl 
shin, v U Rothfedei n.» Britain ' ono 

mi \ i.. x in, Newark M i i i»ar«t 
n oibtrina, Newarl N I Harrj i m 

• 'iirtin. Dallaa, Tezat 

1024 

Jiiiim m w \|. i „,| Qreenbi n \|,| 

Qarabed M Rakemlan Providen • it i 

w <;].!, n Katm \..ii,.ik \ 
riiiiiips. Baltimore 

1026 
Oaorga i: Hard] Baltlmon Han? Levin, 
Baltimore i Joaeph J Martin P 
James i: i'\,.it. Baltimore; wiiii.-im i: Trail 

Frederick. Md. ; 1*1.1 1 W \M \l„ r 

canton. N. ('. 

1927 
Augustine I, CaTallaro, Wen Haven. I'nnn 



Wll 



N J : 

Elmer 
Miami 



\M P.. I 
J. I.urle, 



Walter B. Duryea Hawthorne N I 

Ham P. lUffnwiii. Washington D I 
1028 
Bi'iijamin a Brown, Atlantic «'im. 
M. Haaen <"oivin. Waahlngton, D C 
I" fiire. Baltimore; Meyer Bggnal 
Beach. Fla.: ir\in B Oolboro, Baltimore; 

Abraham Jacobs, Newark. N J 
1820 
George R. ciendenin. Betbeeda, 
wani C. Dobbs, Baltimore ; Jullui 

Baltimore. 

1080 
Albert Budav. Rrldcepnrt. t'unn 

1931 
Elwood R Snvder. West Orange. V J 

1932 
Charles E. Broadrup. Frederick, Md. : Ham- 
mond L. Johnston. Baltimore ; A. James Ker- 
shaw. W. Warwick. R. I. ; John II. Michael, 
Baltimore. 

1833 
Philip I,. Block. Bnlttlmore : Albert <\ Conk. 

Cumberland. Md. : Charles nj, McGany. Es- 
sex. Md. ; George E. Wheeler. Jr., San Fran.. 
Calif. 

1934 

C. Elson Burroughs. Summit, N. ,T. : Ed 

mund P. Roberts. Newark. N. J.: William 

Sehunick. Baltimore: Jesse Tracer, Raltlmore 

1835 

William W. Noel. Hagerstown, Md. 

193C> 
Samuel Hanik. Silver Spring. Md. ; William 
Kress, Baltimore. 

1937 
Joseph L. Downs, .Terser City, N. J. 

1838 
A. Bernard Eskow. Raltlmore: Ravmond 
Fields. Rethesda, Md. : Nicholas A. Gludltta, 
West field, N. J. 

1939 
Michael S. Varipatis. Essex, Md. 

1940 
Eugene L. Pessagno, Jr.. Raltlmore. 

1942 
Stewart Everson, Los Angeles, Calif. 

1943 (November! 
George V. Rlc&man. New Rrltain. Conn. ; 
Raymond K. Tongue. Jr., Towson, Md. 
1944 
George A. Graham. Miami. Fla. : Conrad 
L. Inman. Jr.. Baltimore: Anton Jacob, Jr.. 
Bridgeport. Conn. : John M. Mallow. Upper 
Tract, W. Va. ; Edward L. Wheeler. Lrnn. 
Mass. 

1946 
George Hooz, Dover. N. H. 

1947 
Clarence S. Olive. Faettevllle. N. 
ward J. Steinhof. Fall River. Mass. 
194S 
Leonard O. Copen. Boston. Mass 
S> Relchel. Baltimore. 

19.">n 
Ernesto Frontera. Coamo, P. R. 
Gale, Newark. N. J. 

1951 
Stanley R. Mallow. Pasadena, Md. 



C. : Ed- 



Myron 



Allan A. 




■•Listen, Snntkii. uou'il hitter hurry and 
get those rahes around before your fat 
gets back from lunch .'" 



19 



School of 



Pharmacy 



Adcle B. Ballman 



The School of Pharmacy held Open 
House in its main building. While 
the evening was planned particularly 
for young men and women interested in 
studying pharmacy, parents, teachers, 
and others who wished to see the school 
and meet the Student Body and Faculty 
were welcomed. There were demon- 
strations of modern scientific equip- 
ment and techniques not only in phar- 
macy, but in chemistry, physics, bac- 
teriology, and botany as well. Movies 
of both scientific work and extra- cur- 
ricular activities were shown. Arts and 
sciences course offerings were demon- 
strated. Refreshments were served free 
of charge. Guided tours continued 
every ten minutes. 

Service Representative 

Appointment of H. Dean Sulivan, '50 
Pharmacy, of Falls Church, Virginia 
to Professional Service Representative 
in Washington was announced recent- 
ly by Smith, Kline & French Labora- 
tories, Philadelphia pharmaceutical 
firm. 

Mr. Sullivan received the appoint- 
ment following successful completion 
of three months of on-the-job training 
and a comprehensive written examina- 
tion. 

He served in the Army Air Corps as 
a radio operator with the 368th 
Bombardment Group during World 
War II, is married and has two daugh- 
ters. 

Old Timer 

Charles E. Sonnenburg graduated 
from the school of Pharmacy in 1890, 
at the age of 20. He served his 
apprenticeship in the same room in 
which the first lectures of the School 
of Pharmacy were given in 1841. He 
started at the School of Medicine 
but decided that Pharmacy was more 
to his liking and has since devoted 
his entire life and effort to this field. 

In 1894, Mr. Sonnenburg acquired 
the northwest corner of Baltimore and 
Greene Streets, in Baltimore. In 1909, 
he took over the drug store at the 
northeast corner of Baltimore and Gay 
Streets continuing in the retail drug 
business until late 1921. He is a 
charter member of the present Calvert 
Drug Co. and of the Admiral Perpetual 
Loan and Savings Association. For 
many years he served as assistant 
secretary and treasurer of this organi- 
zation. 

In recognition of his service in 
Pharmacy and his interest in the school 
he was elected honorary president of 
the Alumni Association of the school 
from 1941-42. 

Extra-Curricular 

The 1953-54 session has been one of 
real progress in extra-curricular activi- 
ties. We have completely reorganized 
our Student Government Alliance and 
are trying out a new Constitution (part 




CLASS ELECTIONS 

Pharmacy students rote under the new Stu- 
ilint llliance Constitution. 



of our new Student Handbook) which 
gives our students broader privileges 
and responsibilities. The new sports 
program — featuring basketball, bowl- 
ing and Softball teams — has been ex- 
tremely popular. Two very successful 
dances were held at the Psychiatric 
Roof — one a Hallowe'en party and the 
other, the Winter Hop, was enlivened 
by an original dramatic skit put on 
by the Freshmen and the Faculty. The 
new School paper, THE MARYLAND 
MORTAR, which appears every Friday, 
is eagerly awaited and is very much 
appreciated by the students. 

New Brochure 

A new sixteen page brochure giving 
a pictoral account of education at the 
School of Pharmacy together with 
valuable information on opportunities 
in the profession is now being dis- 
tributed. The depth of pharmacy train- 
ing against the background of the 
broad advantages of Baltimore as a 
medical and cultural centre are stressed 
in this the first pharmacy school to 
offer any view book which is quite so 
extensive. 

Tea For Miss Olive 

The Administration and Faculty of 
the School gave a tea in honor of Miss 
Cole who retired November the 
thirtieth. | The Kelly Memorial was 
filled with Miss Cole's associates and 
many friends. The Faculty presented 
her with a jewelled scarab brooch and 
a huge bouquet of red roses. Miss Cole 
spoke with emotion of her long service 
with the institution and paid tribute 
to the profession she so dearly loves. 



College of 



Arts and Sciences 



Lois Eld Ernest 



Music Major 

University of Maryland students en- 
rolled in the Department of Music 
will be able to acquire a degree enabl- 
ing them to teach music on the col- 
lege level as a result of a new music 
curriculum. 

Upon completion of the new course 
of study, the music majors will re- 
ceive a Bachelor of Arts degree which, 
according to Professor Homer Ulrich, 
Head of the Music Department of the 
College of Arts and Sciences, will en- 
able them to continue their work fo- 




Qen. Burger 



course will be included in the 1954 
fall catalog and will be titled "Music 
Literature and Theory." 

Prior to the initiation of this new 
curriculum, students in music received 
a Bachelor of Science degree preparing 
them for music education in public 
schools, but not in colleges. 

"The course has strong cultural val- 
ues and will provide more theory and 
literary aspects in the field of music," 
Professor Ulrich stated. 

To H.Q., U.S.M.C. 

Brig. Gen. Joseph C. Burger (A.&S. 
'25), has been named Information Di- 
rector at Marine Corps Headquarters, 
Washington, D. C. 

Gen. Burger, former assistant Com- 
mander of the 1st Marine Division in 
Korea, played Var- 
sity football, bas- 
ketball and lacrosse 
while at Maryland. 
He has been a Ma- 
rine Corps officer 
since 1925. 

In World War II 
Gen. Burger was 
chief of staff of the 
1st Marine Amphib- 
ious Corps. At Bou- 
gainville he won the 
bronze star medal for heroic achieve- 
ment. He went to Korea last April. 

During nearly 30 years' service Gen. 
Burger has had duty in China, Hawaii 
and various posts and stations in the 
United States and Cuba. He also has 
had duty at Marine Corps headquarters 
here. 

Gen. Burger is married to the former 
Frances Freeny (Education '28), of 
Salisbury, Md. They have two children. 

On Baltimore Board 

Dr. Norman R. Roth, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Sociology, was appointed a 
member of the Advisory Commission 
on Area Projects in Baltimore City. 
The purposes of the Area Projects are 
"to discover and develop leadership, to 
aid in coordinating services and activi- 
ties, to discover gaps in service, to pro- 
mote participation in activities, to 
eliminate from the community any con- 
ditions or practices contributing to de- 
linquency, and to assist and cooperate 
with other agencies, departments and 
organizations." The advisory commis- 
sion was formed so as to advise the 
Department of Welfare (Baltimore 
City) on all management and other 
activities within the control of the 
Area Projects and to recommend rules 
and regulations for the government of 
Area Projects not inconsistent with 
Charter and Ordinances of the City. 

Dr. Alfven Honored 

World famed astrophysicist, Dr. 
Hannes O. Alfven, visiting Research 
Professor in the Physics Department 
and the Institute for Fluid Dynamics 
and Applied Mathematics at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, was honored at 
the annual banquet of the University's 
chapter of Sigma Pi Sigma, when 
Dr. Alfven received honorary member- 
ship in Sigma Pi Sigma, in recognition 
ward Master's and PhD. degrees. The 



20 



"Maryland:' 



of his achievements in physics. 

Dr. Alfven is famous as the founder 
of the field of magneto-hydrodynamics, 
the theory of coupled hydrodynamics 
and electromagnetic phenomena. Dr. 
Alfven has developed the theory of the 
origin and behavior of sun spots and 
is one of the leading authorities on the 
source of the cosmic radiation. He is 
also the author of authoritative 
tieatises "On the Origin of the Solar 
System" and "Cosmical Electrody- 
namics," and of more than fifty other 
scientific publications. Dr. Alfven is 
on leave this year from his permanent 
position as Professor of Electronics 
and Director of the Laboratory for 
Electronics at the Royal Institute of 
Technology in Stockholm, Sweden. 

At the banquet physics students 
whose outstanding records merit mem- 
bership were initiated. They were: 
Graduate Students: John C. Flannagan, 
Benjamin H. Harrison, Charles Alfred 
Robert, Jr., Robert J. Miller, Roger P. 
Kohin, Louis F. Libelo, Charles P. 
Poole, Murray Scheibe, David C. Schu- 
bert, and David J. O'Keefe, as well as 
transfer members: Dr. James L. Ander- 
son, Dr. Elliott Montroll, Raymond H. 
Phodes, Mrs. Rosemary T. McGinnies, 
and faculty members: Dr. Edwin 
Resler, and Dr. S. Fred Singer. 

Dr. Alfven, lectured recently at Har- 
vard, Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, and Brown University on his 
theories of magnetohydrodynamics and 
the origin of the cosmic radiation. 

C. of S., MarCorps Schools 
Colonel Robert B. Luckey, (A & S 
'27) is Chief of Staff at Marine Corps 
Schools, Quantico, Va., he has served 
twenty-eight years in the marines, 
mostly as an artillery officer. 

Colonel Luckey was awarded the 
Legion of Merit for service in the 
Okinawa campaign where he command- 
ed the Fifteenth Marines (artillery) 
in the Sixth Marine Division. He also 
won the Bronze Star Medal twice . . . 
during the Cape Gloucester campaign 
and in the occupation of Tsingtao, 
North China. 

Colonel Luckey was commissioned a 
second lieutenant in the Marine Corps 
in 1927. 

He served in Nicaragua for two tours 
of duty 1927-8 and 1930, and, over the 
years, at the Naval 
Academy, Norfolk 
Navy Yard, U. S. S. 
Utah, Peiping, 
China, Quantico, 
Guantanamo Bay, 
Cuba, Camp Le- 
jeune, N. C, and 

fNew Zealand. 
^^ He landed at 
jA J I Guadalcanal and 

JB I reached the rank of 

' lieutenant colonel 
on the day of the 
landing, August 7, 
Col. Luckey 1942 

He became Executive Officer, 
Eleventh Marines, and participated in 
the Cape Gloucester operation. Later 




he served as Director, Artillery School, 
Quantico. 

Appointed a Colonel on September 
30, 1943, he commanded the 15th 
Marines, and won the Legion of Merit 
during the Okinawa campaign and the 
Bronze Star Medal for his part played 
in the China occupation. 

He graduated from the Naval W.u 
College, Newport, Rhode Island, in 
July, 1947. 

Earlier Duties 

Colonel Luckey became successively 
Commanding Officer, Fourth Marines, 
in July, Tenth Marines with additional 
duty as Division Artillery Officer, 
Second Marine Division, Marine Bar- 
racks, Washington, D. C. He was G-3 
of the Second Marine Division Chief 
of Staff for the Division, coming to 
Quantico in June, 1953. 

In addition to the Legion of Merit, 
Bronze Star Medal and Gold Star in 
lieu of a Second Bronze Star Medal, 
Colonel Luckey lists among his decora- 
tions and medals, the Presidential Unit 
Citation; Navy Unit Commendation; 
American Defense Service Medal ; 
American Campaign Medal; Asiatic- 
Pacific Campaign Medal; World War II 
Victory Medal; China Service Medal; 
Second Nicaraguan Campaign Medal; 
Nicaraguan Medal of Merit and Cita- 
tion, and the Chinese Order of the 
Cloud and Banner. 

He is married to Mrs. Carry W. 
Luckey. They have a daughter, Laura 
C, 11, and two sons, Thomas W., 15, 
and William C, 3. 

Psychology Conference 

At Friendship International Airport 
the Department of Psychology, pre- 
sented the Third Annual Conference of 
Maryland Industries, on the topic "Psy- 
chological Contributions to Industrial 
Management." 

Subjects discussed included: "Are 
Sales Executives Blazing the Trail?", 
"The Human Factor in Accident Re- 
duction," "Some Aspects of Manage- 
ment Union Relations," "A Resume of 
Psychological Con- 
tributions to Indus- 
trial Management," 
and "Building the 
Bridge from Re- 
search to Practice." 
Speakers included 
Mr. William N. Far- 
lie, Merchandising 
Manager, Delaware, 
District of Colum- 
bia, Maryland Dis- 
trict, Esso Standard 
Oil Co.; Mr. John J. 
Costello, Industrial 
Relations Supt., Kaiser Aluminum and 
Chemical Corporation; Mr. Leo C. 
Mullan, Personnel Manager, General 
Elevator Co., Inc.; Mr. G. Hudson 
Quarles, Personnel Manager, The Black 
and Decker Manufacturing Company; 
Mr. Joseph G. Weisinger, Personnel 
Manager, Sherwood Brothers, Inc. 

Speakers for the University of Mary- 
land included Dr. T. G. Andrews, Head 
of the University's Psychology De- 
partment; Dr. Roy K. Heintz, Dr. Sher- 
man Ross, Dr. Arthur W. Ayers, Dr. 




Dr. Andrews 



>"-" 



j tkck_ 




John W. Gustad, and l>r. Kay C. Huck- 

man, all of the Psychology Depart- 
ment. 

Panel members included : Mr. Arthur 

C. Holmes, Vice President in Cha 
of Personnel, U. S. Fidelity and <• ■ 
anty Co.; M i . Bdgai D. I Is 
nel Director, the < !ity Baking Co.; hfi 
John S. Kos/ei, Manage] fodu trial R< 
lations, Mathieson Chemical Corp.; Hi 
Donald < '. Russel, Pei onnel I tirectoi . 
Kilicott Machine Corp.; and Dr. Arthur 
W. Ayers. 

In Chicago 

I lean Peon P. Smith attended a 

. . . , National Edu- 

cation associs 

t i o n con!' 

ance in Chi- 
cago. 

.^ A ]) p r o x- 

i in a t e 1 y 40 

fa groups repre- 

i«w senting the 

entire country 

were present. 

Dean Smith 
acted as an- 
alyst for a 
group which 
considered the 
Dean Smith q u e s t i ons: 

"How can colleges and universities 
meet the ever increasing demands for 
both general and specialized educa- 
tion?" 

Manning Speaks 
Dr. Charles Manning, Assistant Dean 
of the College of Arts and Sciences 
spoke on "General Education: Its Pur- 
pose and Values," at a meeting of the 
Physical Education Division of the 
National Education Association in 
Washington. 

In St. Louis 
Warren B. Bezanson, Instructor in 
English, attended the Annual Spring 
Meeting of the Conference on College 
Composition and Communication (Na- 
tional Council of Teachers of English), 
held at St. Louis, Missouri. Dr. Bezan- 
son served as co-secretary of Work- 
shop 10, " Writing from Source Mate- 
rials — The Documented Paper." 

European Tour 

Dr. Adolph E. Z'ucker, head of the 
foreign languages department, com- 
pleted a 4-week 
tour of European 
colleges at the 
| invitation of the 
west German 
government. 

Dr. Zucker was 
one of 80 Ameri- 
c a n university 
professors hon- 
ored with an in- 
vitation to par- 
ticipate in the 
goodwill trip. 
Dr. Zucker was 
granted leave of 
absence from his position at the Uni- 
versity to take part in the study tour. 
The educators traveled in groups 
of eight, in line with their special 
interests. 




Dean Zucker 



"Maryland" 



21 



At Brown University 

Dr. S. Fred Singer recently delivered 

ilk entitled "'Origin and Age of 

Meteorite's' at the Department of 

Physics, Brown University, Providence, 

Rhode Island. 



At Syracuse 

At Syracuse University Dr. James 
Anderson delivered two talks entitled 
•(iieens Functions in Quantum Field 
Theory" and "Recent Developments in 
Quantum Field Theory" at the Physics 
Department General and Theoretical 
Colloquiums. 

Dr. Aaron D. Krumbein, Assistant 
Professor of Physics, represented the 
University at a University Research 
Reactor Conference at Oak Ridge, Ten- 
nessee. 

"Street Scene" 

Miss Barbara A. Scher, major in the 
Department of Art, won the March 
Painting-of-the-Month club award with 
her oil entitled "Street Scene." Every 
year four paintings are selected from 
the work of all art department stu- 
dents. Each student selected becomes 
a member of the exclusive Painting-of- 
the Month Club. One painting is placed 
on exhibit in the Administration Build- 
ing for one month during the spring 
semester. 

Miss Scher, a senior and member of 
the Alpha Epsilon Phi sorority, de- 
veloped an early interest in art. She 
won a prize last year in the Annual 
Exhibition for a charcoal drawing and 
has contributed her talents as a mem- 
ber of the stage crews for various Uni- 
versity Theater productions. Her am- 
bition is to become associated with ad- 
vertising or illustration work. 

Honor Graduate 

Corporal Robert W. Palter, who at- 
tended A&S up to '52, was named hon- 
or graduate of the 226th Ordnance 
Base Depot supply school in Korea. 

Corporal Palter, a special projects 
and reports clerk with the 59th Ord- 
nance Group, entered the Army in 
September 1952, completed basic train- 
ing at Aberdeen, Md., and arrived over- 
seas in April 1953. 

Dr. Stromberg's Book 

Dr. Roland Stromberg of the Depart- 
ment of History, Assistant Professor 
in the European Program has had his 
doctoral dissertation published recent- 
ly by the Oxford University Press. It 
was entitled "Religious Liberalism in 
the Eighteenth Century England." 

With Goodyear 

Alfred M. Fort, Jr., Class of '51, 
of Catonsville, resigned as Merchan- 
dising, Sales Promotion and Public- 
Relations Manager for the Shell Oil 
Co. in Western North Carolina, to join 
the Field Sales staff of the Goodyear 
Tire and Rubber Co. in Charlotte, N. C. 
Mr. Fort and his wife, the former Mar- 
garet Swicegood, of Asheville, N. C, 
reside in Kastover, N. C. 




MISS MARYLAND '54 

(NANCY MULARKBY) 

Nanr/i Mularkey, 20-year-old junior in Arts 
ami Sciences, was crowned Miss Maryland 
of l!»r>4 ui the Junior Prom by Bill Holland, 
Terrapin editor. 

itir picture woe ohoeen by John Robert 
Powers Modeling agency from over 47 other 
candidates' pictures. 

Miss Mularkey was a former Sophomore 
queen, one fit the ten prettiest coeds in 
interim last year, a finalist in the DBK 
sponsored queen contest, and is also an Air 
Force ROTO angel. 

Powers said he made his decision on the 
basis of Miss M ulnrkey's "naturalness," her 
facial contours, her alertness and apparent 
in telligence. 

Powers said that it teas difficult choice to 
make because there were so many lovely girls 
entered in the contest. He selected runners- 
ii ji as I Az MeDaniels, 20, senior in B&PA, 
and Hue Qarner, 20, senior in Home Ec. 



To S.C.P.A. 



Dr. Kenon F. McCormick, Assistant 
Professor of Psychology, has been ap- 
pointed a member of the Program 
Committee for the 1954 Southern Col- 
lege Personnel Association, to take 
place in Williamsburg, Virginia. 

Dr. Ayers 

Dr. Arthur W. Ayers, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Industrial Psychology, re- 
cently spoke on "Criteria for Evalu- 
ating Training Programs" for the 
Maryland Society of Training Direc- 
tors and "The Employment Interview" 
at a meeting of the Women's Person- 
nel Association. 

At N.Y.U. 

Dr. J. B. Diaz, Associate Research 
Professor, Mathematics, lectured at 
the Institute for Mathematics and 
Mechanics at New York University on 
"On the Euler-Poisson-Darboux Equa- 
tion." 



DEFINITIONS 

An optimist laughs to forget. A 
pessimist forgets to laugh. A optimist 
expect* to find a pearl hi his oysters. 
A pensiinist expects ptomaine poisoning. 



Lectures On Emerson 

Professor Carl Bode of the English 
Department lectured on Ralph Waldo 
Emerson before the Washington Ethi- 
cal Society recently. His lecture was 
part of a series on "Molders of Ameri- 
can Thought." 

In Michigan 

Dr. Melville S. Green Department 
of Physics, attended meetings of the 
Division of Solid State Physics of the 
American Physical Society at Detroit 
and Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

N.S.F. Fellowship 

Mr. Leo Schlegel, a senior Mathe- 
matics major in the College of Arts 
and Sciences, has been awarded a pre- 
doctoral fellowship by the National 
Science Foundation to do graduate 
work in Mathematics in the coming 
academic year. Mr. Schlegel has not 
yet definitely decided where he will 
pursue his graduate studies, but is con- 
sidering the University of Chicago. 

Phi Alpha Theta 

Fifteen students have been elected 
to the University's Chapter (Beta 
Omega) of Phi Alpha Theta, the Na- 
tional honorary history fraternity for 
those whose work in the field of his- 
tory has been outstanding. There are 
125 chapters of this fraternity in lead- 
ing colleges and universities. 

Elected were: Marianne H. Allen, 
Hermann C. Bainder, Richard Ray 
Berger, Christopher Dell, Warren Kie- 
fer, Julian P. Lawson, Phyllis S. Levy, 
Edgar G. deLaski, Cecil J. Mann, Fred- 
erick J. Meyer, James A. Myatt, Frank 
Pruden, Frank S. Trout, Minna F. Win- 
stein, and Phillip A. Wheaten. 

Wins Bronze Star 

Second Lt. Ralph H. Barnes a junior 
in the College of Arts and Sciences 
and a member of the District Air 
National Guard was recently awarded 
the Bronze Star during ceremonies at 
Andrews A. F. B. The award was 
presented as a result of his service 
as a platoon leader in the 15th regi- 
ment 3rd Infantry Division. The action 
in which he participated was in Korea 
and it also brought him the Nation's 
second highest combat decoration, the 
distinguished Service Cross. 

At Wisconsin 

Dr. J. L. Bates and Dr. Patrick W. 
Riddleberger, both instructors in the 
History Department, presented papers 
on the program of the Mississippi Val- 
ley Historical Association at Madison, 
Wisconsin. The title of Dr. Bates' paper 
was "The Teapot Scandal of Politics"; 
that of Dr. Riddleberger's was "George 
W. Julian: Abolitionist Land Reform- 
er". Four other former members of 
the History Staff in recent years were 
participants in the programs of these 
meetings. 

At Tau Beta Pi 

Dr. Bruce L. Melvin, Department of 
Sociology, spoke on "Culture and the 
Engineer" at the annual initiation ban- 
quet of Tau Beta Pi, honorary en- 
gineering fraternity, recently. 



22 



"Maryland" 



School of 



Dr. John Wagner 



Cancer Research 

A scientist from the University of 
Maryland's School of Medicine 
has discovered that a high incidence of 
virus-caused breast cancer in one 
strain of mice has shifted suddenly 
to include leukemia, cancer of the 
blood and blood-forming organs. 

This phenomenon was disclosed by 
the American Cancer Society, whose 
Maryland Division supports research 
by the scientist, Dr. Frank H. J. 
Figge. 

The cancer change occurred in a 
standard strain of mice, C3H, in which 
95 per cent of the females normally 
develop breast cancer. Scientists else- 
where have found that one of the con- 
ditions which lead to breast cancer is 
the passage of virus, usually in nurs- 
ing, from mother to offspring. 

The spectacular shift occurred in a 
single generation. Seventy per cent 
of the males and 60 per cent of the 
females in the changed mice now 
develop an acute leukemia which kills 
them about a week or so after symp- 
toms appear. When the leukemic tissue 
is transplanted to other mice, it runs 
a slower course — to 24 to 60 days. 

The leukemia is so virulent that it 
can be transplanted to some other 
strains and hybrids normally resistant 
to leukemia. 

Dr. Figge now is trying to establish 
the cause of the new type of cancer. 
It might be due to a change (mutation) 
of a gene in an egg or sperm of one 
of the parents or to a change in the 
virus which normally brings on breast 
cancer or to the introduction of another 
virus in the strain. 

"Fat Mice" Experiment 

The American Cancer Society also 
anounced that a strain of fat mice, 
which behave like fat people, has been 
found by Dr. Figge. 

The obese mice were produced by 
mating two mice of normal size. More 
than half of the progeny resulting from 
these hybrids were overweight. They 
tip the scales at anywhere from 40 to 
80 grams, as compared with the 30 
gram average of either parent strain. 

As in humans, the mice may be 
normal in size and shape until after 
maturity. Then they start putting on 
the grams. The period after their 
youth is marked by the mouse equiva- 
lent of prominent middle-age spread 
and portly paunch. And only when they 
reach extreme old age do they show 
any inclination to reduce. Then they 
tend to emaciation. 

The mice lose their mating urge and 
ability to have offspring as they put 
on weight; and, according to prelimin- 
ary observations, become suscepible to 
an extraordinary number of chronic 
diseases, including some kinds of can- 
cer. Dr. Figge has succeeded in intro- 



ducing into this strain, a virus-caused 
breast eancer and a form of leukemia 

to which the parent fat strain was not 

particularly susceptible. 

No conclusions have been reached 
as yet on the incidence of spontaneous, 
cancels and other chronic conditions. 

Fat humane have none cancer, heart 

disease, and diabetes than do skinny 

people. 

The fat mice age early ;md die BOOD 
er than their slimmer brothers and 
sisters. 

Medical Director 

Colonel William S. Stone, comman- 
dant of the Army Medical Service 
Graduate School at the Walter Reed 
Army Medical Center, has been named 
director of medical 
research and educa- 
tion of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 

The position, a 
new one created in 
this year's budget, is 
that of director of 
both the University 
Hospital and the 
university's School 
of Medicine. 

Colonel Stone is 
52 years old, is mar- 
ried and has two 
children. He has been a medical officer 
in the Army since 1929. Among the po- 
sitions he held before his assignment 
at Walter Reed was that of chief of 
the preventive medicine division in the 
Air Surgeon's Office. During the war, 
he was consultant and chief of pre- 
ventive medicine in the Mediterranean 
theater of operations. 

He graduated from the University 
of Louisville in 1929 and entered the 
Army Medical School in 1931. Colonel 
Stone is married and has two sons, 
William, 17 and Robert 15. 

Dr. T. B. Symons, acting president 
of the university, said the Colonel had 
been recommended by medical authori- 
ties in every part of the country. 

Dr. Pincoffs Named 

The Board of Regents also named Dr. 
Maurice C. Pincoffs as head of the De- 
partment of Preventive Medicine and 
Rehabilitation in the medical school. 




Colonel Stone 




"Well, maybe Aunt Marthi/'s home remedy 
won't cure a cold, but it does take your mind 
off of it I" 



i : In new department to carry on 
the state chronic ram. 

Also appointed vraa Dr. I 

Woodward as professor and head of 
the department of medicine. 

Vision Conference 

The Rnt Occupational Vision Con- 
ference, sponsored by the Univei 
and cooperating agencies, took place at 

the Medical and ( h iru rgical Faculty 

Building of the [Tniversitj at Balti- 
more. 

This conference was of particular 
interest to management repress Qta 
of industry and commerce, M well as 

safety directors, personnel mana; ■ 
heads of medical departments, opthal- 
mologists, optometrists, and illuini 
ing engineers. It was open to anyone 
interested in the subject of occupa- 
tional vision. 

The purpose of the conference was 
to acquqaint those attending with 
modern techniques in measuring visual 
qualifications of employees and appli- 
cation of such techniques for more 
effective selection and placement, in- 
creased production, reduced waste of 
materials and work rejects, better 
safety performance, less labor turn- 
over, lower training costs, improved 
employer-employee relations and re- 
duced absenteeism. 

Speakers for the various sessions 
included Herbert W. Hoover, Manager, 
Accident Prevention Department, Mary- 
land Casualty Company; Lowell F. 
Johnson, Asst. to Vice President, 
American Home Products Corporation; 
New York; H. Boyd Wylie, M. D., 
Dean, Medical School, University of 
Maryland; Clifford F. Burniss, Safety 
Director, International Business 
Machines Corp., Endicott, New York; 
James I. Moore, M. D., Baltimore, 
Maryland; Ralph S. McLaughlin, M. D., 
Charleston, West Virginia; Walter E. 
Fleischer, M. D., Medical Director, 
Rustless Division, Armco Steel Cor- 
poration, Baltimore, Maryland; Leon 
Brody, Ph. D., Director of Research, 
Center for Safety Education, New York 
University; S. S. Steinberg, Ph. D., 
Dean, College of Engineering, Univer- 
sity of Maryland; Commander R. R. 
Sullivan, Head, Optometry Section, 
Medical Service Corps, Bureau of Medi- 
cine and Surgery, U. S. Navy; Syl- 
vester K. Guth, In Charge of Lighting 
Research, General Electric Company, 
Nela Park, Cleeland, Ohio; Louise L. 
Sloan, Ph. D., Associate Professor of 
Phsiological Optics, Wilmer Institute, 
The Johns Hopkins Hospital; E. H. 
Westland, O. D., Chairman Occupa- 
tional Vision Committee, American 
Optometric Association; Herman C. 
Kline, O. D., New Haven, Connecticut; 
and Roland V. Merrifield, Assistant 
Secretary, Air Reduction Company, 
Inc., New York City. 

Subjects covered included: Benefits 
of An Occupational Vision Program; 
Improved Industrial Relations; Vision 
in Industry; Efficient Vision as a Pro- 
ductive Tool; Chemical Eye Injuries; 
Welding Flash Eye Injuries: Import- 
ance of Vision in Motor Vehicle Opera- 



"Afarytond" 



28 



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tion; Occupational Vision Programs 

in the U. S. Navy Installations; Light- 
ing and Seeing; The Color Blind 
Worker; How to Set Up and Operate 
Corrective Protective Vision Programs 
— Small and Large Plants. 

Pediatric Seminar 

The third annual Pediatric Seminar 
was held at the University Hospital, 
under the auspices of the University Of 
Maryland's School of Medicine, De- 
partment of Pediatrics. 

Subjects covered included: The Man- 
agement of Common Pediatric Cardiac 
Diseases; Practical Aspects of Liver 
Diseases in Pediatrics; Early Diagnosis 
and Treatment of Tuberculosis in Chil- 
dren; Some Dermatologic Problems 
Seen in Pediatric Practice. 

Speakers included: Dr. J. Edmund 
Bradley, Head of the Pediatrics De- 
partment; Dr. Harriet Guild, Associate 
Professor Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins 
Hospital; Dr. Rachel Ash, Associate 
Professor of Pediatric Cardiology, Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania School of 
Medicine; Dr. Sydney S. Gellis, Assis- 
tant Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard 
Medical School Senior Physician, Chil- 
dren's Medical Center, Boston; Dr. C. 
Loring Joslin, Professor of Pediatrics, 
University Hospital; Dr. Edwin L. Ken- 
dig, Jr., Assistant Professor of Pedi- 
atrics, University of Virginia Medical 
College; and Dr. Marion B. Sulzberger, 
Professor and Chairman, Department 
of Dermatology and Syphilology, New 
York University Postgraduate Medical 
School and Director of the New York 
Skin and Cancer Unit. 

Schering Award 

The Schering Corporation announces 
the subjects upon which medical stu- 
dents will compete in 1954. 

To encourage medical students in the 
ever expanding fields of therapy, the 
Schering Award Committee has an- 
nounced the ninth consecutive competi- 
tion for 1954. 

Titles of the three subjects on which 
students in the United States and Can- 
ada are invited to submit papers have 
been released by George Babcock, Jr., 
M.D., chairman of the committee. They 
are: 

1) The Use of Androgen Therapy 

in the Female 

2) The Prophylactic and Therapeu- 

tic Uses of Parenteral Anti- 
histamines 

3) Modern Treatment of Infections 

and Allergic Disorders of the 

Eye 
For the best paper on each of these 
subjects, the committee will present 
one $500 first prize and a $250 second 
prize. Special citations and profes- 
sionally useful gifts will also be 
awarded to all students who submit 
papers of merit. Outstanding medical 
authorities in each field will judge the 
papers. 

Deadline for entry forms specifying 
the student's chosen title is July 1. All 
manuscripts must be mailed not later 
than October 1. Students may compete 
individually or cooperatively in re- 
search teams. 

The purpose of the Schering Award 
is to encourage reporting in the hope 
that students will later contribute to 

"Maryland" 



the essential communications of knowl- 
edge throughout the medical profes- 
sion. 

The Schering Award Committee will 
bring outstanding papers to the atten- 
tion of editors of appropriate profes- 
sional journals. Information and in- 
structions for the competition are 
available from Schering Corporation, 2 
Broad Street, Bloomfield, New Jersey. 

At Oak Ridge 

Dr. Frederick Ferguson, Associate 
Professor of Physiology at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Medical School, 
is at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for the 
purpose of studying techniques of us- 
ing radioisotopes in physiological re- 
search. 

Thirty-two research workers through- 
out the country enrolled in the four- 
week course being conducted by the 
Special Training Division of the Oak 
Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies. 

The Institute has been offering sim- 
ilar courses for five years. Its pur- 
pose is to instruct research workers in 
universities, industrial and govern- 
ment laboratories and hospitals in the 
techniques of handling radioisotopes. 

Using Isotopes 

Dr. Ferguson is using isotopes in 
physiological research, particularly as 
they relate to plasma salts and plasma 
volume. Radioisotopes are valuable 
aids in blood and plasma research be- 
cause they emit energy in the form of 
radiation. This radiation may be lo- 
cated and measured at any stage of a 
physiological process, thus enabling 
scientists to follow developments more 
closely. 

Dr. Ferguson is a graduate of Wes- 
leyan University and the University 
of Minnesota, where he received his 
Ph.D. in Physiology. 

Librarians Meet 

The library staff of Medicine, Dentis- 
try, Pharmacy, Nursing, and Psychia- 
try was host to the Baltimore Chap- 
ter of the Special Libraries Associa- 
tion. The meeting was held in the 
Psychiatric Institute Library, with Dr. 
John C. Krantz, Jr., Professor of Phar- 
macology of the School of Medicine, as 
speaker of the evening. 



!ga&. -<^^? 




New Dormitories 

Under construction and nearing com- 
pletion are three new dormitories for 
men consisting of 16 typical units, with 
capacity for 800 students, and three 
new dormitories for women, consisting 
of 9 typical units and designed to house 
47(5 students. 

Named for Maryland counties the 
men's dormitories will be known as 
Montgomery, Charles and Alleghany 
Halls, while the women's dormitories 
will be designated as Caroline, Wicomi- 
co and Carroll Halls. 



School of 



Nursing 

Barbara Ardis 



"They were trained by an efficiency ex- 
pert. This 9 o'clock coffee keeps them awake 
until noon." 



Excellent Job 

A look into the past and future 
shows very interesting alumnae 
meetings. We are very anxious to in- 
crease our membership, and looking 
for an incentive to increase our month- 
ly attendance, we think Joyce Johnson, 
Chairman of the Program Committee 
has done an excellent job in preparing 
the programs for this year. 

The March meeting featured a movie 
on cardiac surgery as performed at 
the University Hospital. Dr. R. A. 
Cowley and Dr. L. Scherlis dialogued 
the movie relating their latest achieve- 
ments and discoveries. 

The senior student nurses have been 
invited to attend the April meeting 
in an effort to introduce them to the 
Alumnae Association. A brief business 
meeting will be followed by a showing 
of color slides taken by Maria Sa- 
gardia, class of 1943, during her trip 
to Europe. 

The feature of the May meeting will 
be showing of films from the Maryland 
Society for Medical Research, "The 
Lady with the Lamp" and "Frontiers 
in Medical Research." The former is 
a recruitment film for nurses narrated 
by Elizabeth Rohr Singleton, '47. 

The Alumnae members have been 
having dinner together in the Hospital 
dining room at 6:00 p.m. on meeting 
nights. 

All of this proves to be great fun. 

In Seattle 

Dr. and Mrs. John E. Goeckler, and 
their two small daughters, are living 
ing in Seattle. They returned from a 
tour of duty in Germany. Dr. Goeckler 
is resident in Orthopedic Surgery at the 
University of Washington. Mrs. Goeck- 
ler was Harriet Smith, class 1947. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Marshall, are 
living in Arlington, Va. Mrs. Marshall 
was Frances Anita Jones, '43. 

Eleanor L. Gordner, '43, has been 
promoted to Captain in the A.N.C. She 
is stationed at Brooke Army Hospital, 
Fort Sam Houston, Texas, and is In- 
structor in Advanced Medicine Tech- 
nician School. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Price, and 
their two children, Sara Jane, age 
six, and James Edward, age four, are 



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"Maryland" 



26 



living in West Chester, Pa. Mrs. Price 
was Frances Danby Williams, '43. 

In Germany 

Captain and Mrs. George R. Hurrl, 
are stationed in Germany. Mrs. Hurd 
was Clara Gertrude Lebeck, '43. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy S. Melvin, and 
their three children have moved into 
their new home at Reese Road, West- 
minster. Mrs. Mehin writes, "We are 
thoroughly enjoying the many riches 
the rural life offers and trust that our 
friends will find an oportunity to share 
it with us." Mrs. Melvin was Rita 
Kent, '46. 

After many years we were able to 
the correct address of Mrs. W. 
Thomas Hadden, residence; 10 Water- 
loo Road, Half-Way Tree, Jamacia, 
B.W.I. Mrs. Hadden writes, "I have 
two children, a girl, Sheila Barbara, 
age 16, in school in Glasgow, Scotland, 
and a boy, William Dennis, age 11, in 
school in Kingston, Jamacia." Mrs. 
Hadden was married in 1937, and did 
private duty nursing before her marri- 
age. She graduated in '29. 

In Delaware 

Mrs. James G. Disharoon, nee Dor- 
othy Jean Nelson, '44, has a position 
with the District Public Health Nurs- 
ing Department in Washington, D. C. 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Manley, 
moved into their new home at 3813 
Nancy Ave., Wilmington 8, Delaware, 
on February 1, 1954. Mrs. Manley was 
Mildred Morne, Class 1949. 

Mrs. Jack C. Smith, writes, "I en- 
joyed the Bulletin very much." And, 
she also adds, we have two lovely lit- 
tle daughters, Stephanie, born Sept. 
3, 1949 in the Canal Zone, and Sherrie, 
bom January 2, 1951, in San Diego, 
Cal. Mrs. Smith was Judy Garland, 
Class 1946. 

Mrs. Marjorie McCann Brown, Class 
1944, writes, "I am still in the serv- 
ice, teaching in a practical nurse school, 
staffed by the army for army per- 
sons, either men or women. The school 
is accredited by the state and nation- 
ally, and it seems to be part of the 
answer of the way to take care of 
the shortage of trained persons in the 
Army hospitals. Surprisingly enough, 
the course is of more interest to the 
soldiers than to the WAC. The school 
course is 48 weeks long, and the grad- 
uates take their state boards before 
they leave for a new station. It has 
been very interesting to do this type 
of teaching." 

Mrs. John A. Smith, writes, "I am 
the evening supervisor at St. Vincent's 
Hospital, and enjoy it very much." 
St. Vincent's is a private Psychiatric 
Hospital with 250 beds. A large build- 
ing program is underway for a new 
acute hospital. This is the first time 
in its 128 years of existence that the 
Daughters of Charity have ever asked 
for help, and the respons has been 
overwhelming. Mrs. Smith was Eloise 
Kindig, Class 1944. 

Miss Jean F. Elmore, Class 1953, has 
a position at the Medical Center Hos- 
pital, in Richmond, Virginia. 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Davis, and 
three children, live in Clarksburg, Md. 

26 



Mrs. Davis was Alice Garrison, Class 
1938. 

Miss Martha Bush Michael, Class 
1893, is living with her sister, Mrs. 
W. D. Williamson, in Roanoke Va., 
since Miss Michael had a slight stroke 
in June 1952. Mrs. Williamson writes, 
"She is weak, but not helpless." 

Miss Ivery Reiter, Class 1952, has a 
position in Dr. Erwin R. Jennings of- 
fice in Brunswick, Georgia. She says 
she loves the Southern Hospitality. 

Mrs. Herbert Zimmerman, nee Ce- 
celia Moore, Class 1918, writes, "I 
don't have any exciting news about my- 
self. I am still married to the same 
guy, and we are both well and happy. 
My son is 23 years old and will grad- 
uate the first of June from St. Louis 
University Medical School. So we are 
real proud of him. Give my best love 
to all of the girls." 

Miss A. Carol Grimes, Class 1953, 
has a position on the staff at the 
Springfield State Hospital, Sykesville, 
Md. 

In California 

Mrs. Louis Klag, nee Joan Cowles, 
Class 1948, has been working general 
duty in the Chula Vista Hospital, in 
Chula Vista, California, while her hus- 
band has been in the service. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene R. Zimmer- 
man, and two children, Lynn Robert, 
and Dale Regis, age two and three 
years old, are living in Kensington, 
Md. Mrs. Zimmerman was Amber 
Arnold, Class 1946. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Tether, and 
daughter, Dacyl Lain, who was two 
years old in April, are living in College 
Park, Md. Mrs. Tether was Beverly 
Hoxie, Class 1953. 

Miss Louise Ada Baugher, Class 
1952, is doing general duty at the York 
Hospital, York, Pa. 

Mrs. Carl R. Thayer, Class 1953, 
nee Helena Ramsburg, is on duty in 
the delivery room in the Blaunt Me- 
morial Hospital in Maryville, Tenn. 
Mrs. Thayer says, "Maryville is lo- 
cated at the foot of the great Smokie 
Mountains, and invites anyone pass- 
ing that way to stop and visit her." 

Mrs. Edwin J. Austin is President of 
the Mothers' Club of J.H.S. No. 73, 
in Maspeth, Long Island, N. Y. Mrs. 
Austin says this organization is com- 
parable to a P.T.A. Mrs. Austin was 
Ruth Misener, Class 1943. 

Stork Expected 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Price, are 
expecting their third child in July. 
Mrs. Price was Frances D. Williams, 
Class 1943. 

Mrs. Louis G. Penn, sister of Mrs. 
Daniel Cruz, writes us that her sister, 
who is living in Anchorage, Alaska, 
says, spring is just around the corner. 
Mrs. Penn says her sister seems most 
happy with her family and home, and 
enjoys their cabin at the lake, plus 
fishing, boating and swimming in the 
summer. The whole family goes in for 
boating, and even the older girl, Bar- 
bara Ann, who is only seven years 
old can handle a boat on the lake. Mrs. 
Cruz graduated in 1937. 



£a ^HX '^^ V C mm^KrXi 


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CAMPUS QUEEN 

Miss Barbara Baker. 19, of Masxnpcqua, 
\. v., sophomore in Home Economics, repre- 
Rented the University of Maryland in New 

) ark in the Eastern Campus Quern contest. 
Miss linker is a member oj Kappa Kappa 
Coin ma. 

Miss Baker teas chosen lit) New York judges 
from photographs of eight finalists submitted 
lii/ the Diainondbaek in the New York Jour- 
nal-American's ■'Cam/ins Queen contest." 

At the Merchant Marine, Academy, Kings 
Point, New York, she competed with national 
coeds from twenty-nine other eastern colleges 
for the title of national campus quern and 
reached the finals. The contest tons won by 
Cynthia Blaine, of St. Johns, Brooklyn. 



College of 



Home Economics 

Ruth Lee Thompson Clark and 



Spring Reunion 

The annual spring reunion will be held 
May 15 starting at 10 a.m., in 
the Maryland Room. This year, more 
than ever, good participation is ex- 
pected due to the anticipated presenta- 
tion of the portrait of Dean Marie 
Mount which will take place after 
lunch. Last year this project was un- 
dertaken by the alumni group and has 
been seen to completion by the hard- 
working Mary Riley Langford, Portrait 
Chairman. As usual there will be a 
business meeting. The nominations 
committee submits the names of Mrs. 
Laura "Betty" Amos Bull, Mrs. Vera 
Klein Woods, and Mrs. Agnes McNutt 
Kricker to be considered to serve on 
the Alumni Board for a 3 year term. 
The alumni award to an outstanding 
senior will be presented and four 
awards to outstanding graduates. Mrs. 
John L. Whitehurst will receive a 
special citation. The graduating sen- 
iors will be honored with a small re- 
ception before lunch. 

Hazel Tenney Tuemmler will be on 
hand with a Special Spring Sale of 
Home Ec. Baskets and Trays that day. 

Reservations go to the Alumni Of- 

"Maryland" 



fice. Lunch will be $1.50 payable at 
registration. 

Personal Items 

Elizabeth Howard, graduate of 1953, 
brought a Fashion Show from Wood- 
ward and Lothrop's to the campus on 
March 17. The show was sponsored by 
the Campus Club. Elizabeth was com- 
mentator for the show and Claire 
Densford, also a graduate of 1953 as- 
sisted with the garments. Margo 
Schnabel, '52 is also working at Wood- 
ward's. 

Nan Erickson is employed at Julius 
Garfinkle and Co. 

Doris Thompson Terry '43 had her 
third son in March. 

Kate D. Smith has recently become 
home economist for Frigidaire in the 
Washington-Baltimore area. 

Phyliss Fohrman '52 married Wil- 
liam Herndon on March 6th. They are 
living in Arlington. 

Roberta Bafford '53 was married 
December 5 to Donald Partridge in 
Lexington, N. C. 

Around And About Campus 

Plans are under way for the Home 
Ec. Open House Friday, May 7. 

The Home Economics staff of the 
Maryland Extension Service and the 
Home Ec. staff met recently. Dr. T. 
B. Symons, Dr. Harold Cotterman, 
and Dean Adele Stamp were present 
for the meeting which was designed 
to explain the function of the Ex- 
tension Service. Tea was served. 

Miss Jane Crow, Mrs. June Wilbur 
and Dean M. Mount assisted with the 
judging of the Mrs. Washington con- 
test. 

On March 12, Alice Phillips, senior 
in Home Economics Education appeared 
on the Ruth Crane Show in Washing- 
ton (TV). She demonstrated a Master 
Mix Recipe. During the demonstration 
information was discussed concerning 
the scholarships for Home Economics 
training sponsored by the Home Econo- 
mists In Business in Washington. 

Mr. Ed Longley, now on the staff 
of the College of Home Economics and 
a former graduate of the college be- 
came father of a second daughter dur- 
ing February- 
Miss Irene Eno is a new staff mem- 
ber teaching Interior Design and Sur- 
vey of Art History. 

Your reporters hear that the four 
rooms in the wings are functioning 
well and the staff is grateful to have 
them. One is for Crafts, one is a lec- 
ture room, one is for Draping and 
Home Furnishing and the fourth is 
for Nutrition. 

When the building was planned in 
1938-1939 a maximum of 500 enroll- 
ment was allowed for. The enrollment 
for this year has been 485. In addi- 
tion to Home Ec. students many others 
come in to take the courses so they 
are fairly breaking out the walls! 




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27 



College of 



Military Science 




66 Commissioned 
//This country is looking for men," 
| : University of Maryland Pres- 
ident, Thos. Symons, congratulating 66 
newly commissioned 
Second Lieutenants 
in the U. S. Air 
Force Reserve. "It 
is looking for men 
who can fly. I am 
happy that or Mili- 
tary Science Depart- 
ment was able to 
furnish such a splen- 
did group of candi- 
dates to receive 
Dr.Bymont commissions for 

meeting the demand of our time. You 
have demonstrated your ability to ac- 
complish this distinguished result, but 
let me remind you that this is a begin- 
ning date for your accomplishments 
in the Armed Services. It has been 
said that in the Strategic Air Command 
every day is D-Day. We know that you 
commissioned officers will repeat the 
record of the many Maryland gradu- 
ates who have gone before you into the 
Armed Forces. You have worked very 
hard during the last four years to win 
these commissions, but you'll be called 
upon to work much harder in serving 
your country. 

"I believe in the philosphy that life 
is made up of work, play, love and 
worship," Dr. Symons went on to say, 
"Make your work play; play hard for 
recreation; look forward to loving a 
good wife; and remember that your 
status in life will be measured by your 
faith in our Creator, the God who gov- 
erns all things." 

The newly commissioned Lieutenants 
are: — 

John R. Alderton. James T. Basdnskt. Rym- 
cha M. Bakpr. Robprt O. Bond, William' B. 
Branch. Jr., Nicholas W. Bringas, and A. 
Davis Burk. 

Robprt E. Carrlpran. David C. Chickerine, 
Robert A. ClPmpns. W. Chase Coalp. Jr., John 
J. Collins. Waynp I,. Combs. Bavin T. Con- 
nelly, Jumps H. Oonnpr. Alan M. Crystal, and 
T.nnrpnrp E. Cnrmn. 

Bonis A. Dpcatur. .Tamps O. Dplpvett, 
Georee W. Kntrlnnd. Jr., Bonald F. Erlbeck. 
.Tamps M. Femlano. Carl B. Frpderlck, and 
Marvin C. Fuchs. 

Donald M. Goldman. John H. Guender. 
Elmer B. Horsey, Carroll D. Housp. James A. 
Tcrmnn. Jr., Jay B. JoReph. Morley A. Jull, 
Jr.. and Victor H. Jnnek. Jr. 

.Tosenh G. Katona. Edward C. Kuhl. Jr.. 
Wade R. BppcIi. Willinm XI. Marlev. James V. 
Millpr Thomas D. Millpr. Earl P. Mink, Rob- 
ert J. Moffatt, Donald E. Moran, and Donald 
B Myers. 

Richard C. Nichols. William K. Price, 
RvnncPlo J. Priovolos, Charles E. Push, Rich- 
ard A. Rempta. Theodore f?. Repplier, Jr., 
Robert O. Rlcci, James S. Robinson, and 
Kevin T. Ryan. 

Henry J. Eyland, David F. Schafer, John 
T. Beibert, John R. Shanahan, Maurice Sha- 
piro, George A. Snter. Jr., William M. Tan- 
1 11 in, arid Charles C. TrpxlPr, Jr. 

Frederick D. Vogel, Thomas A. Ward, 
Ralph P. Wpincarrtcn, Donald C. Whpeler, 
Wallace J. Whltp, Donald R. Williams, and 
lid A. Yacer. 

Air Force Conference 
Colonel Joseph R. Ambrose, Dean, at- 
tended the National Professors of Air 
Science and Tactics conference at Max- 
well Air Force base in Montgomery, 
Alabama, the purpose of which was 



28 



to give the officers the latest informa- 
tion about Air Force operations. 
Military Day 
May 13th, the University will observe 
its traditional annual Military Day. 

The day's ceremonies begin at 9:30 
a.m. with presentation of award to 
distinguished cadets. 

The public is 
invited to inspect 
displays of modern 
m i 1 i t a r y on the 
armory floor. 

A B-50, F-86 and 
"Lu c k y Lady" 
were among the 
aircraft to be 
exhibited, togeth- 
er with jet air- 
craft engines and 
a n anti-aircraft 
battery. 




Col. Ambrose 



In the afternoon, the Boiling Air 
Force Base ceremonial drill team 
will demonstrate a precision drill ac- 
companied by the Boiling Drum and 
Bugle Corps. 

The day's climax, the final dress 
parade of the country's largest Air 
Force ROTC, takes place at 2:45 p.m. 

"This date," commented Colonel 
Joseph R. Anibrose, Dean of the Col- 
lege of Military Science, "is the cul- 
mination of the year's training for the 
2700 students who comprise the corps. 
We will be proud and happy to see 
parents, friends, and students on hand, 
together with the State and Federal 
dignitaries, who will honor us with 
their presence at this annual function 
of the AFROTC. 




"Look at it this way, Professor Herunter- 
gefallen; you're in pretty good shape for a 
man of 65. Just forget that you're only 40." 



College of 



Agriculture 



;^===; Dr. Howard L. Stier 

Honorary membership in the col- 
legiate chapter of America was 
conferred upon Dr. Thomas B. Symons, 
president of the University, at the 
annual FFA banquet. 

Honorary degrees were also con- 
ferred upon Dr. Francis C. Stark, Jr., 
of the Horticulture department and 
Donald Watkins, veteran agriculture 
teacher from Gaithersburg. 




Dean Cairns 



Another highlight of the banquet was 
the presentation of the FFA chapter 
sweetheart award to Mary Lou Vernon, 
a senior in Home Economics. 

The FFA scholarship award was pre- 
sented to Robert Stansfield a senior in 
agricultural education and the FFA 
service award was presented to Neri 
Clark, also an agricultural education 
senior. 

Guernsey Breeders Meet 
The Maryland Cooperative Guernsey 
Breeder's Association held its annual 
meeting in Balti- 
more. 

Speakers were W. 
A. Wentworth of 
The Borden Com- 
pany, New York, 
Dr. Arthur Brueck- 
ner, head of the 
Maryland Livestock 
Sanitary Service; 
Dr. Gordon M. 
Cairns, dean of 
agriculture at the 
University, and Dr. 
Glen H. Beck, head 
of the University's dairy department. 
Chemicals Conference 
The groundwork for this summer's 
battle against crop insects and diseases 
in Maryland was laid at the Agri- 
cultural Chemicals Conference in 
Baltimore in March. 

The Conference was sponsored by 
the University's Extension Service and 
Experiment Station. 

Dr. L. O. Weaver, plant pathologist 
at the University, stated that the pur- 
pose of the conference was to provide 
county Extension agents, commercial 
fieldmen and dealers with information 
that enabled them to help Maryland 
farmers with disease, insect and weed 
control problems. 

Orchard Spray 
Many of Maryland's apple and peach 
producers make a big saving on spray 
materials by obtaining and studying 
a new University publication, Bulletin 
134, The Maryland Spray Calendar for 
Apples and Peaches, designed especially 
for commercial orchardmen and is re- 
vised and brought up to date every 
year. 

Maryland orchardmen had consider- 
able experience with a spray called 
Captan last year and the bulletin 
recommends this material again be- 
cause it did not injure fruit or foliage, 
said Dr. L. 0. Weaver, plant path- 
ologst. 

Brown Swiss Officers 
Officers for the eastern and western 
sections of the Maryland-Delaware 
Brown Swiss Breeders Association 
were elected at recent canton meetings 
held by the groups. 

The eastern canton meeting, held at 
Middletown, Del. elected A. A. Mac 
Lashan, Churchill, Md., president; R. 
C. Newman, Middletown, Del., vice 
president and E. O. Cable, Easton, Md., 
secretary-treasurer. 

The western canton, meeting in 
Frederick, elected David Litton, Boons- 
boro, Md., president; Paul Lenox, Rt. 2, 
Gaithersburg, Md., vice president and 
Robert P. McGarry, Shenandoah Junc- 
tion, W. Va., secretary-treasurer. 

"Maryland" 



Holstein Officers 

The Maryland Holstein Association 
elected new officers and named four 
outstanding breeders to receive pro- 
gressive breeder awards at their annual 
meeting in Baltimore. 

C. K. Holter of Jefferson was elected 
president with Ralph Walker of 
Gaithersburg as vice president, H. C. 
Barker of Frederick, as secretary, and 
M. C. Donnell of Breathedsville, 
treasurer. 

Three directors chosen are Merhle 
Ifert, MiddSetown; Sidney English, 
Vienna and R. N. Wills, McDonogh 
School, McDonogh. 

Four breeders received Progressive 
Breeders Awards, the highest award 
the Holstein Association makes. They 
are Ray H. Smith, Frederick; F. G. 
Remsberg and Son, Middletown; Ira 
Ifert and Sons, Middletown and Mc 
Kendree Walkers and Son, Gaithers- 
burg. 

Sheep Growers Field Day 

Maryland sheep producers found the 
answers to many management problems 
in attending the 4th annual Sheep 
Field Day at the University, in charge 
of Dr. Emory C. Leffel, animal hus- 
bandry. 

The program included a talk on 
handling and marketing wool by Amos 
R. Meyer, marketing specialist, Ural 
G. Bee, Baltimore commission merchant, 
talked about marketing lambs. 

Ivan Lindahl, U. S. Department of 
Agriculture, talked on research in 
sheep nutrtion. Boyd Whittle, Uni- 
versity of Maryland Extension animal 
husbandman gave demonstrations and 
exhibitions on sheep management. 

Poultry Hall Of Fame 

Jull Hall, housing the University 
Poultry department, has been selected 
as the permanent Hall of Fame for the 
American Poultry Historical Society. 

The society made the selection at 
its recent annual meeting in Kansas 
City. 

Jull Hall is named after Dr. Morley 
A. Jull, who has been head of the 
poultry department since 1936. In- 
dustry leaders credit Dr. Jull with 
building the University of Maryland 
poultry department into one of the 
finest in the country, and Jull Hall 
will give the department some of the 
best facilities provided on any college 
campus. The building is expected to be 
ready for occupancy in the near future. 

Dr. Jull and Dr. James M. Gwin, 
director of the Maryland Extension 
Service, are charter and lifetime mem- 
bers of the American Poultry Histori- 
cal Society. 

Leonard J. Meyer, Jr. '50, who joined 
the Campbell Soup Company as a 
management trainee in 1953 was ap- 
pointed Assistant to Superintendent, 
Can Manufacturing, Camden Plant on 
February 1, 1954. 

In Peru 

Luis F. Ganoza, '25, since gradua- 
tion, has been manager of Hda "La- 
Encoloda," a sugar and dairy farm, 
near Trujillo, Peru. He is Peruvian 
Agronomical Engineer. He is married 



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Mr. Potts 



and has three daughters. He has been 

ipal councilor, president of the 

mber of Commerce, a member of 

honor of the Peruvian Red Cross, the 

d other organizations. 

"Buck A Mile" Haines 
Col. Mahlon N. Haines, '96 has made 
llines again. This time it was not 
his feats, as a center fielder, on 
Old Timers Baseball Team, at St. 
Petersburg, Florida. Instead he paid 
tuck u .Mile" for a plane to travel 
from Rapid City, South Dakota to see 
him and pick up a check for $2800.00. 
This was his generous way of con- 
tributing to a fund to build a me- 
morial hospital in Rapid City. 

Nash Award 
S. Frederick Potts, an experiment 
>on fellow at Maryland from 1922- 
24, has been awarded the Nash Motors 
National Conservation Certificate of 
Merit. A resident of New Haven, 
Connecticut, he has two daughters and 
he and his wife are 
raising twin boys 
(now aged 14) who 
lost their own par- 
ents about four 
years ago. He has 
served since 1925 as 
Entomologist with 
the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture 
and has over sixty 
■ basic research pub- 
I lications to his cred- 
it. In addition, Mr. 
Potts has carried 
out extensive research on the develop- 
ment of new insecticide and fungicide 
mixture and ground and aerial equip- 
ment. He holds patents on mist blow- 
ers and received the U.S.D.A. Merit 
Award for developing the concentrated 
spray method of ground and aerial 
spray application. He is a member of 
Gamma Alpha (graduate); Theta Chi 
(under graduate); and the Masons. 
To Halt Bang's Disease 
The Board of Regents, sitting as 
the State Board of Agriculture, em- 
barked Maryland on an emergency 
program designed to eradicate brucel- 
losis (Bang's disease) from dairy 
herds. 

It can be transmitted through milk 
to humans, in which it produces un- 
dulant fever. 

The program is expected to cost 
Maryland dairymen about $300,000 and 
the State more than $100,000. 

The State money would go to owners 
for disposing of their infected cows, 
$50 a head for purebreeds and $25 a 
head for others. 

The State Board of Health is adopt- 
ing a regulation that no milk may be 
shipped unless inspected and kept free 
of brucellosis. 

All dairy herds must be enlisted in 
the eradication program by January 
1, 1955. By November 1, 1955, they 
must have been tested, and by Decem- 
ber 31, 1955, all the infected animals 
must have been destroyed. From then 
on, all herds must continue regular 
tests, with the immediate slaughtering 
of any infected animals. 



30 




COLD VIRUS BUGS 

ihi, is what titan be the first photograph 
of the common cold rims. At least, Dr. Regi- 
nald Lee Reagan, Professor of Veterinary 
i iioiniiii.i.iit Stock Sanitary Service. His 
camera has caught these bugs, magnified 

200, times by "" electron microscope. Dr. 

Reagan gave the photo-story scoop to the 
press and the above picture iras also printed 
i,i NEWSWEEK. He wanted to he sure his 
researchers got credit fur a difficult job. 
Other cold experts observe that science still 
doesn't know for sure why every winter one 
i)i seven persons is snuffling. 



University President Thos. B. Sym- 
ons, described it as a "progressive 
move." 

Ferguson, Speaker 

C. M. Ferguson, National Adminis- 
trator of the Agricultural Extension 
Service was the principal speaker at 
the annual Agricultural Convocation 
Banquet held at the University. This 
was a joint function of Alumni, Faculty 
and Students of the School and each 
group was well represented for the 
occasion. 

Alumni President, Lee W. Adkins, 
served as Toastmaster and James 
Arnold, President of the Student Coun- 
cil was Master of Ceremonies. The 
Invocation was by Rev. C. Philip 
Seltzer of the class of '42. Group sing- 
ing was led by Eben Jenkins and J. 
Homer Remsberg, vice-president of 
the General Alumni Association, intro- 
duced the special guests. Dean Gor- 
don Cairns, welcomed the gathering 
following an informal reception and 
presented members of his staff. 

Dr. T. B. Symons, President of the 
University, and long time Dean of the 
College, reviewed recent developments 
at the University and pledged himself 
to a good housekeeping job while re- 
questing enthusiastic support from all 
groups interested in the future of the 
University. He pointed to the magni- 
tude of the Institution which now 
reaches half way around the world 
with its service. 

Student Awards 

Student awards were presented as 
follows: National Block and Bridle to 
Roy Porter, by Prof. M. H. Kerr; Dan- 
forth Scholarship to George Kemp by 
Prof. A. B. Hamilton; State Grange 
Award to Earl Miller also by Prof. 
Hamilton; Virginia Dare Award to 
Maija H. Vilums, a Latvian refugee, 
with a 3.6 scholastic average, by Dr. 
W. S. Arbuckle; Dr. Edgar P. Walls 
Award to Eugene N. Gogel, by R. C. 
Wiley and the Wall Street Journal 
Award to Harry Harp by Dr. P. R. 
Poffenberger. In addition, ten Sears 
Roebuck Scholarships went to Richard 
Brown, John Georg, Davis Scott, Clyde 
Spencer Streett, Jean Smith, Sam 



Mackert, John Warfield, Levin Fishell, 
Bual Holbrook, Dale Mankameyer, and 
William Hash. 

Students in Agriculture presented 
a number entitled "Sinners and Saints." 
Under the direction of Prof. A. B. 
Hamilton, this humorous skit portrayed 
both student days and later activity of 
such Alumni as Rev. John Baden, 
Charlie Keller, Dr. H. B. McDonnell, 
Betty Amos and Fred Bull, Munro 
Leaf, Dr. Symons, and Abe Gottwals. 

Administrator Ferguson, reviewed 
the birth and development of land 
grant colleges and the homestead act 
which made available public lands in 
family size farms. He referred to the 
objective of Extension work to "Build 
a rural citizen, proud of his occupa- 
tion, constructive in outlook, capable, 
efficient, self-reliant, with a lot of 
home and country in his heart." 

Serious Days 

Excerpts from the Adminstrator's 
talk follow: 

"These are the days of serious 
stock-taking and of serious decision- 
making in American agriculture. Once 
again we are in the twilight zone 
between war and peace. The spiral of 
inflation has slowed down, foreign mar- 
kets have shrunken, the stimulus to 
production born of years of war and 
price supports has not worn off. Capital 
requirements in farming have in- 
creased. The investment in machinery 
necessary to meet labor shortages is 
high. Cash costs have increased and 
the margin between cash expense and 
cash returns has narrowed. Beyond 
the farm, costs of marketing have 
reached unprecedented levels. Adjust- 
ments to these conditions are not easy. 
But against this rather difficult picture 
of the present there is a ray of opti- 
mism as our consuming public con- 
tinues to grow at an unprecedented 
rate, creating an ever-increasing mar- 
ket for the products of agriculture. 
And while our economy is a complex 
one born from the world's most un- 
usual combinations of industry and 
agriculture, it is basically strong. And 
we enjoy the world's highest standing 
of living. 

No Gloomy Outlook 

"It is against this backdrop that we 
look ahead. There are those who may 
be described as the prophets of doom. 
There are those who say we have 
gone as far as science will let us go. 
There are those who contend that the 
world has reached a point where it is 
about to destroy itself, either through 
atomic energy or starvation. I share 
neither of these gloomy points of out- 
look. Rather, I feel that we are enter- 
ing into a new era in the field of 
scientific accomplishment. History may 
record it as the atomic age, but no one 
at the moment can accurately predict 
the tremendous impact of tomorrow's 
scientific developments. I hold no fear 
that your children and mine, and your 
grandchildren and mine (if I had any), 
and their children in turn will not be 
as well nourished, as well fed, and 
enjoy a standard of living as great 
or greater than that to which you and 
I have become accustomed^ provided 

"Mq,ryhyfd" 




CONGRATULATIONS! 

Both Maryland alumni, at Richmond, 1 «.. 
Dr. Paul D. Sanders (left) Editor, Southern 
Planter, congratulates Dr. Tho». B. Downing, 
for many years Virginia State Supervisor, Vo- 
eoittonal Agriculture. 

Dr. Downing u>as honored by the American 
Forestry Association and accorded national 
recognition for his outstanding work in ran 
xcrrtition of forest soils and water iii the field 
of Education, Shown congratulating Mr. 
Downing (8 Dr. Paul It. Sanders, Member of 
the American Forestry Association Awards 
Committer. Dr. Sanders Is one of the fore- 
moat leaders of the nation in Agriculture. 



that we do not shut our eyes to the 
frontiers of tomorrow. The frontiers 
of tomorrow in America are not the 
frontiers of new land. They are the 
frontiers of science. Our land-grant 
colleges and their Federal partner, the 
Department of Agriculture, has a 
great responsibility and a wonderful 
opportunity in this day of. new fron- 
tiers. We have the institutions. We 
have a sound philosophy. We must see 
that every possible provision is made 
for these institutions to continue to 
provide the scientific leadership that 
tomorrow's agriculture will demand. 
The challenge that lies ahead for our 
land-grant institutions knows no 
bounds. On them lies the responsibility 
of training tomorrow's agricultural 
leadership. From the doors of this 
campus, whether those doors are in 
College Park or in the most remote 
county in the State, will come the 
trained people, the alumni of these 
institutions. They will be the farmers, 
the research workers, the technicians, 
the teachers, the extension workers of 
tomorrow. In their hands will lie the 
responsibility of welding the efforts 
of research, resident teaching and ex- 
tension education into a solid practical 
system of education which will produce 
the kind of an agriculture that to- 
morrow will demand. They will have 
to recognize that the farmer of to- 
morrow must be a business man. He 
will have to be able to handle invest- 
ments and credit. He will have to be 
a manager, a manager of both labor 
and capital. He will have to be a 
mechanic, a mechanic who is quite 
different from the industrial mechanic 
who probably knows intimately only 
one machine. Tomorrow's farmer must 
know intimately how to handle and 
operate many machines. He will have 
to be a geneticist, a practical kind of 
a geneticist who understands the appli- 

"Maryland" 



cation of genetic principles to animal 
and plant breeding. Tomorrow's far- 
mer will be a chemist,, the practical 

kind of chemist who has a practical 
working knowledge of the chemistry of 

soils, feeds anil fertilizers, hut he will 
also be a botanist, tin- practical kind 
of a botanist who knows plant path- 
ology from tin standpoint <>f plant 

disease control. But more than that he 
will also be an entomologist, and here 
again his entomology must he the 
practical kind, the kind that permits 
him to intelligently apply the science 
of entomology to pest control. He will 
also be an economist and he will have 
to be a student of the economic im- 
pacts which influence agriculture. He 
will have to be a conservationist, one 
who knows and appreciates the import- 
ance and significance of conserving our 
natural resources. 

Task Ahead 

This is the task that lies ahead for 
the land-grant colleges. We have before 
us the greatest challenge of all time to 
see that our research is directed to 
the problems of tomorrow, because 
research on the problems of today is 
often too late. We must carefully 
evaluate at each step the kind of a 
formal educational program that we 
are providing for the agricultural 
leaders of tomorrow." 

Proud Family 

Dr Paul Nystrom, Faculty director 
of instruction for the college and 
Professor and Head of Agricultural 
Economic Dept. in the college, boast 
of an outstanding family. His wife, 
Hilda, is president of the Home Eco- 
nomics Alumni Group and is well 
known in campus and civic activities. 
Paul, Jr., recently received a two 
column write up in a Washington news- 
paper which began "Everything Paul 
Nystrom, Jr. does,, he does well." The 
story goes on to point to his role as 
a football star, a basketball and base- 
ball player, his re- 
cord as a straight 
A student and the 
fact that he is 
president of the Na- 
t i o n a 1 Honorary 
Society, a group to 
which you do not 
belong unless you 
are in the upper 
10% of your class. 
He has been presi- 
dent of his class for 
the past 3 years, he 
is an Eagle Scout 
and received the Sil- 
ver Award, which is 
the highest given by the Senior Scout 
organization of Explorers. In football 
he played tackle and kicked the extra 
points. He kicked 11 of 14 and 2 field 
goals during this season. The previous 
year he made good on 23 of 27 extra 
point attempts and one field goal. 

Daughter Nancy, is a junior and a 
member of the National Honorary So- 
ciety. She was the only sophomore 
majorette and this past year as a 




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31 




i&^m±4iEm 



MARYLANDER'S AT THE NATIONAL FLOWER SHOW 



Dr Conrad R. Link, Professor of Horticulture, shows three 
coeds hyacinths which were a part of the University's exhibit at 
the National Flower Show, in the National Guard Armory, Wash- 
ington, D. 0. Ellen .Johnson, a junior in Home Economics ; Or 
Link ■ Nauru Joy. soyhomore in Home Economics ; and Beth 
ilouser, a senior in Arts and Sciences. The girls are members of 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. 



Professor George J. Abrams, of the University's Agriculture 
Laboratory, shows coed Lorraine A. Jorgenson a Jar and comb 
of honey which was part of the University's honey exhibit at the 
National Flower Show. In the background is what is believed to 
be the only "honey map" ever made of an area and displays vari- 
ous types of honey produced throughout the state of Maryland. 
Miss .lorgenson is a member of Kappa Alpha Theta. 



junior, was head of the drum major- 
ettes at Northwestern Highschool. She 
has been vice-president of her class for 
the past 2 years, is a member of the 
Student Council, Girl Scouts, is active 
in Church and Sunday School work and 
js a summer camp Councilor. She also 
gives gymnastic lessons to three groups 
of grade school girls. 

Mary Jane is in the fourth grade but 
from a scholastic and leadership stand- 
point, is already proving she is cut 
from the same cloth. 

Beef Field Day 

A program of practical information 
for beef producers was arranged for 
the fourth anual Beef Cattle Field Day 
at the University. 

Extension Animal Husbandman Joe 
M. Vial discussed various breeding and 
management practices. 

Three specialists explained to cat- 
tlemen how their calves can meet re- 
quirements for feeder calf sales. 

Dr. John E. Foster, head of the ani- 
mal husbandry department, showed 
cattlemen how to determine which 
calves in their herds are of the type 
to be consigned to a sale. 

Health requirements for calves con- 
signed to sales were outlined by Dr. 
Clyde Everson of the State Livestock 
Sanitary Service. 

Addresses Chemists 
Dr. Mark Keeney of the Dairy De- 
partment presented a lecture before the 
Association of Agricultural Chemists 
on the detection of milk fat adultera- 
tion. 

At Ohio State 
Dr. W. S. Arbuckle of the Dairy De- 
partment presented a series of lectures 
at the 21st Annual Dairy Technology 
Conference at Ohio State University 
on results of dairy technology research 
at Maryland. 



22 



Soil Conservation 

More Maryland farmers applied soil 
conservation practices on their farms 
last year than in any other year on 
record. 

A report recently released from 
the state Soil Conservation Service 
office shows that conservation practices 
in the state in 1953 increased 31 per 
cent over 1962. The number of farm- 
ers cooperating with their soil con- 
servation districts in 1953 was 13,080, 
an increase of 1,056 over 1952. 

A further comparison between activi- 
ties in the two years reveals that in 
1953 there were increases in 22 out of 
3(5 practices listed in the report. 

State Conservationist Edward M. 
Davis also points out in the report 
that an all-time high for any one year 
was reached in three conservation prac- 
tices — tree planting, farm drainage and 
pond construction. 

Nutrition Conference 

Nutrition specialists from the de- 
partments of animal husbandry, dairy 
husbandry and poultry husbandry ap- 
peared with some of the outstanding 
specialists of the feed manufacturing 
industry on the program for the Uni- 
versity's 1954 Nutrition Conference for 
Feed Manufacturers. 

Speakers were Dr. C. D. Caskey of 
Cooperative Mills, Inc.; Dr. J. L. Krid- 
er, McMiller Feed Mills; Dr. Byron T. 
Shaw, administrator of agricultural re- 
search, U. S. Department of Agricul- 
ture; Dr. L. M. Dansky, D. A. Stickell 
and Sons, Inc., Hagerstown, Md.; Dr. 
H. L. Wilcke of Ralston Purina Co., 
and Dr. E. I. Robertson of John W. 
Eshelman and Sons. 

Others from the University of Mary- 
land who spoke were W. L. Ensor, R. 
E. Brown, and Dr. J. C. Shaw of the 
dairy husbandry department; Dr. G. F. 



Combs, W. E. Donaldson, Dr. G. L. 
Romoser, Dr. C. S. Shaffner, G. B. 
Sweet and P. F. Twining of the poultry 
department; Dr. E. C. Leffel of the 
animal husbandry department and R. 
N. Doetsch of the bacteriology depart- 
ment. 

A poultry question roundtable and a 
tour of Jull Hall, the Maryland poul- 
try building, concluded the conference. 

Grounded Chickens 

Dr. Clyne S. Shaffner, Professor of 
Poultry Physiology has developed the 
flightless chicken. He has about 2,000 
of them now. 

His object was to breed a strain of 
chickens that lacked the 22 primary 
and secondary flight feathers. He was 
convinced the feathers were good for 
nothing but flying and caused work 
and expensive machinery to pluck the 
flight feathers in dressing for mar- 
ket. 

Dr. Shaffner was ready to despatch 
a rooster in a laboratory project when 
a student assistant screamed: "That 
chicken doesn't have any wing feath- 
ers." 

Dr. Shaffner mated the rooster with 
four hens. Fifty eggs hatched from 
the hens and one chick did not have 
wing feathers. 

All the first 50 chicks were mated 
among themselves, their offspring 
back-crossed with normal New Hamp- 
shires and of each 10 new chicks 
arrived without wing feathers. 

The process continued from 1949 to 
1953, with the non-flyers building up 
to 60 per cent of the hatch. 

According to Dr. Shaffner it is only 
a matter of time until he produces 
a pure strain of white, non-flying meat 
chickens. 

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In making the decision to set up 
a hall of fame in Jull Hall, the society 
also agreed to set up a committee of 
five to formulate rules for admission to 
the shrine. The committee has not 
yet been named. 

Dr. Beck, Speaker 
Howard C. Clark, Glenleg, Md. was 
re-elected as president of the Mary- 
land-Delaware Ayrshire Breeders Asso- 
ciation at the association's reaerit 
annual meeting held in Ellicott City, 
Md. 

George Simpson, Houston, Del. was 
elected vice president and Mrs. Roger 
Denney, Rt. 1, Frederick, Md., was 
elected secretary-treasurer. 

The three directors chosen to serve 
the association are all from Maryland. 
They are John Shank, Hagerstown; 
Allen Hill, Woodbine and Philip Knatz, 
Owings Mills. 

Dr. Glen H. Beck, head of the Uni- 
versity's dairy department, spoke to 
the group. 

Editors Meet 

The Northeast Region of the Ameri- 
can Association of Agricultural College 
Editors and radio and television farm 
directors held a joint meeting at the 
Lord Baltimore Hotel. Dr. T. B. Sy- 
mons, University President, Stanley 
Andrews, Executive Director of the 
National Project in Agricultural Com- 
munications, and Dr. James M. Quinn, 
Director of Extension Service, were the 
principal speakers. 

The sessions, over a three-day period, 
were devoted to television, visual aids, 
newspapers and magazines. 

Mists Shelby Retires 

Miss Helen Shelby, clothing special- 
ist, retired from Extension Service on 
March 31. 

Miss Shelby came to Maryland in 
1927 as clothing specialist from Okla- 
homa where she had held a similar 
position for three years. 

When Miss Shelby assumed the du- 
ties of clothing specialist for the Mary- 
land Extension Service, a definite cloth- 
ing project had not been a part of 
the regular Extension program in 
every county. Now every county and 
Baltimore City has a definite clothing 
program. The number families adopt- 
ing improved practices has increased 
from 3,360 in 1927 to 34,711 in 1953. 

Through her leadership Miss Shel- 
by's wise planning, creative thinking, 
high standards and sound education- 
al principles have helped thousands of 
Maryland families solve their clothing 
problems wisely and economically. 

Miss Shelby received her bachelor of 
science degree in home economics from 
Peabody College, Nashville, Tennessee 
in 1917. Later she studied two years 
at the University of Tennessee, Knox- 
ville, and two summers at the Uni- 
versity of Chicago. She received her 
master's degree from Peabody in 1924. 

Miss Shelby did 4-H Club work in 
Eunice, Louisiana in 1914 and taught 
home economics in Eunice and Shreve- 
port from 1918-20. 1920-22 she taught 




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Dr. Joseph O. Shaw, Professor of Dairy Husbandry, with coio recently cured of Ketosis. 



textiles and clothing at Wesleyan Col- 
lege, Macon, Georgia. In 1921 she 
taught home management and foods at 
Peabody College. 1922 to 1925 she 
was supervisor of home economics at 
Little Rock, Arkansas. 

Following her retirement Miss Shel- 
by left for Italy and will tour Europe 
for three months. She will make her 
home in Nashville, Tennessee, her na- 
tive state. 

Busy Schedule 

Dr. J. C. Shaw of the Dairy Depart- 
ment was recently a member of a panel 
of four at the University of Pennsyl- 
vania in the discussion of ACTH and 
cortisone in veterinary medicine. Later 
he appeared on the farm and home 
week program of the University of Del- 
aware to present a discussion on pe- 
tosia in dairy cattle. 

At the Bureau of Dairy Industry, at 
Beltsville, Dr. Shaw presented a semi- 
nar on the various approaches to the 
study of metabolism in rumen. 

Before a congressional group, he 
presented a discussion of the role of 
radio-active tracer substances in milk 
secretion studies, a program arranged 
by the AEC. 

Dr. Shaw presented a lecture on the 
measurements of the energy value of 
dairy rations at the Northeastern Col- 
lege Feed Conference Board at Spring- 
field, Mass. Dr. Shaw also appeared on 
the Farm and Home Week Program of 
the University of Delaware, presenting 
being done by her son, of whom she 
a discussion of ketosis in dairy cattle. 



Glenn L. Martin ' 

College of 

Engineering & 
Aeronautical Sciences 

Col. O. H. Saunders '10 
A. Lawrence Guess '61 



U 



Foreign Assignment 

William F. Beiderman, (Engr. '51), 
now with the York Air Condition- 
ing and Refrigeration Co., has been ap- 
pointed Regional Supervisor for that 
company for both Europe and Africa. 
After graduating from the University 
he went into training with the York 
Company following which he was trans- 
ferred to their New York office. Later 
he was sent to South Africa and con- 
tracted for air conditioning in the Exec- 
utive Mansion and other government 
buildings of that nation. More recent- 
ly he has handled some very large 
contracts at air bases in Europe. All 
of these put him in line for the rapid 
promotion he has achieved. 

His mother, Mrs. W. S. Beiderman 
resides at 6604 Elsrode Avenue, Balti- 
more 14, Md. She recently wrote Dean 
Steinberg to thank him for the part 
that he and the other Engineering in- 
structors at the University had in lay- 
ing the foundation for the work now 
has every right to be proud. We are 
sure that the Engineering Alumni take 
great delight in the rapid advancement 
of one of their members. 

"Man/Ian^' 



Heads Combat Battalion 

The 140th Engineer Combat Bat- 
talion, a new organization of the Dis- 
trict of Columbia National Guard is 
commanded by Major Robert M. Con- 
lyn '49, who started his career with 
the D. C. Guard in 1936 when he en- 
listed in the 121st Engineers. Major 
Conlyn is employed by the Naval Re- 
search Laboratory. 

"A most interesting outfit," is the 
way Major Conlyn described his bat- 
talion. Besides the usual infantry 
weapons, radios and telephones, Major 
Conlyn said there is considerable 
heavy machinery such as bridge equip- 
ment, bulldozers and earth moving 
equipment, assigned to the unit. A 
helicopter is included in the variety of 
equipment; and a pilot and mechanics 
are needed, Major Conlyn said. 

Directs Public Relations 
The appointment of Joseph A. Bog- 
an '34, as Director of Public Relations 
of the Cleveland Rock Drill Division of 
LeRoi Company is announced. 

Mr. Bogan came to the Cleveland 
Division, LeRoi Company from Bitumi- 
nous Coal Research, Inc., where he was 
Assistant to the Vice-President and 
Director of Research. 

A graduate of two universities, Mr. 
Bogan holds a Bachelor of Science de- 
gree in Civil Engineering from Mary- 
land and an LL.B. degree from the law 
school of Georgetown. He has also 
studied patent law and is a member of 
the Bar of the Supreme Court of the 
United States. He resides near Eliza- 
beth, Pennsylvania. 

With Westinghouse 

C. Swan Weber '27, was recently 
elected a Vice-President of the West- 
inghouse Electric Corporation and 
transferred from Eastern District Man- 
ager of New York to Washington in 
charge of operations here. Home for 
the family which includes three chil- 
dren, is Burnt Mills Hills, Silver 
Spring. 

Supersonic Flow Conference 

A conference on supersonic flow was 
held at the University. Approximately 
350 engineers and scientists were in 
attendance at this conference spon- 
sored by Maryland's Institute of Fluid 
Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 
with the cooperation of the Institute 
of the Aeronautical Sciences. Profes- 
sor A. W. Sherwood of the Aeronauti- 
cal Engineering Department was chair- 
man of the first session, with G. B. 
Schubauer of the National Bureau of 
Standards, Max M. Munk of the Catho- 
lic University of America, and W. C. 
Fortune of David Taylor Model Basin 
being chairmen of succeeding sessions. 
A total of twenty-six papers were pre- 
sented with the following papers be- 
ing presented by Maryland faculty 
members. 

"Two Dimensional Jet Mixing of 
Supersonic Flow," S. I. Pai and B. B. 
Cary. 

"Some Features of Supersonic Shear 
Flow," C. C. Chang. 

"Supersonic Flutter of Two Dimen- 
sional Panels," S, F. Shen. 

"An Instrument tQ Study Relaxft- 

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tion Rates Behind Shock Waves," E. L. 
Resler and M. Scheibe. 

"A Transonic Approximation," J. B. 
Diaz and G. S. S. Ludford. 

Aeronautical Engineering 

The senior class in aeronautical 
engineering has recently made tours of 
the principal aircraft manufacturing 
companies in the vicinity of the Uni- 
versity — Glenn L. Martin Co., Fair- 
child, and Piasecki Helicopter. 
Electrical Engineering 

The 35 members of the senior Elec- 
trical Engineering class were the 
guests of the Gas and Electric Com- 
pany in Baltimore on December 11. The 
details of the trip were arranged by 
F. H. Rogers, superintendent of the 
company's meter and installation de- 
partment. Mr. Rogers graduated from 
the Maryland Electrical Engineering 
Department in 1925. 

Mechanical Engineering 

The Mechanical Engineering senior 
class acompanied the Aeronautical 
Engineering seniors on their trip to 
Fairchild Aircraft in March. Other 
trips planned for the Mechanical Engi- 
neering seniors are a trip to the Riv- 
erside Plant of Consolidated Gas and 
Electric Company and a trip to the 
Annapolis Experiment Station. 

Institute Of Fluid Dynamics And 

Applied Mathematics 

Study of a new phase of fluid dynam- 
ics has been instigated at Maryland by 
Dr. Theodore Theodorsen, scientific* 
consultant for the Air Force. 

Transitional flow of fluids in pipes, 
basis of the study, will be explored un- 
der the direction of Dr. John R. Wes- 
ke, visiting research professor. 

Dr. Weske has done previous work in 
this field at Johns Hopkins University. 

Attempts will be made to locate the 
origin of turbulence in pipes. Dr. 
Theordorsen has also developed a 
theory on the origin of tornados which 
has been accepted by meteorologists. 

Experimental equipment for the 
project is being constructed in the 
Civil Engineering Laboratory of the 
Engineering building. 

A.I.E.E. 

The Washington section of the Amer- 
ican Institute of Electrical Engineers 
honored the members of the student 
chapters of the Catholic University of 
America, George Washington Univer- 
sity, Howard University and the Uni- 
versity of Maryland at a section din- 
ner. A special honor was conferred 
upon the representatives of each of 
the chapters for their active participa- 
tion in the promotion of the student 
branch activities during the year 1953- 
54. For the University of Maryland 
chapter, Thomas R. Evans was the re- 
cipient of this honor. 

Dr. Astin of the Bureau of Stand- 
ards was the speaker at the dinner and 
in his talk he covered some trends of 
importance to electrical engineers par- 
ticularly in the fiields of automatic in- 
formation processing and control sys- 
tems. He also discussed general elec- 
tric and electronic instruments and 
their importance to other fields of 
specialization. 



86 



A.S.C.E. 

The Maryland State Chapter of the 
American Society of Civil Engineers- 
held their annual "Students' Night" 
at the Engineers Club in Baltimore. An 
enjoyable cocktail hour was fololwed by 
dinner. After all had their fill, a busi- 
ness meeting was held in which Jerry 
Longanecker, president of the student 
chapter of A.S.C.E. at the University 
of Maryland, was called on to intro- 
duce a fellow student, Hans Schweizer, 
who discussed by means of photo- 
graphic slides, "An Engineer's Life at 
Arctic Air Bases." Mr. Schweizer was 
followed by Ronald Mann, a student 
from Johns Hopkins, who discussed the 
design of retaining walls. The busi- 
ness meeting was then closed and an 
informal snloker with refreshments 
was held. At the affair, about 30 stu- 
dents, instructors, and alumnae of the 
University of Maryland, could be seen 
enjoying themselves. 

At the February meeting of the stu- 
dent chapter of A.S.C.S., Dean Stein- 
berg, forced by his many duties which 
require his time elsewhere, announced 
his resignation as faculty adviser of 
the student chapter. Professor Duane 
R. Keller was introduced as the new 
faculty adviser. 

A.S.M.E. 

The student chapter of the Ameri- 
can Society for Mechanical Engineers 
recently held their annual student 
branch banquet at the Stonehouse Inn. 
Mr. John Armstrong of the Naval 
Ordnance Laboratory spoke on shock 
and vibration testing. 

Henry O. Hubick, senior in mechani- 
cal engineering, won the student paper 
contest for 1954. Henry will present 
his winning paper at the A.S.M.E. 
Washington section meeting and also 
at the regional meeting in Rochester, 
N. Y. 

I.A.S. 

Dr. Herman H. Kurzweg of the Nav- 
al Ordnance Laboratory and Mr. Al- 
bert Berryman of the Boeing Airplane 
Company have been the principal 
speakers at recent meetings of the 
student chapter of the Institute of 
Aeronautical Sciences. Dr. Kurzweg 
spoke on problems faced in supersonic 
flight and wind tunnels, and Mr. Ber- 
ryman spoke on product diversification 
in the aircraft industry. 

Sizeable groups from the student 
chapter also attended the I.A.S. Wash- 
ington section meetings on helicopter 
propulsion and on wind tunnel comput- 
ing methods. 

Tau Beta Pi 

The Tau Beta Pi chapter has tapped 
the eleven students for its spring 
initiation. They are: E. M. Roby — Sr. 
EE, J. R. Thayer— Jr. ME, S. Frank— 
Jr. ME, G. P. Maggos— Jr. AE, W. A. 
Gross— Jr. EE, R. H. Lund— Jr. EE, 
T. F. Hartsing— Jr. ChE, D. Carpenter 
—Jr. CE, D. H. Jackson— Jr. EE, W. V. 
Whaley— Jr. ME, and W. B. Roeca— 
Jr. EE. 

An initiation banquet will take place 
at Stonehouse Inn. The speaker at the 
banquet will be Dr. Bruce L. Melvin, 

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Associate Professor in the Sociology 
Department. He will speak on cultur- 
al development in the engineer. 

A.S.E.E. 
Professor Allen, (iuess, Hayleek, 
Long and Shames have recently been 
elected to membership in the Ameri- 
can Society for Engineering Education. 

Professor (Iuess also tied for second 
place in the A.S.K.K. National Capital 
Area Sections Young Engineering 

Teachers' Paper Contest. 

N.S.I'. K. 
Professor Russell Allen lias been 
elected to his seventh term as treas- 
urer of the National Society for Pro- 
fessional Engineers. This term will 
start the first of July 1954. 

E.I.T. Examination 

The Maryland State Hoard of Regis- 
tration for Professional Engineers and 
Land Surveyors, of which Dean Stein- 
berg is chairman, will hold the an- 
nual Engineer-In-Training examination 
on the campus May 1. Graduating sen- 
iors wishing to take the examination 
are reminded that applications must 
be received from the secretary of the 
board and be returned with the fee of 
$10.00 to receive admission cards. No 
one without cards will be admitted to 
take the examination. 

The examination will cover Drawing, 
Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics, Me- 
chanics, Hydraulics, Strength of Ma- 
terials, and Properties of Materials 
and take eight hours to complete. 
Sample EIT examination questions are 
on file in the engineering library and 
plans are in progress for Tau Beta 
Pi to offer tutoring sessions. 

Sand And Gravel 

On March 2, 3, and 4, 1954, the Uni- 
versity of Maryland and the National 
Sand and Gravel Association spon- 
sored a conference on "Use of Sand 
and Gravel in Bituminous Mixtures." 
Fifty-seven were in attendance. The 
objective of the course was to pro- 
vide sand and gravel producers with 
information pertinent to the use of 
their products in bituminous construc- 
tion. Sessions consisted principally of 
discussions led by engineers who had 
broad experience in the field of bitumi- 
nous mixtures. All presentations were 
kept as informal as practicable with 
ample opportunity for questions. Pro- 
vision was made for an inspection of 
the bituminous laboratory of the Bur- 
eau of Public Roads, where methods of 
designing and testing bituminous mix- 
tures were demonstrated. 

Motor Fleet Supervisors 

The College of Engineering spon- 
sored its 7th annual training course 
for motor fleet supervisors during the 
week April 5-9, 1954. 

This course is offered annually by 
the University of Maryland in coopera- 
tion with many national and state or- 
ganizations interested in conservation 
and safety. It is open to fleet owners 
and operators, safety and personnel 
directors, fleet supervisors, and safety 
engineers. The instructors include na- 



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tionally recognized authorities, Mary- 
land experts in the various phases of 
safety practice, and faculty member 
of the University. 

The purpose of the course is to de- 
velop supervisory personnel capable 
of relieving top management of de- 
tails of planning and administering an 
adequate plan for reducing accidents, 
lowering insurance costs and building 
better public relations within the motor 
vehicle fleet. Class and laboratory in- 
struction are supplemented by field 
I ractice. This is a practical course 
designed to enable the enrollee to re- 
turn to his work with the knowl- 
edge necessary to prepare a suggested 
plan of operation. 

Certificates are awarded those regu- 
larly enrolled who satisfactorily fulfill 
course requirements. 

Honor Graduate 
Pvt. Alan P. Keeny, (Engineering 
'52), graduated with honors from the 
Army Engineer School, Fort Belvoir, 
Va., after completing the refrigeration 
equipment repair course. He is a mem- 
ber of Iota Lambda Sigma. 

Alfven Lectures 

Dr. Hannes Alfven, visiting research 
professor in the Institute for Fluid Dy- 
namics and Applied Mathematics and 
the Physics Department, delivered a 
lecture at Brookhaven National Labora- 
tory in New York, on "The Origin of 
Cosmic Radiation," and the same lec- 
ture at New York University's Depart- 
ment of Physics, as well as at the RCA 
Laboratory in Princeton, New Jersey. 

Dr. Alfven, gave an invited address 
at the University of Chicago on "The- 
ory of Origin of Cosmic Radiation." 

Weinstein At Harvard 

Professor A. Weinstein of the In- 
stitute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied 
Mathematics delivered the George E. 
Roosevelt lecture at Harvard Univer- 
sity, titled "On The Method of Axial 
Symmetry." 

At Princeton 

Dr. Robert Finn of the Institute for 
Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathe- 
matics spoke at the Mathematics Club 
of Princeton and the Institute for Ad- 
vanced Study. His topic was "Elliptic 
Partial Differential Equations." 

Firemen Graduate 

Graduation exercises of the Basic 
Firemen's Training Course sponsored 
by the Fire Service Extension took 
place at Fire Department Headquar- 
ters in Brentwood. The course consisted 
of 20 sessions, representing 60 class- 
hours of instruction. Each graduate 
received a personal pocket card signi- 
fying satisfactory completion and the 
fire department concerned received a 
certificate from the University. 

This was one of 88 classes conducted 
under University of Maryland sponsor- 
ship. 

Firemen Short Course 
The third annual Short Course for 
Firemen, held at the University, was 
conducted by Robert C. Byrus, Direc- 
tor of the University's Fire Service 




Director Byrut 



38 



Extension and sponsored by State Fire 
Marshal Charles S. Jackson, Insur- 
ance Commissioner. 

Speakers included: Dr. T. B. Symons, 
Acting President, University of Mary- 
land; Benjamin R. Benson III, Special 
Investigator, State 
Fire Marshal's Of- 
fice; Mr. Dale K. 
Auck, Chief, Fire 
Protection Section, 
Federation of Mut- 
ual Fire Insurance 
Companies, Chicago, 
111.; Robert C. By- 
rus, Director, Fire 
Service Extension, 
University of Mary- 
land; Prof. Donald 
Krimel, Department 
of Journalism, Uni- 
versity of Maryland; Prof. George Bat- 
ka, Department of Speech and Dra- 
matic Art, University of Maryland; 
Mr. D. Thomas Owens, Senior Instruc- 
tor, Fire Service Extension, Univer- 
sity of Maryland; Edward Pugh, As- 
sistant Manager, Maryland Fire Un- 
derwriters Rating Bureau, Baltimore, 
Md.; J. H. Cromwell, Defense Coordi- 
nator, Chesapeake and Potomac Tele- 
phone Co., Baltimore, Md.; Col. H. A. 
Brewer, Director of Tactical Operations 
Office, Federal Civil Defense Admin- 
istration, Washington, D. C; Paul I. 
Leary, Inspector, Maryland Survey 
Bureau, Baltimore, Md.; L. David Korb, 
Head, Training and Safety Branch, 
David Taylor Model Basin, Washing- 
ton, D. C; Deputy Chief Frank Tren- 
ner, Baltimore City; Fire Marshal 
Charles Howe, Montgomery County; 
Deputy Chief Louis Maisel, Baltimore 
County; Captain Joseph T. Cadden, 
Commanding Officer, 549th Explosive 
Ordnance Disposal Control Detach- 
ment, Baltimore, Md.; Dr. Albert 
Lightbody, Chief of Chemistry Di- 
vision, Naval Ordnance Laboratory, 
White Oaks, Maryland; and John Mey- 
ers, Special Investigator, State Fire 
Marshal's office. 

Subjects covered included: "Legal 
Aspects of Fire Safety," "Conducting 
and Reporting Fire Prevention Cam- 
paigns," "Fundamentals of Fire Be- 
havior," "How to Prepare Press Re- 
leases," "How to Talk on Radio and 
TV," "Standards-Codes-Regulations," 
"Protecting Employees and Buildings 
in Industry," "Urban Analysis," "Sci- 
entific Fire Control," "Safety for Fire 
Inspectors," "Lessons of Experience," 
"Hazards of Explosives," "Character- 
istics of Modern Plastics," "The Ad- 
juster — The Firemen's Friend (?)"; 
and "Experiences from the Fire Mar- 
shall's File." 

In Memphis 

Director Robert C. Byrus of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland's Fire Service Ex- 
tension, accompanied by Senior Instruc- 
tors Curtis C. Larrimore and C. 
Thomas Owens, attended the Fire De- 
partment Instructors Conference in 
Memphis, Tenn. 

Byrus participated in a panel dis- 
cussion "Trends in Training Centers." 

"Maryland" 



Owens lectured on "The Place of Rescue 
Training in the Fire Service." 

There were 1500 fire department 
instructors present from about 40 
states and Canadian provinces. 

Mapmakers Meet 

A Conference on Surveying and Map- 
ping in the State of Maryland by the 
Bureau of Control Surveys and Maps, 
in cooperation with the College of 
Engineering, was attended by surveyors 
and engineers. 

Dean S. S. Steinberg of the College 
of Engineering, is Chairman of this 
State Bureau. 

Speakers and members of discusson 
panels included: George W. Cassell, 
Bureau of Control Surveys and Maps; 
Lansing G. Simmons, U. S. Coast and 
Geodetic Survey; Carroll F. Merriam, 
Pennsylvania Water and Power Com- 
pany; Draper K. Sutcliffe, Maryland 
Department of Public Improvements; 
Richard W. Cooper, Registered Land 
Surveyor; Page F. Hopkins, Maddox 
and Hopkins, Civil Engineers; Thomas 
B. Howard, Jr., J. Spence Howard and 
Company; J. R. McCrone, Jr., Regis- 
tered Engineer and Land Surveyor; Leo 
W. Rader, Registered Land Surveyors; 
Thomas W. Shrives, Anne Arundel 
County Sanitary Commission; and J. 
H. Seibert, County Surveyor (Wash- 
ington County). 

The Maryland Bureau of Control 
Surveys and Maps have devised several 
new field office methods for use on 
horizontal control. These include, con- 
trol without triangulation, transfer of 
coordinates, from one grid to another, 
a new solution to the three point prob- 
lem and the advantages of the use of 
automatic calculators over log tables. 

Alumni Histories 

The Engineering Alumni reported 
upon in this issue cover selections at 
random from the clases of 1911 to 
1952, inclusive, and are confined to 
those engineers whose names begin 
with "T" to "W" inclusive. 

In a "write-up" of this nature it is 
impossible to cover more than a dozen 
or so in each issue. 

We hope some not yet reported 
upon will look forward to future issues 
that are sure to contain brrf histories 
such as those below. 

Engineer, 1911 Retired 

Victor K. Trimble who spent two 
years at Maryland with the Class 
of 1911 is now retired but retains an 
interest in the Fuel Mines of Mt. 
Savage, Maryland, of which he was 
owner and operator. His address is Mt. 
Savage, Maryland. 

He and his wife Virginia A. 
Trimble, have one daughter, Marianna 
Trimble. 

Trimble's Military Service covered 
a period of one year, in World War I, 
during which he was a Corporal. He 
has been interested in American Legion 
and Masonic matters, and is one of our 
most interested supporters of the 
Alumni Magazine, "Maryland."' 

With Veterans Administration 

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1912), of 3901 Saul Road, Rock Creek 
Hills, Kensington, Maryland, is a 
Mechanical Engineer with the Heating 
Section, Technical Service, Veterans 
Administration. 

He has had a varied career as a 
teacher, soldier, salesman and engi- 
neer. 

His military service included duty 
on the Mexican Border and in World 
Wars I and II. 

Warthen is a loyal supporter of the 
University Alumni and the Magazine, 
"Maryland." 

A. V. Williams, (BS OF CE '17), 
who also continued his studies in Engi- 
neering at University of Penna., to 
1922 — is President and Treasurer of 
Williams Construction Co., Inc. He 
resides at 6414 Murray Hill Road 
Baltimore 12, Maryland. 

He has held many positions of trust 
and importance such as: President 
and Treasurer, Middle River Shopping 
Center, Inc.; President and Treasurer, 
The Trailer Village Corporation; Presi- 
dent and Treasurer, Trailer Village 
Sales, Inc.; President and Treasurer, 
Nanticoke Transportation Co., Inc.; and 
Vive-President, McNutt and Williams 
Construction Co., Inc. 

His Military Service from 1917 to 
1920, saw him a Captain of the U. S. 
Marine Corps. 

He is a member of the Baltimore 
Country Club; Engineer's Club of 
Baltimore; American Road Builders 
Association; and the Maryland High- 
way Contractors Association. 

He and his wife, Blanche 0. Wil- 
liams, haye two children — Albert Henry 
aged 5 years and Jennie Lee, aged 6 
years. 

Highways On Pennsylvania 

William Faber Troxwell (CE '25J, 
Franklin, Penna., is a Highway Engi- 
neer with the Pennsylvania Depart- 
ment of Highways. His service with 
that organization has been continuous 
since, graduation. 

He is married to Catherine Douglas 
Barnsly, a 1930 graduate of Maryland. 

Troxwell is a registered professional 
engineer in Pennsylvania and is a mem- 
ber of Masonic Organizations and the 
American Society of Civil Engineers. 
Dependable Ted Vandoren 

Theodore J. Vandoren, Jr. (BS of 
CE '25 and CE '36) whose residence is 
3911 Morrison Street, N. W., Washing- 
ton 15, D. C, is an active Civil Engi- 
neer who has been and still is one 
of tht most staunch and loyal mem- 
bers of the Alumni. 

He has been at the head of the 
Alumni organization and also President 
of the Engineering Alumni in years 
past and is an indefatigable worker 
on all alumni matters. 

He and his wife, former Marie R. 
Duffey, have two children — Margaret 
C. Duffey (Step-daughter), and Angela 
M. Vandoren. 

Vandoren had military service in 
1918-1919. He is the author of "Mod- 
ern Methods of Weatherproofing", 
which was his thesis when he received 
the degree of CE in Engineering in 
1936. 

The Alumni of the University owe 



much to the work and interest of 
"Ted" Vandoren. 

With General Electric 

Edward S. Thompson, (Engr. '26) 
lives at 8500 Concord Hills Circle, 
Cincinnati 27, Ohio, and is the Man- 
ager of Contracts, Aircraft Gas Tur- 
bine Division General Electric Com- 
pany, Evendale, Ohio. 

He has held various positions in 
engineering in the General Electric 
Company from May 10, 1926 to the 
present. He spent the period 1928 to 
1936 as a 2nd Lieutenant of the United 
States Marine Corps Reserve. 

In 1928, Thompson received the de- 
gree of SM of ME from Massachuseets 
Institute of Technology. 

His wife, Elizabeth Smith Thomp- 
son is a graduate of Bryn Mawr, 1925 
and Columbia, 1927. They have two 
teen-aged children — Ann Morton near- 
ly nineteen, and John Robey nearly 
sixteen. 

Thompson is the holder of five pat- 
ents on his inventions. He is an as- 
sociate Fellow of the Institute of Aero- 
nautical Sciences; Member of the 
American Society of Mtchanical Engi- 
neers; Member of the Society of Auto- 
motive Engineers; of the Mohawk Club 
of Scheneebody, and the Rotary Club 
and Chamber of Commerce of Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. 

He is the author of several articles 
published in technical magazines. 
Building Supply Business 

H. Edward Wheeler, (BS of G7 '29) 
of Bel Air, Maryland, is owner and 
Proprietor of a retail Building Supply 
Business. 

He and his wife, Lucille Berry 
Wheeler have two children, Susan Vic- 
toria, four, and Christopher Michael, 
2V2 years of age. 

His military service covers the 
period from February, 1941 to Feb- 
ruary, 1946, during which he became 
a Lieutenant Colonel, Army Air Forces. 
Virginia Road Commission 

James N. Wallace, (BS of CE '30 
and CE '34) lives at 1830 Enslow Ave., 
Huntington, West Virginia, and is Dis- 
trict Engineer with the State Road 
Commission of West Virginia. 

Prior to his present position he was 
employed as a Sales Engineer with 
Kopper Co., Inc. 

He married Cora Lee and they have 
two children, Barbara Lee (now Mrs. 
V. L. Henry, Jr., and Robert Eugene, 
a teen-aged son. 

Wallace is a Theta Chi; Tau Beta 
Pi; BPOE; Member of American So- 
ciety of Civil Engineers and Past 
President of the West Virginia Sec- 
tion of that Society; Member of West 
Virginia Society of Professional Engi- 
neers and Past President of the Hunt- 
ington Chapter of that organization 
and also Past member of the State 
Board of Directors of the same society. 
Wallace is also a registered profes- 
sional engineer in West Virginia and 
Pennsylvania. 

With Greiner Compapany 

G. E. Taylor, Jr. (Engr.; BS of CE 
'36) lives at Severna Park, Maryland, 
PO Box 242, and is a Project Engineer 
with J. E. Greiner Co., of Baltimore, 
Maryland, with whom he has been 



40 



"Maryland" 



since 1940. The head of the Greiner 
Company is Hersehel Allen who is a 
distinguished Maryland graduate in 
Engineering- of the Class of 1910 and 
the Engineer who headed the organi- 
zations that built the Chesapeake 
Bay Bridge. 

Taylor is married and has one son, 
Douglas E., aged (1 years. 

From 1944 to 1946 Taylor served 
in the Headquarters of the 6th Air 
Force and saw duty from the Phillip- 
pines to Japan. 

Taylor is a member of the Severna 
Park Rotary Club and of the American 
Society of Civil Engineers. 

At Billings, Montana 

James Turnball, (CE 1938), now re- 
sides at 1202 Avenue F, Billings, Mon- 
tana; where he is Regional Drainage 
Engineer with the Bureau of Reclama- 
tion for Region 6. Prior to his pres- 
ent position he was Research Project 
Supervisor with the Soil Conserva- 
tion Service. 

His military service covers the period 
of August, 1943, to December, 1945, 
during which time he was a 1st Lieu- 
tenant and Captain. 

He is married to the former Isabel 
Hamilton and they have four children, 
Martha Jean, 12; Robert James, 11; 
Donald Hamilton, 7; and Andrew Gor- 
don, 1 year of age. 

Turnball is Chairman, Committee on 
Drainage of Irrigated Land, American 
Society of Agricultural Engineers. 

Heads Own Business 

L. L. Wilson (ME, 1941) of 427 
Shortridge Drive, Wynnewood, Penn- 
sylvania, is a Manufacturer's Repre- 
sentative for Hardware and Wire Pro- 
ducts. Previously he was with WeSt- 
inghouse Corporation. 

In California 

Charles M. Weber, Jr. (BS of Mech- 
Areo Engr. '50) resides at 1107-A 21st 
Street, Santa Monica, California — and 
is Aero-Engineer with the Rand Corp. 

He is married and he and his wife 
Dorothea have one child, Carole, aged 
two years. 

His military service covered the 
period 1941 to 1947 and he had the 
rank of Lieutenant Colonel, Air Force, 
and saw service in the Pacific Theater 
with the 20th Air Force. He received 
the Air Medal and Distinguished Fly- 
ing Cross. 

He is a member of Tau Beta Pi 
and Phi Kappa Phi. 

In Patent Law 

John Robert Utermohle, (Engr, '52) 
now lives at 6605 47th Place, River- 
dale, Maryland, and is engaged in 
Patent Law work as he has started 
on his upward swing from the position 
of a Patent Law Clerk. 

He is married and he and his wife, 
Hilda E. Utermohle are the proud 
parents of one child, Jackie (Jonne), 
about 1% years of age. 

Utermohle served in the Navy from 
July 30, 1946 to July 29, 1948. 

He is one of the many recent Engi- 
neering graduates who has expressed 
a desire to receive the Alumni Maga- 
zine, "Maryland." 

"Maryland" 



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41 




MARYLAND AWARD IN MUNICH 

In Munich. Germany, Capt. Richard W. Levardson (right), of Ridgewood, N. J., receives the 
University of Mart/land's 1952-53 Scholastic Achievement award from Irving H. Krakusin, 
chief education adviser for the Southern Area Command. The captain, attending the University 
through its overseas program in Munich, was recognized for his straight "A" or 4.0 average. 

Captain Levardson ones through tnuoh more to reach his classrooms than does the average 
college student. Stationed at the Army's Europe Medical Training Center in Oegerndorf, he 
must make the 100 mile trip to school four times a week. So far, he hasn't missed a class. 

At the end of the present semester, the captain, twice named on the dean's Kst, will have 
95 credits toward the 136 necessary for a degree in military science. 



College of 



Special & Continuation 

Studies 



Richard H. Stottler 



// I uvenile Delinquency, A Growing 
J Problem" was the topic for dis- 
cussion at the sixth session of the 
"Institute for Maryland Law Enforce- 
ment Officers." 

Dr. Peter P. Lejins, Professor f 
Sociology and recognized authority In 
the field of criminology, was the prin- 
cipal lecturer. Dr. Lejins discussed the 
general area of juvenile delinquency 
and the new techniques that may be 
employed by law enforcement agencies 
in preventing and controlling juvenile 
delinquency. Also, in his discussion, 
Dr. Lejins defined juvenile delinquency 
and just who is a juvenile delinquent. 

The program was sponsored by the 
Special and Continuation Studies, 
Maryland Police Association, Maryland 
Municipal League, Maryland State 
Police, and Police Departments through- 
out the State of Maryland. 

' 'ooperating departments included 
the University School of Medicine, 
Division of Legal Medicine, the De- 
partment of Psychology, the Universily 
Police Department, and the Department 
of Sociology. 



42 



Iceland Courses 

"Major Foreign Governments" and 
"American Foreign Relations," two 
University courses at Kaflavik, Ice- 
land, Air Defense Force Base, broke 
all attendance records for the Univer- 
sity's off-the-campus classes, according 
to Kaflavik's report to the University. 

More than 150 Army, Navy, Air 
Force and American civilians filled the 
classrooms to overflowing when 83 en- 
rolled for the course in "Major For- 
eign Governments" and 60 filed into 
the "American Foreign Relations" 
class. 

These courses hold record over such 
off-campus centers at the Pentagon, 
where the University student body 
numbers 900. No two classes, how- 
ever, have shown an enrollment to 
match Keflavik Airport's 150 students. 

Students at the Keflavik Military Air 
Transport Service-operated base are 
finishing their courses in eight weeks 
instead of the usual sixteen, since their 
classes are held six hours per week. 

Conducting both courses is Dr. A. 
P. Campanella, who has served as lec- 
turer at several universities and col- 
leges including assignments at the Uni- 
versity of Barcelona (Spain) and the 
University of Florence (Italy). He 
also served the State Department as 
Director of the U.S. Information Serv- 
ice at Darmstadt, Germany and in 
Afghanistan as Representative of the 
Division of Cultural Relations. 

Dr. Campanella, at Thule Air Base, 
Greenland, also conducted classes in 
Economics and Political Science. 



Schultheia, Speaker 

Lieutenant H. F. Schultheis, Mary- 
land State Police, spoke on the "Pres- 
ervation of Physical Evidence" at the 
seventh session of the Institution for 
Maryland Law Enforcement Officers. 

He discussed methods and procedures 
used in collection, preservation and in- 
terpretation of physical evidence found 
in connection with a crime. 

Sponsors of the Institute for Mary- 
land Law Enforcement Officers include 
Maryland's College of Special and Con- 
tinuation Studies, the Maryland Police 
Association, the Maryland State Police 
Department, and the Maryland Munici- 
pal League. 

Chief Daniel Wiseman of the Uni- 
versity Police Department stated, 
"Through the cooperation of these 
sponsors Maryland offered a volun- 
tary training program that attracted 
more than 200 police and law en- 
forcement personnel from all areas 
of the State." 

Law Enforcement Panel 

A panel of university psychologists 
presented a program at the University 
on the subject "Making Better Law 
Enforcement Officers", at the eighth 
session of the Institute for Maryland 
Law Enforcement Officers. 

The panel of Psychologists was com- 
posed of Dr. Thomas Andrews, Pro- 
fessor and Head of Psychology, Dr. 
Ray C. Hackman, Dr. Arthur W. 
Ayers, and Dr. Sherman Ross, of the 
Psychology Department. They dis- 
cussed how to evaluate the law en- 
forcement officer, his attitudes, his 
aptitudes, and his performance on the 
job. Attention was given by various 
members of the panel to methods of 
selection, indoctrination, and training 
of law enforcement personnel. 

Praise From London 

Miss Adele H. Stamp, Dean of Wom- 
en, recently received a letter from Mrs. 
Phyllis Biscoe, Hospital Chairman of 
the English Speaking Union of the 
Commonwealth, London, England, in 
which Mrs. Biscoe expresses apprecia- 
tion of the University's faculty mem- 
bers who are on duty in England in 
connection with the overseas program. 

While there has been much favor- 
able reaction among the students tak- 
ing advantage of this program, it has 
never before been noted that the fac- 
ulty members are making a worthwhile 
contribution towards international un- 
derstanding. "In the wider view of 
Anglo-American relations," Mrs. Bis- 
coe wrote, "we realize that the Mary- 
land program is of primary importance, 
but we now see another side, the im- 
pact of the program on the British 
community." 

"The program has done a tremendous 
amount of good among the people 
themselves," Mrs. Biscoe went on to 
say, "but I cannot tell you what a 
great help it has been to us to have 
a group like the University of Mary- 
land teachers and students, whose cul- 
tural backgrounds and interests pro- 
vide one of the best means of con- 
tact with the people of the same back- 
ground in this country." 

"Maryland' 



\ , JL 



Graduate School 



Drops "Baron" 

Baron Wilfred Ernest Adolph von 
Mayer, 25-year-old student dropped 
his high-sounding title when he took 
his oath as a citizen of the United 
States. 

von Mayer is working for a master's 
degree in modern German history. The 
family acquired the aristocratic title 
when von Mayor's granfather received 
his title from Prince Ernest of Saxe- 
Cobourg Gotha in the lXHO's. 

Born in Frankfurt, Germany, von 
Mayer left with his family in 1936, at 
the time of the Nazi outbreak. Living 
first in Villars, Switzerland, and later 
in Paris and London, von Mayer came 
to the states in 1948. 

"The title," von Mayer said, "didn't 
mean much more than Kentucky colo- 
nel. Sort of like a British knight." 

von Mayer added that his studies 
probably will be interrupted next June 
when he enters the armed services of 
his adopted country. 



Busy Days 



Short courses and conferences sched- 
uled for 1954 include the following: 

February 9 — Police School ; February 
20-21 — Convention Church of Latter 
Day Saints. 

March 2-4 — Conference on Sand and 
Gravel; March 9 — Police School; March 
117 — Conference on Maryland Plane 
Coordinate System; March 19-20 — 
Conference on Supersonic Flow; March 
20 — Pre Legislative Conference of 
YMCA; March 25-26— Poultry Nutri- 
tion Conference. 

April 5-9 — Motor Fleet Supv. Con- 
ference; April 13 — Police School. 

May 1 — Mathematics Association of 
America; May 11 — Police School; May 
14 — Civil Defense Group; May 15 — 
Guidance Conference; May 30 — Bac- 
calaureate. 

June 5 — Commencement; June 8 — 
Police School; June 14-19 — Rural 
Women's Short Course; June 21-30 — 
Association of Editors; June 22-23 — 
F.F.A.; June 28-July 1 — Assessors 
School; July 6-30 — Institute of Cos- 



metology; July 11-14— P. T. A.; July 
23-30 — American Legion Hoys Nation. 

August 2-7 — Boys and Girij Club 
Week; August 30 to September 2 — 
Marketing Conference; September 7-10 
— Firemen's Short Course. 

Vocotionalists Meet 

Dr. H. F. Cotterman, Dean of the 
Faculty, welcomed the 36th Annual 
Spring Conference 

of the Maryland Vo- 
cational Association, 
a group which Dr. 
Cotterman helped 
form and of which 
he was President in 
1928. 

Dr. Cotterman con- 
gratulated the as- 
sociation for, "Keep- 
ing alive the funda- 
mental concepts and 
needs for vocational 
education and helping to articulate the 
various phases of this type of instruc- 
tion." 




Diidi Cotterman 



College of 



Physical Education 
Recreation & Health 



Personnel Aide 

Mrs. Ellen Harvey, Professor of 
Recreation at the University, is a 
member of the National Recreation 
Associations Advisory Committee on 
recruiting, training 
^^a» » an d placement of 
""" recreation field has 

prepared a guidance 
leaflet for Nation- 
wide distribution en- 
titled "How to 
Choose the Right 
College for Your 
Career in Recrea- 
tion." Twenty thou- 
sand copies will be 

distributed to school 
Harvey , , . , 

teachers, guidance 

councilors, public recreation depart- 
ments and profesional workers. There 
are now over twenty thousand pro- 




fession workers niring full time fler- 

\ne in public recreation departmi 
youth-serving agencies, hospitals, in- 
stitutions, and other OrganizatiOl 

In Washington * oaatj 
Faculty members wen peclal con 
sultants for the Mid Year Workshop 

conducted by the Board of Education 
of Washington Counts. Dr. Benjamin 
Masse>. Dr. Dorothy .Mohr, Dr. Warren 

Johnson and Dr. .lame- Humphrey 

were advisors in Physical Education. 
1st Lieut. USAF 

Marvin L. Kramer '60, of Atlantic 
City, N. J., was recently promoted to 
the grade Of First Lieutenant in the 

United States An Force. Kramer is 
presently assigned as Personnel Serv- 
ices Officer at Headquarters Fourth 

Air Force, Hamilton Air Force Base, 
California. 

He was called to active military serv- 
ice in August, 1952 and served as 
Troop Movement Officer at Camp 
Stoneman, Calif., prior to his assign- 
ment at Hamilton in July, 1953. He is 
well remembered as a football great 
at Maryland. 

At Cortland, N. Y. 

Instructor Haverstick served as con- 
sultant in Body Mechanics and Adap- 
tive Physical Education at the con- 
ference held in conjunction with the 
dedication of the New Physical Educa- 
tion Building of the State Teacher's 
College, Cortland, New York. 

At Frederick 

Dr. Ellen Harvey, Physical Educa- 
tion, served as Co-Chairman for the 
Third Annual Governor's Conference 
on Recreation, held in Frederick re- 
cently. The theme of the conference 
was "Resources for Recreation in 
Maryland". 

At Harrisonburg 

Dr. Dorothy R. Mohr, Physical Edu- 
cation, was guest speaker at the Col- 
lege Convocation, Madison College, 
Harrisonburg, Virginia recently. Her 
topic was "The Place of Physical Edu- 
cation in the General Education of the 
College Woman". Dr. Mohr also served 
as a consultant on student teaching 
to the Department of Physical Educa- 
tion. 




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HEADS OF ALUMNI GROUPS 
A BALTIMORE QUARTET 

i.i it to right: Ram h. Silber, President «/ the "M" Chtb; Dr. Albeit E. Goldstein, President 
of tin Alumni Council; Joints Stevens, President of the Terrapin Club; Colonel Triplett, 
President of the Alumni Club of Baltimore. 



NEWS FROM 



ALUMNI CLUBS 



Baltimore Club Will Honor Seniors At 
Dance, April 30th 

The Alumni Club of Baltimore will 
entertain at an informal dance and 
get-together when the Baltimore sen- 
iors of the University's professional 
schools and College Park will be hon- 
ored guests. The affair is to be held in 
the officers' quarters of the Medical 
Regiment Armory at Greene and Fay- 
ette Streets on Friday, April 30th, at 
9 p.m. 

Sam Silber, Program Chairman, 
promises a full evening of entertain- 
ment highlighted by dancing and re- 
freshments. Dr. William Triplett, Pres- 
ident of the Baltimore Club, and Robert 
Kent, Membership Chairman, will pre- 
side. 

Assisting with arrangements are 
Gretchen Van Slyke Welsh, Dr. Irvin 
P. Klemkowski, A. J. Ogrina, Jr., Dr. 
Frank Slama, John R. Mitchell, Sally 
Ogden and Beatrice Jarrett. 

This is the fourth of a series of 
entertainments and meetings of the 
1953-54 season planned by the Balti- 
more group. 

The annual meeting and election of 
officers is scheduled for 8 p.m., Mon- 
day, June 7th, at Gunther's Clubroom. 
All members of the Alumni Club are 
urged to attend both functions. 







■■I'm torry, Mr. Veberrock, tint when he 
says in iiiil sec nobody he doesn't mean 
maybe I" 




'AT Club Program 

"M" Club, for 1954 
is headed by Pres- 
ident Sam Silber, 
former Ail-Ameri- 
can lacrosse play- 
er, football letter 
winner, Command- 
er, United States 
Navy, fighter pilot 
during World War II and now a bak- 
ery executive. 

Other officers and the Board of Gov- 
ernors of the "M" Club for '54 are: 

Vice-President Al Heagy 

Secretary Bob James 

Treasurer Jack Paber 

Historian Bill Hottel 

SPORTS REPRESENTATIVES 

Football Elmer Wingate 

Baseball Ford Loker 

Basketball George Knepley 

Lacrosse Bill La rash 

Cross-Country Earl Thomson 

Boxing Bob Hafer 

Track Chester Ward 

Tennis Maurice Schwartzman 

Soccer Eddie Rieder 

Wrestling Sully Krouse 

Golf Bob Buppert 

Ritie AI Woods 

REPRESENTATIVES AT LARGE 

Bucky Miller Baltimore 

( lharlie Elllnger Baltimore 

Joe Deckman College Park 

Stan Levine Baltimore 

Gene Kinney Hyattsvllle 

Lawrence Smallwood Washington 

Julie Radice Washington 

Milton Vandeuberg Baltimore 

President Silber and the Board of 
Governors of the "M" Club plan a very 
ambitious program for the current 
term of office which ends at the now 
famous "M" Ail-American Dinner on 
Friday, February 11, 1955 in the main 
ballroom of the Emerson Hotel, Balti- 
more, Maryland. 

Milton Vandenberg of Baltimore has 
accepted the General Chairmanship for 
this banquet. 

BANQUET COMMITTEE 

Program and Publicity — Charles Elllnger, 
Sam Silber. 

Tickets — John Mitchell, Bucky Miller, Gene 
Kinney. 

Reception— Bcrnie Ulman, Joe Henderson. 

Arrangements -Bill Larash, Harlon Mur- 
I'hy. 

Coordination "»</ Direct Mail — Al Heagy, 
Ford Loker, Joe Deckman. 

Another star packed program of na- 
tional prominence is planned to be 
fast-moving and featuring many light- 
ning surprises objective: — Attain the 
reputation as the best all-round sports 
banquet in the East. 

During June Week, exact time will 



44 



"Maryland" 



be announced later, the Washington, 
D. C. group headed by Dr. Julie Radice 
and Dr. Lawrence Smallwood are plan- 
ning a banquet in Washington, D. C. 
to honor and officially welcome all 
the graduating senior "M" winners 
to the "M" Club. 

Moving along, after the football sea- 
son and just prior to the Christinas 
holidays, there will be another annual 
game between Varsity basketball and 
Alumni, with additional attractions 
featuring boxing, wrestling and tum- 
bling exhibitions, also an indoor track 
event. George Knepley's alumni team 
will have the help of All-America Gene 
Shue, as Gene graduates in June. The 
Varsity-Alumni basketball game should 
be quite a contest. 

The entire "M" group wishes to ex- 
press its appreciation to all the Alum- 
ni, Terrapin Club members, various 
University groups and individuals for 
their loyal support in not only the 
"M" Club affairs but the many func- 
tions and sports events held by the 
University of Maryland. 



Gymkana 



Maryland's "Ambassadors of Good 
Will," the Gymkana troupe, presented 
the troupe's eighth annual Home Show 
in the Coliseum. 

The theme of the show was "Gym- 
kana on Broadway," it featured 15 
acts, each a production number. The 
show was sensational and extremely 
"professional." 

The stage was set with bubbles, 
special scenery, and trick effects. 

During intermission members of the 
troupe presented demonstrations of 
competitive gymnastics. 

The show had a cast of 30, all mem- 
bers of the traveling troupe, one half 
of them girls. 

The troupe appeared on the telethon 
sponsored by the Washington Society 
for Crippled Children, the TV mara- 
thon, held to raise funds for the war 
against cerebral palsy, the dread child 
crippler. 

The gymnasts played also at various 
high schools in Maryland and Virginia 
as well as in twelve different states 
and at various overseas service bases. 

Recognized for the professional 
polish of its various numbers, the 
troupe is one of the most popular vol- 
untary extra-curricular campus activi- 
ties, only a few of the members of 
which are physical education students. 

An award of recognition for out- 
standing service to the men and wo- 
men of the Armed Services was pre- 
sented to the Gymkana troupe. 

The award to the troop was made 
during the annual presentation of 
awards to volunteers, held at the La- 
Fayette Square USO club in Washing- 
ton. 

William H. Press, chairman of the 
USO operating committee, presented 
thet awards. The Gymkana troupe re- 
ceived its recognition certificate as a 
result of the show which the traveling 
troop gave last fall for the men and 
women of the Armed Services. 



the smart set's guide 
to dining and dancing 

Palladian Room 

SANDE WILLIAMS and his or- 
chestra offer music that is an 
invitation to dance. Dinner 
from 6; dancing from 9:30 p.m. 

Blue Room 

BARNEE conducts the famed 
Barnee-Lowee Orchestra for 
your dancing pleasure. Enter- 
tainment and floor show night- 



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Allen — Cook 

Carolyn Allen, to Howard L. Cook, 
Jr., Maryland student. 
Anderson — Ashe 
Mary Elizabeth Anderson, to Thomas 
Joseph Ashe, Maryland graduate. 
Aronson — Gorman 
Frances Bernice Aronson, Maryland 
alumna, to Eugene Paul Gorman. 
Barton — Johns 
Meredith Anne Barton, to William 
Evans Johns, graduate of Maryland. 
Bashore — Kossler 
Marilyn Bashore, Maryland gradu- 
ate, to Lt. Albert Kossler, USA, gradu- 
ate of Maryland School of Pharmacy. 
Bealle — Brown 
Dorothy Cecelia Bealle, Maryland 
graduate, to Paul Benedict Brown, 
Maryland senior. 

Bennett — Glazer 
Dena Bennett, Maryland alumna, to 
S/Sergt. Paul E. Glazer, W.S.A.F., 
Maryland alumnus. 

Bennett — Oakes 
Barbara Ann Bennett, Maryland stu- 
dent, to Randall Voorhees Oakes, Jr. 
Boat — Brubaker 
Barbara Jane Boat, to Robert L. 
Brubaker, Maryland graduate. 
Boatner — Moore 
Edith Peake Boatner, Maryland stu- 
dent to Ack Williams Moore. 
Bosley — Glover 
Anita Doris Bosley, Maryland stu- 
dent, to Midshipman William Roland 
Glover, II. 

Boyd — Harmon 
Betty Anne Boyd, to Maurice Joseph 
Harmon, Jr., Maryland alumnus. 
Brohawn — Rhodes 
Jane Estelle Brohawn, to Walter E. 
Rhodes, Jr., Maryland graduate. 
Brown — Clemens 
Barbara Jean Brown, Maryland stu- 
dent, to Lt. Robert A. Clemens, Mary- 
land graduate. 

Capps — Sardone 
Eleanor LaVerne, to Jerry George 
Sardone, Maryland student. 
Cassidy — Sappe 
Elizabeth Clarke Cassidy to Milton 
Charles Sappe. Both are graduates of 
Maryland's School of Pharmacy. 
Cave — Schymik 
Elizabeth Ann Cave, Maryland stu- 
dent, to Walter S. Schymik, Tau Betta 
Pi, and Phi Kappa Phi, Maryand 
graduate 

Chinn — VanLowe 

Constance Spencer Chinn, to Henry 

Augustus VanLowe, Maryland alumnus. 

Clark — McCormick 

Gwendolyn Louise Clark, to Gerald 

Austin McCormick, Maryland alumnus. 



4« 



Courtney — Nyman 

Elizabeth Courtney, Maryland stu- 
dent, to Darwin Bruce Nyman. 
Deckelbaum — Pastor 
Jean Deckelbaum, to Samuel Pastor, 
Maryland alumnus, now serving in the 
Army. 

Dodson — Forward 
Martha Neil Dodson, to Robert Lull 
Forward, Maryland student. 
Drayer — Taylor 
Dorothy Mae, to Donald B. Taylor, 
Maryland student, Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon. 

Duffie — Robson 
Shirley Oorinne Duffie, to Frank 
Lawton Robson. Both are Maryland 
students. 

Dykstra — Stevenson 
Janet Marie Dykstra, Delta Gamma, 
Maryland student, to Willard D. Ste- 
venson, Alpha Gamma Rho, Omicron 
Delta Kappa, and Alpha Zeta. Mr. 
Stevenson received his Masters Degree 
at Maryland. 

Eberts — Ashton 
Jeanine Ruth Eberts, to Charles 
Hillyer Ashton. Both are seniors at 
Maryland. 

Eissmann — Smith 
Eva Maria Eissman, to Edward Loh- 
man Smith, Jr., Maryland student. 
England— Tysdal 
Nancy Ann England, Maryland 
senior, to Lt. (j.g.) Royal M. Tysdal. 
Evans — Guender 
Mary Anne, Maryland senior, to Lt. 
John H. Guender, Maryland graduate. 
Feldman — Elkins 
Earleen Lenoir Feldman, Maryland 
student, to Richard L. Elkins, Mary- 
land graduate. 

Fogle — Fisher 
Donna Joy Fogle, to Ralph V. Fisher, 
Maryland graduate. 

Gardner — Townsend 
Suzanne Gardner, Maryland alumna, 
Kappa Alpha Theta, to 2nd Lt. Joseph 
Boatman Townsend, Jr., USMC, Mary- 
land alumnus, Phi Delta Theta. 
Gill— Forbes 
Betty Fay Gill, Maryland alumna, 
to Jacques Constant Bennebroek 
Forbes, Maryland graduate school stu- 
dent. 

Gordon— Edell 
Lois Gene Gordon, to Marvin Lewis 
Edell, senior at Maryland University 
School of Pharmacy. 

Greaver — Goode 
Doris Lee Greaver, to Henley Milton 
Goode, Jr., Maryland alumnus. 
Greenberg — Kolodin 
Nancy Greenberg, to Melvin Kolodin. 
Both are students at Maryland. 
Groeper — Dresely 
Delores Ann Groeper, Maryland stu- 
dent, to Lt, John William Dresely, 
USMC. 

"Maryland" 



Haffner — Ellison 
Sondra Eileen Haffner, to Raymond 
Robert Ellison, Maryland graduate, 
Phi Alpha. 

Hall— Fallowfield 
Janet Hall, to Frank Fallowfield; 
Maryland graduate. 

Halpern — Fur man 
Nancy Halpern, Maryland student, to 
I'aul Larry Furman. 

Hogan— O'Neill 
Mary Jean Hogan, to Pvt. John 
Murray O'Neill, Maryland alumnus. 
Horowitz — Goldman 
Rhoda Horowitz, Maryland junior, to 
Yeoman 1/c Leonard Goldman, U.S.N. 
Ingrao — l)e Vincent is 
Rosemary Kathryn Ingrao, to Dr. 
Michael Louis DeVincentis, graduate of 
Medicine. 

Iveson — Flynn 
Leila Joy Iveson, to Richard Walker 
Flynn, Maryland graduate. 
Jackson — Ferchak 
Annabelle Jackson, to William Fer- 
chak, U.S.A. F., Maryland alumnus. 
Johnson — Buchheister 
Lila Mae Johnson, graduate of Mary- 
land School of Nursing, to Harry E. 
Buchheister, Jr., Maryland graduate. 
King — Lynn 
Sarah Jane King, to H. Robert Lynn. 
Both are Maryland students. 
Kolodny — Finkelstein 
Joann Kolodny, to Gilbert I. Finkel- 
stein, Maryland graduate, and graduate 
student at Maryland. 

Laker — Mouser 
Lowell Adair Laker, Sigma Kappa, 
Maryland alumna, to Stanley Gronau 
Mouser, Maryland alumnus. 
Lewis — Van Buren 
Ann Echols Lewis, to Peter Van 
Buren, both are Maryland graduates. 
M a gruder — Clary 
Louise Dukes Magruder, graduate of 
Maryland School of Nursing, to Tho- 
mas Austin Clary, student at Maryland 
Dental School. 

Magnuson — Ainley 
Vivian Marie Magnuson, Maryland 
senior, to James Ainley, Jr. 
Malask — Goldhagen 
Bernice Malask, to Samuel Gold- 
hagen, Maryland alumnus. 
Mander — Betts 
Patricia Ann Mander, Maryland 
alumna, to Harvey Betts, Jr., Mary- 
land alumnus. 

Mangum — Torbert 
Elizabeth Jane Mangum, to John P. 
Torbert, Maryland student. Delta Tau 
Delta. 

Mateer — Seyfried 
Dorothy Louise Mateer, Maryland 
student, Pi Beta Phi, to Edumund E. 
Seyfried, Jr., Maryland alumnus. 
Maus — Cook 
Mary Helen Maus, to Arthur E. 
Cook, Maryland graduate. 

McCaffrey — Monahan 
Joan McCaffrey, to Robert Henry 
Monahan, Maryland graduate, Theta 
Chi. 

Miller — Palmer 
Shirley Jane Miller, Maryland alum- 
na, to Raymond Walter Palmer, Jr., 
Maryland graduate, and student at 
Maryland School of Dentistry. 
Mitteldorf — Ratner 
Rhoda Sue MitJfeldorf, Maryland 

"Maryland?' 



alumna, to Frederic B. Ratner. 

Murphy— Stedhen 

Doria Pal Murphy, to Dr. Anthony 
A. Stedem, Jr., graduate of Mary 

land Medical School. 

Nicholson— Duff) 

Patricia .Mae Nicholson, Maryland 
Student, to .lames Dully. 

Oppenheimer — Milhauaner 

Marian Oppenheimer, Maryland 
senior, to Richard Milhauser, Tau Kpsi- 
lon Phi, Maryland alumnus. 
Palmer — Hoppc 
Patricia Ann Palmer, to William 
Hoppc, Kappa Alpha, Maryland grad- 
uate. 

Peters Myman 
Elizabeth Courtney Peters, to Dar- 
win Bruce Nyman, Maryland student. 
Phillips — Schweizer 
Amenie Nelson Phillips, to Hans 
Donald Schweizer. Both are Maryland 
students. 

Piatt— Joh 
Anne Piatt, to Lt. Raymond A. Joh, 
Jr., USAF, Maryland alumnus. 
Porter — Leas 
Betty Jean Porter, to George F. 
Leas. Both are students at Mary- 
land. 

Possell — Tennant 
Sallie Patricia Possell, to Richard 
Tennant, Maryland alumnus. 
Purnell — Moseman 
Jacquelyn Faith Purnell, Maryland 
senior, to John William Moseman, III, 
Maryland student. 

Rashbaum — Raigrodski 
Eunice Gertrude Rashbaum, Mary- 
land alumna, to Pinchos Raigrodski, 
student of Maryland Graduate School. 
Rhodes — Hulse 
Betty Lou Rhodes, to Richard J. 
Hulse, Maryland alumnus. 

Rosenblatt — Schneider 
Leonora Rosenblatt, Maryland grad- 
uate, to Alan I. Schneider, also a Mary- 
land graduate. 

Schramm — DTake 
Mary Elizabeth Schramm, Maryland 
student, to Robert G. Drake, senior at 
Maryland. 

Sherman — Sanborn 
Emilie B. Sherman, Pfc. James M. 
Sanborn, Maryland alumnus. 
Smith — Harleston 
Irene Gaillard Smith, to Robert Haig 
Harleson, Maryland graduate. 
Smithson — Nida 
Joanne Helen Smithson, Pi Beta Phi, 
to Edward Robert Nida, Tau Kappa 
Epsilon. Both are Marvland students. 
Steltz— Kebler 
Eleanor Dorothy Steltz, to Victor 
Lyman Kebler, Maryland graduate. 
Sterling — Hilton 
Muriel Sterling, to William Hilton. 
Both are Maryland graduates. 
Stringer — Hyde 
Janet Elaine Stringer, to Rowland 
Hyde, Maryland graduate. Mr. Hyde 
is a veteran of Korean service, was a 
member of Maryland's boxing team 
and took part in the Sugar Bowl win, 
'48. 

Sutherland — Mullins 
Arlene Frances Sutherland, Sigma 
Kappa, Maryland graduate, to Charles 
Edward Mullins. 



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Thompson — Esham 

Marilyn Anne Thompson, to Powell 
Wesley Esham, Maryland alumnus. 
Thompson — Stoy 
Patricia Ann Thompson, Maryland 
graduate, to Dutton G. Stoy. 
Wolter — Fletcher 
Joan Frances Wolter, to Pvt. Pey- 
ton B. Fletcher, 3d, U.S.A., Maryland 
alumnus. 

Wood — Higginbotham 
Linda Cameron Wood, to Ensign 
Allen Bane Higginbotham, USN, Mary- 
land School of Law graduate. 
Wostein — Prigal 
Elaine Wostein, to Herman Prigal, 
Alpha Zeta Omega. Mr. Prigal is at- 
tending Maryland's School of Phar- 
macy. 

Vernon — Kinna 
Mary Lou Vernon, to Marlin Albert 
Kinna. Both are Maryland students. 
Yoakum — Bierly 
Cellie Marie Yoakum, to Robert F. 
Bierly, Maryland graduate. 




Barrett— Atkinson 

Judith Atkinson, to Richard E. Bar- 
rett. Both are Maryland graduates. 

Beebe — Lohr 
Betty Jean Lohr, to Don Scott Beebe, 
U.S.A. Both are Maryland alumni. 
Boyer — Givler 
Patricia Edna Givler, to Henry Han- 
son Boyer, II, Maryland graduate. 
Devola — Lunn 
Barbara Jayne Lunn, Maryland 
alumna, to Albert Devola. 

Disharoon — Nelson 
Dorothy Jean Nelson, Nursing '44, 
to James Gregory Disharoon, on No- 
vember 7, 1953. 

Edge — McLaughlin 
Dorcas Ann McLaughlin, Nursing 
'52, to Pfc. Turner Wilson Edge, on 
January 16, 1954. 

Gluye — Wheeler 
Patricia Wheeler, Nursing '52, to 
Charles B. Gluye on July 25, 1953. 
Gray — Butler 
Iris May Butler, to William B. Gray, 
Maryland alumnus. 

Gray — Krammer 
Jean Kramer, to William Dorsey 
Gray, Jr., Maryland alumnus. 
Hernandez — Kimball 
Ruth Lois Kimball,, Maryland 
alumna, to Casimiro Hernandez, Mary- 
land Alumnus. 

Herndon — Fohrman 
Phyllis Loy Fohrman, to William 
W. Herndon. Both attended Mary- 
land. 

Huyett — Ames 
Joyce Elaine Ames, Maryland gradu- 
ate, Sigma Kappa Soroity, to Charles 
Brinham Huyett, U.S.A., Pi Kappa 
Alpha and Alpha Phi Omega, Mary- 
land graduate. 

Kiser — Crow 
Eugenia Crow, to Dr. William S. 
Kiser. Both are Maryland graduates. 
Kressin — Herbst 
Beverly Sheila Herbst, Maryland 
graduate, to Louis Charles Kressin. 
Leech — Lynde 
Sally Ann Lynde, to Wade Rigby 



Leech. Both are Maryland graduates. 

Marlow — Cochran 

Gracia Alice Cochran, to William 
Haworth Marlow, Maryland alumnus. 

Meyer — Crowson 

Muriel Ruth Crowson, Kappa Alpha 
Theta, to Lowell Louis Meyer. Both 
are Maryland graduates. 

Moffat — Hughes 

Margaret Elizabeth Hughes, Mary- 
land alumna, to Robert Joseph Moffat, 
Maryland graduate. 

Moffett — Snyder 

Marily Orme Snyder, Alpha Lambda 
Delta, and Kappa Delta, Maryland 
alumna, to Lt. Raymond C. Moffett, 
Jr., U.S.A.F., Alpha Tau Omega, Mary- 
land alumnus. 

Mullinix — Roos 

Phyllis Jean Roos, Maryland alumna, 
to Thomas Price Mullinix, Maryland 
student. 

Newlin — Sapp 

Miriam Sapp, Maryland alumna, to 
Kenneth Edward Newlin. 

Orlove — Chaikin 

Myra Dorothy Chaikin, to William 
S. Orlove, Maryland graduate. 

Potter-McCeney 

Elizabeth Ann McCeney, Maryland 
alumna, to Emaign Thomas Moore 
Potter, U.S.N.R. 

Reber — Renninger 

Fae L. Renninger, Nursing '53, to 
Wayne A. Reber, Jr., on January 31, 
1954. 

Repplier — Brown 

Cynthia Hayes Brown, to Lt. Theo- 
dore Silkman Repplier, Jr., U.S.A.F.R., 
Maryland graduate. 

Rosendorf — Dunand 

Anne-Marie Dunand, to Dr. Stanley 
Bernard Rosendorf, Maryland gradu- 
ate. 

Ryland — Long 

Elizabeth A. Long, to Lt. Henry J. 
Ryland, USAFR. Both are Maryland 
graduates. 

Seefer — Briggs 

Barbara Jane Briggs, Maryland 
senior, to Paul Christian Seefer, Jr., 
U.S.A. 

Strain — Delaney 

Mary Delaney, Nursing '47, to 
Thomas Strain, on January 9, 1954. 

Van Vliet — Brown 

Betty Brown, to Thomas Van Vliet, 
senior at Maryland. 



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Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Rosner 
Wolman announce the birth of a 
daughter, Katherine Lynn Wolman, on 
February 25, 1954. 

Mi-.Wolman class of '51, was 
manager of Maryland's boxing team 
and is an Air Force veteran of the 
Korean war. 

Polite Little Terp 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Polite an- 



48 



"Maryland" 



nounce the birth of their third child, 
Kerry Kurz Polite, on October 11, 1953. 

Mr. Polite is of the clas of '50 Agr., 
Sigma Nu. Mrs. Polite is of the class 
of '45 nursing and the class of '46 
A & S, Alpha Xi Delta. 

Arrives In Florida 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald F. Clements 
announce the birth of a son, Davis 
Frederick, on St. Patricks Day in 
Lakeland, Florida. Both are Mary- 
land graduates. Mrs. Clements was 
Mary Ann Fazzalari, A&S '48, and Mr. 
Clements Engr. '51. 

School Of Nursing Babies 

To Mr. and Mrs. Wm. F. Behlke, a 
son, William W. on January 7, 1954. 
Mrs. Behlke was Ellen Louise Colli- 
son, '45. 

To Dr. and Mrs. John E. Goeckler, a 
daughter, on October 28, 1953. An- 
other daughter, born on Novemher 13, 
1952 in Germany. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Bert Sharp, a 
daughter, Diane Kay, on November 29, 
1953. Mrs. Sharp was Clara H. Fras- 
co, '45. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Harry S. Ferguson 
Jr., a son, Stephen Lee, on July 21, 
1953. Mrs. Ferguson was Hazel Phyl- 
lis Elliott, '47. 

To Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Duvall, a son, 
Robert Brien, on July 29, 1952. They 
have two boys and one girl. Mrs. 
Duvall was Dorothy Simpson, '46. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Wm. H. Fisher, Jr., 
a daughter, Jane Scharf, on February 
13, 1953. This is the fourth daughter. 
Mrs. Fisher was Nellie Scharf, '40. 

To Captain and Mrs. Nicholas Mall- 
is, a son, Steven Michael, on December 
15, 1953. (In France.) Mrs. Mallis was 
Jean Nilsson, '47. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Richard Kline, Jr., 
a daughter, Denise Carol, in April, 
1953. Mrs. Kline was Janet Eyster, 
'52. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Louis Klag, a 
daughter, Maetha Cecilia, on May 21, 
1951. Mrs. Klag was Joan Cowles, '48. 
The Klags have a son, Louis, Jr., 
six years old. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Martin Berler, a 
son, Mark Henry, on December 16, 
1953. Mrs. Berler was Harriet Roslyn 
Pollack, '48. 




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Dr. Skinner 



Dr. William Skinner 

(A Belated Tribute) 

By WAI.TKR II. MacINTIRE 

The demise of Doctor William Wool- 
ford Skinner, March 10, 1953, 
marked the close of a career that was 
distinguished by universal recognition 
and appreciation of his academic at- 
tainment and substantial achievement 
in the implementation of the findings 
obtained through chemical research in 
Federal and col- 
laborating labora- 
tories, years of ser- 
vice in his chosen 
field, should prove 
an inspiration to 
those who would 
serve as did he, 
earnestly, faith- 
fully, and unselfish- 
ly. Our "W. W." 
possessed a keen 
sense of humor, a 
pleasing candor, a 
persuasive manner. He was always 
sympathetic of the problems of others 
and intensely loyal to ideals and to 
individuals. Admired by all, he was 
loved by the many to whom he had ex- 
tended a helping hand and friendly 
guidance. In token of the esteem in 
which he was held, more than 150 of 
his associates assembled at the May- 
flower Hotel, December 4, 1929, to 
commemorate the culmination of his 
twenty-five years of service in U.S. 
D.A., and to present to him |an 
appropriately engraved silver service 
The combination of his sterling charac- 
teristic s and his remarkable mental 
faculties resulted in his unusual capa- 
city and success as executive and ad- 
ministrator. 

His achievements constitute a mem- 
orial of Doctor Skinner's two-score 
years of service to scientific organi- 
zations, to his Alma Mater, and to 
community, state, and Federal govern- 
ment. 

Doctor Skinner was born in Balti- 
more, Maryland on March 28, 1874, 
the son of Levin and Mary Skinner. 
After atending the public schools of 
Dorchester County, he graduated from 
Maryland Agricultural College (now 
the University of Maryland) in 1895, 
with a Bachelor of Science degree in 
agricultural chemistry. During four 
years as Assistant Chemist at that 
institution, he studied night courses at 
Corcoran Scientific School of Colum- 
bian University (now George Wash- 
ington University) and received the 
degree of Master of Science in 1897. 
Later, he studied at the Universities 
of Arizona and California, and at 
George Washington University. In 
1917, the University of Maryland 
awarded him the degree of Doctor of 
Science in recognition of his achieve- 
ments in chemistry. 



Early in his career, Doctor Skinner 
gave five years of service to the Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station of The 
University of Arizona and six months 
to the Arizona School of Mines. His 
principal work at Arizona Experiment 
Station was an investigation of the 
mineral constituents of the under- 
ground and surface waters of that 
state, and this was the beginning of 
a long career as a specialist in the 
chemistry of waters. 

In 1904, he went to Washington to 
take a position as food inspection 
chemist in the Bureau of Chemistry, 
as assistant to J. K. Haywood, Chief 
of the Insecticides and Agricultural 
Water Laboratory. Three years later, 
the laboratory became a division with 
W. W. Skinner as its Assistant Chief 
as well as Chief of the Water Labora- 
tory, which became an independent unit 
in 1914. He continued as Chief of that 
laboratory and of its successor, the 
Water and Beverage Laboratory, until 
1921, when he became Assistant Chief 
of the Bureau of Chemistry. 

When the research work of the 
Bureau of Soils were combined in 1927, 
Doctor Skinner continued to serve 
as Assistant Chief of the chemistry 
unit, which became the Chemical and 
Technological Research branch of the 
new bureau. In 1935, he became 
Assistant Chief of the Bureau of 
Chemistry and Soils and continued as 
Assistant Chief in the succeeding 
Bureau of Agricultural Chemistry and 
Engineering. He became associate 
chief in 1939, and upon the death of 
Doctor Henry G. Knight in 1942, 
Doctor Skinner became Chief of the 
Bureau. Reorganization effected the 
formation of the Bureau of Agricul- 
tural and Industrial Chemistry of the 
Agricultural Research Administration, 
and Doctor Skinner served as its Chief 
until he reached the age of retire- 
ment in March, 1944. 

In addition to his original interests 
in fields of chemistry, Doctor Skinner 
was concerned with irrigation waters, 
mineral waters, and waters for sani- 
tary, technical, and domestic purposes. 
He devoted special attention to various 
problems of industrial importance, such 
as the recovery and purification of salt 
from natural brines; development and 
standardization of analytical pro- 
cedures for agricultural products; the 
injurious effects of smelter fumes on 
vegetation; the chemistry of flavors, 
aromas, and perfumes; various carbo- 
nated beverages; development of citrus 
fruit byproducts; utilization of crop 
residues; insecticides; and the toxic 
effects of insecticides and food con- 
taminants. He always stressed the 
practical or dollars-and-cents value of 
research to agriculture, and encouraged 
especially those investigations that 
promised early economic returns. He 
became an ardent and influential advo- 
cate for the expansion of research 
leading to greater industrial utilization 
of farm products and byproducts. 

Doctor Skinner was largely respon- 
sible for the establishment of the Naval 
Stores Station at Olustee, Florida, the 



50 



"Maryland" 



Citrus Products Laboratories at Winter 
Haven, Florida and Weslaeo, Texas, 
for the Agricultural Byproducts Lab- 
oratory at Ames, Iowa, and for the 
Soybean Industrial Products Labora- 
tory at Urbana, Illinois. He visual- 
ized research on the industrial utili- 
zation of farm products in a compre- 
hensive scale that eventuated into 
the establishment of the four Regional 
Research Laboratories in Peoria, Il- 
linois; New Orleans, Louisiana; Wynd- 
moor, Pennsylvania; and Albany, Cali- 
fornia. 

For several years, in collaboration 
with the U. S. Department of State, 
Doctor Skinner supervised chemical 
research in special bureau investiga- 
tions of the claims that vegetation 
had been damaged by smelter fumes 
evolved in British Columbia, Canada, 
and he was appointed master to settle 
claims by the landowners in the north- 
eastern counties of Washington, upon 
the basis of awards made by the Court 
of Arbitration. 

Between 1910 and 1913, Doctor 
Skinner represented the Department of 
Agriculture as chairman of a commit- 
tee that included representatives of 
the states of Virginia and Maryland, 
to study pollution of the Potomac 
River and Chesapeake Bay in regard 
to conditions that affect oyster produc- 
tion. From 1922 until 1927, he was 
chairman of the Federal Food Stan- 
dards Committee. In 1938, he repre- 
sented the United States Department 
of Agriculture as a delegate to the 
Tenth International Congress of 
Applied Chemistry in Rome. 

Upon request of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation, Doctor Skinner was appointed 
by the Governor of Maryland to repre- 
sent the alumni on the Board of 
Trustees of Maryland State College, 
and for eighteen years he served as 
secretary of that board and the suc- 
ceeding Board of Regents of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, of which board 
he was chairman for seven years. 

Throughout his tenure of service in 
the U. S. Department of Agriculture, 
Doctor Skinner was active in the work 
of the Association of Official Agri- 
cultural Chemists, through committee 
assignment, as a referee on analytical 
methods for the use of Federal and 
state officials in the analysis of waters 
and beverages, and as Chairman of the 
Board of Editors of the Journal of the 
Association. For twenty-two years 
he served most effectively as secretary- 
treasurer of the Association. In re- 
sponse to a mandate from the member- 
ship in 1940, he relinquished that 
position temporarily so that the Asso- 
ciation could bestow upon him honor of 
serving as its president. Upon the con- 
clusion of that service, he resumed 
his position as secretary and treasurer, 
and upon his retirement at the 1943 
annual meeting, the Association showed 
its appreciation of his faithful services 
through presentation of a splendid 
silver and coffee service, and through 
his unanimous election to the created 
title of Emeritus Secretary and Treas- 
urer in that body. 

For forty-seven years, Doctor Skin- 



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ner was a member of the American 
Chemical Society and served several 
years as a member of the Society's 
Supervisory Commtitee on Standard 
Methods of Analysis. 

Doctor Skinner was a Mason and 
a member of Chemists' Club of New 
York, Cosmos Club of Washington, 
and was a valued frater of Alpha Chi 
Sigma, Sigma Xi, and Kappa Alpha 
b raternities. 

Doctor Skinner enjoyed friendships, 
of which he had many of long stand- 
ing. Often he referred to his obliga- 
tion to his former chiefs, Doctors 
Yviley, Bigelow, and de Schweinitz, 
whose advice and encouragement were 
largely responsible for his choice of 
the profession of chemistry rather 
than medicine. In like fashion, he was 
most generous in according to his 
associates full measure of credit for 
accomplishments obtained through col- 
laboration. He was happy to acknowl- 
edge that he had derived inspiration 
and encouragement from his loyal, 
devoted, and accomplished wife. 

The characteristics of Doctor and 
Mrs. Skinner and daughter, Jean, 
brought to their home a pleasant and 
charming atmosphere that was a de- 
light to their friends. Among the 
blessings that came to the home and 
to the retirement days of their grand- 
father were the visits of William and 
James Bird, the two sons of Doctor and 
Mrs. (Jean) Bird of Olney, Maryland. 
In our last meetings, chemistry was 
neglected while he told us of the ex- 
ploits of those two boys. 

Carson P. Frailey 

One of Maryland's most distinguished 
graduates, Dr. Carson P. Frailey, 66, 
executive vice president of the Ameri- 
can Drug Manufacturers Association 
and active in YMCA work, died recent- 
ly in his home in Washington, D. C. 

Dr. Frailey has served as president 
of the YMCA of Washington from 1944 
until 1953. He had been active in 
work of the organi- 
zation since 1926, 
and in 1949 was 
awarded a gold key 
in recognition of his 
work. 

A national leader 
in professional and 
| manufacturing phar- 
macy, Dr. Frailey 
served as a liaison 
man between the 
manufacturers o f 
prescription drugs 
Dr. Frailey an d government, sci- 

entific, regulatory and service depart- 
ments. 

He was a native of Emmitsburg, 
Md. He was graduated from Mary- 
land's School of Pharmacy in 1908. He 
once worked in a pharmacy near the 
White House, where he filled prescrip- 
tions for President Taft. 

He organized the biological and 
medical supplies required for General 
Pershing's expedition into Mexico in 
1916, and a year later did the same 
thing for the American forces in 
France. 
Dr. Frailey became executive secre- 




tary of the Drug Manufacturers Asso- 
ciation in 1923, a post he held until 
retiring in 1952. 

He was chairman of the Drugs Re- 
sources Advisory Committee of the 
Army-Navy Munitions Board from 
1939 to 1944, and later headed a simi- 
lar committee serving the Surgeon 
General of the Army. 

From 1930 until his death, he was 
chairman of the National Drug Trade 
Conference. He was a founder and 
honorary member of the American 
Foundation for Pharmaceutical Edu- 
cation and a member of the Board of 
Trustees of the United States Phar- 
macopeia. 

Surviving are his wife, Rebecca; a 
son, Carson Gray Frailey, 5047 Glen- 
brook Terrace, N.W.; three brothers, 
Clarence G., Thomas J. and William 
A., and a sister, Mrs. H. P. Freeman, 
all of Emmitsburg, and three grand- 
children. 

Frederick J. Jackson 

Dr. Frederick J. Jackson, Class of 
1916 in Dentistry, of Somerset, Mass., 
died at his home. In college he was 
active in athletics, particularly base- 
ball, and was a member of Psi Omega 
Fraternity. He had practiced his pro- 
fession in one section for the past 30 
years and for the last 17 years was 
school dentist for the Somerset School 
Department. Four fellow alumni were 
among the pallbearers and included 
Dr. Arthur W. Leary '22, Dr. John J. 
Partridge '15, Dr. Joseph C. Carvalho 
'14, and Dr. Peter F. Harrington '09. 
Dr. Johnson is survived by his wife 
Virginia and three children. 

Nelson H. Stritehoff 

Nelson H. Stritehoff, Law Class of 
1923, died at the age of 53. He had 
devoted 28 years of his life to the old 
Mercantile Trust Company of Balti- 
more, and remained with the Mercan- 
tile-Safe Deposit and Trust Company 
until his sudden death in the offices of 
the banking house. 

Mr. Stritehoff was a native of Balti- 
more and graduated from City College 
before taking his law degree at Mary- 
land. He was one of the organizers 
of the Baltimore Stock Transfer Asso- 
ciation and became its chairman, a 
position he held at the time of his 
death. He was also active in the St. 
George's Society and the Maryland 
Historical Society. 

Mason P. Morfit 

Mason P. Morfit, Law School Class 
of 1899, a veteran Baltimore attorney 
and court examiner died suddenly at 
his home in Baltimore. He is the 
father of Garry Moore,, national tele- 
vision star. Mr. Morfit was 76 years 
old. 

His law practice was started 55 years 
ago and in 1933 he was appointed 
examiner for the circuit courts of Balti- 
more City and had a wide circle of 
friends among members of the Balti- 
more bar. 

Survivors in addition to Mr. Moore 
include his wife, the former Miss 
Louise Harris, a son, Dr. H. Mason 
Morfit and a daughter, Mrs. H. D. 
Bredehom. 



.2 



"MaryiaiuT 



A. Moulton McNutt 

A. Moulton McNutt, 1906, at Mary- 
land Agriculture College, died recently 
of a heart ailment. He had practiced 
law in Camden, New Jersey since 1912 
and lived in Collingswood. He was 
Municipal Judge of Collingswood at the 
time of his death, a position he had 
held for 17 years. He was active in 
politics until activity on the part of 
the judiciary was banned by the State 
Supreme Court. In 1932, he sought 
the Republican nomination for State 
Senator in a primary opposing the late 
Albert S. Woodruff. 

For nearly 50 years, Mr. McNutt had 
been a member of the First Methodist 
Church at Collingswood and at his 
death was a member of its official 
board and superintendent of the Sun- 
day School. He was also a lay preacher 
and taught a Bible class. Surviving 
are his widow, Edith T., a son, M. 
Tyler and a daughter, Mrs. Mildred 
E. Weikel. He had been president 
of the Maryland Club of Pennsylvania 
and for a period was president of the 
University of Maryland Alumni Club, 
in the Philadelphia area. He had long 
been a strong supporter of the Alumni 
Association. 

Lt. Col. Francis P. Wells 

Lt. Col. Francis P. Wells, Army 
medical corps (ret.), bacterial ogist and 
astronomer, died while visiting in Fort 
Lauderdale, Fla. He has been in ill 
health for several years. 

Col. Wells, who made his home in 
Arlington, Va., graduated from Mary- 
land in 1934. In 1938 he received his 
medical degree from Georgetown uni- 
versity. He was commissioned in the 
medical corps the same year. 

After serving as physician and bac- 
teriologist at several military hos- 
pitals, Col. Wells was appointed head 
of the bacteriology laboratory at Gor- 
gas hospital in the Canal Zone. 

In 1947, he retired because of phy- 
sical disability, but took an increased 
interest in astronomy and conducted 
classes at the National Capitol Astron- 
omers society. 

Col. Wells is survived by his wife, 
Alice, and a son, Leslie Endicott Wells, 
and a brother, Col. James B. Wells, 
stationed with American forces in 
Austria. 

Lt. Wm. B. Blackhall 

The second of the Blackhall twins, 
of Faulkner, Md., U. S. Air Force 
lieutenants ha^ been killed in an 
accident. 

Lt. William B. Blackhall died in a 
jeep wreck at Clovis, N. M. 

His twin, Lt. Alexander A. Blackhall 
jr., died Dec. 9, 1952, in a jet plane 
crash at Chandler, Ariz. 

Lt. A. A. Blackhall is buried in 
Arlington cemetery. 

The pair joined the air force to- 
gether in 1951 after graduation from 
the University of Maryland where they 
were enrolled in the College of Agri- 
culture and the advanced air force 
ROTC. 

Both were honor graduates of Glasva 
High school, Charles county, and both 

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won four-year scholarships to Mary- 
land. 

They shared the same interests since 
boyhood, winning many prizes for 
stock breeding and judging at state 
and county fairs. 

Lieut. Blackhall is survived by his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Blackhall, 
senior, who live near La Plata, in 
Charles county; two sisters, Mary Ele- 
anor Blackhall and Mrs. Isabel Thomp- 
son, wife of Dr. Arthur H. Thompson, 
Pomology professor at Maryland. 

The University's Arnold Air Society, 
of which both men were members, at- 
tended the funeral services. Lieut. 
Blackhall was adjutant-recorder of the 
Frank P. Lahn squadron of the society 
during the academic year 1951-52. 
Edgar S. McCeney, Sr. 

Edgar S. McCeney, Sr., 79, Maryland 
alumnus, died recently. He was, for 
15 years, with the Prince Georges 
County assessors office in Upper Marl- 
boro. Following his retirement in 1931 
he operated the family farm, "Thorp- 
land Farm," north of Upper Marlboro. 
Prior to 1916, Mr. McCeney was head 
of the bookkeeping department of the 
American National Bank, now the 
Hamilton National Bank, in Washing- 
ton, D. C. Survivors in addition to his 
wife, Mrs. Emily L. McCeney, are three 
sons, Benjamin Bird McCeney of Sil- 
ver Spring, Edgar S. McCeney, Jr., of 
Riverdale, and George D. McCeney of 
Richmond, Va. 

Vivian Francis Roby 

Vivian Francis Roby, '12 Engineer- 
ing, died suddenly at his home in Balti- 
more. He was born in Pomfret, Md. 
After graduating he was employed by 
the State Roads Commission but gave 
up this work to become a teacher. He 
taught in the schools of Baltimore 
County until he entered service for 
active duty in World War I. He served 
in the 313th infantry until the war 
ended. 

Mr. Roby was appointed to the fac- 
ulty of the Polytechnic Institute in 
1948. He had been in ill health for 
several years but continued his active 
interest in alumni affairs of the Uni- 
versity. He is survived by his wife, 
Mrs. Evalyn Roby; two sisters, Mrs. 
Frances Cox and Mrs. Grace Barnes of 
Washington, D. C, and a brother, Mr. 
Archibald Roby of Pomfret. 

Guiger H. Clagett 

Guiger Harry Clagett, member of 
the class of 1895, passed away recent- 
ly at the 202 year old family home, 
near Upper Marlboro. He was a well 
known tobacco grower and farmer, and 
was one of a family of eleven children. 
He was a direct descendent of Thomas 
Clagett, who settled in Southern Mary- 
land 284 years ago. He had cele- 
brated his 80th birthday, but had been 
in a critical condition since January 
following a fall from which he suffered 
a broken hip. 

William Z. Davidson 

William Z. Davidson died at the 
National Institute of Health, Bethesda, 
of blood ailments. 

He earned his bachelor and master's 
degrees at Maryland. 

Mr. Davidson was studying for a 



doctor's degree in social and industrial 
psychology at Ohio when he became 
ill. 

In addition to his parents, he is sur- 
vived by two brothers, Maj. Sidney L. 
Davidson of Fort Ord, California, and 
Daniel J. Davidson; two sisters, Mrs. 
Dorothy Dolleck, and Miss Ruth L. 
Davidson, all of Washington, D. C. 

The Diamondback commented, "to all 
members of SAM, the Psychology De- 
partment, and anyone else who knew 
him .... deepest regrets over the 
recent death of your friend, William 
Z. Davidson. For those who didn't know 
Bill, he took his undergraduate and 
graduate work at our university and 
he was certainly one of the most mod- 
est and best liked men on the campus. 
On March 4, at the National Institute 
of Health, Bill died from cancer of the 
blood .... he was only 24." 

B. Lucien Brun, D.D.S. 
Dr. B. Lucien Brun, a prominent fig- 
ure in Maryland dentistry for almost 
a half century, died in Baltimore on 
February 19. Born in Baltimore on 
April 11, 1884, Dr. Brun graduated 
from the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery with honors in 1905. After 
five years of general practice in his 
native city, he began preparing for his 
long and highly successful career in 
his special field. After , taking post- 
graduate courses at 
St. Mary's Hospital 
and Trinity Hospit- 
al, in Milwaukee, 
Wis., and at the 
German Hospital, in 
New York City, he 
returned to Balti- 
more where, in 1911, 
he began a practice 
limited to oral diag- 
nosis, exodontia, and 
oral surgery. 

Dr. Brun had been 
closely associated 
with the Dental Department of the 
Johns Hopkins Hospital from its be- 
ginning in 1912 till his retirement in 
1950. He served as Head of the Di- 
vision of Oral Surgery from 1912 to 
1946 and as Chief of the Department 
from 1946 to 1950. During his thirty- 
eight years at Hopkins he was affili- 
ated with many of the leaders in the 
medical profession. Through this rich 
experience he developed a fine appre- 
ciation of the values to be derived 
from improved medico-dental relations. 
As an earnest and effective advocate 
of this important phase of dental prog- 
ress he made one of his many con- 
tributions to the advancement of his 
beloved profession. 

Another important facet of Dr. 
Brun's career was his membership on 
the faculty of the Baltimore College 
of Dental Surgery. Returning to his 
alma mater in 1906 he spent four years 
as a Clinical Instructor and as the Lec- 
turer on Art and Its Dental Applica- 
tions. In 1912 he renewed his teach- 
ing activities, lecturing on Local An- 
aesthesia, Exodontia and Oral Surg- 
ery. From 1917 to 1923 he was the 
Professor of Oral Surgery. In all the 
ways possible to an alumnus he gave 




Dr. Brun 



54 



"Maryland" 



aid and encouragement to his alma 
mater. 

In May of 1917 Dr. Bunn was com- 
missioned as a First Lieutenant, D.C., 
U.S.A. He arrived in France in June 
as a member of the Johns Hopkins 
Base Hospital, Unit 18, First Division, 
First Army. During his almost two 
years of service with the American and 
the British Expeditionary Forces in 
France and Germany he achieved a rec- 
ord of distinguished service. Through 
his highly capable and resourceful work 
in oral and facial surgery he was able 
to demonstrate to a wide circle of medi- 
cal associates the excellent potentiali- 
ties inherent in the training and prac- 
tice of a dental specialist in oral surg- 
ery. In World War II Dr. Brun re- 
sponded eagerly to his country's call 
for the assistance he was so well pre- 
pared to render. In 1942 he was made 
Chairman of the Military Affairs Com- 
mittee of the Third Service Command, 
Chairman to organize the Dental Sec- 
tion of the Third Service Command for 
Selective Service, and Consultant with 
the Procurement and Assignment Serv- 
ice. He was awarded the Congression- 
al Selective Service Medal in 1946. 

As Chairman of the Dental Centen- 
ary held in Baltimore in March of 1940 
Dr. Brun directed one of the great- 
est meetings in the history of dentistry. 
He received many elective honors from 
his fellow dentists: Vice-President, 
American Dental Association; Presi- 
dent (two terms), Maryland State 
Dental Association; and President, 
Alumni Association of the Baltimore 
College of Dentistry, Dental School, 
University of Maryland. For several 
years he was a member of the Mary- 
land State Board of Dental Examiners. 
He was a diplomat of the American 
Board of Oral Surgery and a member 
of the American Society of Oral Surg- 
eons. He was an honorary member of 
the Southern Society of Orthodontists 
and the National Dental Association of 
Bolivia. His other professional mem- 
berships included the Gorgas Odonto- 
logical Society, Omicron Kappa Upsi- 
lon, Baltimore City Dental Society, 
American Medical Association, Medical 
and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland, 
Baltimore Association of Dental Surg- 
eons, American Academy of Dental 
Science, New York Academy of Dental 
Science, International Academy of 
Dentistry, and American College of 
Dentists. A Past Commander of the 
Military Order of Foreign Wars, he 
was also a member of the Military Or- 
der of World Wars and the Maryland 
Selective Service Reserve Association. 
He was a member of the Maryland His- 
torical Society and Rotary and held 
memberships in a number 
clubs. 

Dr. Brun is sui-vived by 
Mrs. Mary (Brown) Brun, 
daughters, Miss Amicie Brun and Mrs. 
Richard I. Lane. 



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Diamond 

Diamond, a sister group to Gate and 
Key, has been officially recognized, the 
Student Life committee approving its 
constitution. 

Marianne Allen, of Alpha Delta Pi, 
got the idea for establishing the local 
society from similar groups at other 
schools. Sorority presidents, backed 
the idea, as did the Panhellenic council. 

A committee of one representative 
from each sorority was formed, and a 
constitution was drawn up. Assistant 
Dean James H. Reid, Business and 
Public Administration, helped Miss 
Allen with her plans. 

Members of Gate and Key, fraternty 
recognition society, also aided. 

Officers are Miss Allen, president, 
and Ann Gerkin of Pi Beta Phi, secre- 
tary. 

Requirements for election to the 
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For Civic Interest 

Dr. Thomas B. Symons, University 
president, stressed need for greater 
interest in all levels of government, 
speaking before nearly 200 youths from 
state-wide YMCA organizations in 
Central Auditorium. He stated, "The 
hope of the future for maintainance of 
our freedom is that our young folks 
become thoroughly familiar with the 
national, state and local governments." 

"It is more and more apparent," he 
continued, "that home rule is being 
adopted in all phases of government." 
Asked whether this included the Uni- 
versity, he replied: "Yes, for Mary- 
land and all phases of government." 

Following Dr. Symons' speech, Le- 
roy W. Preston, fifth legislative dis- 
trict state senator, reviewed "critical 
issues in State politics" facing candi- 
dates for the governorship. 

Senator Preston called for higher 
wages for teachers. "We are losing 
too many teachers because we are 
not giving the teaching profession the 
support it deserves," he said. 



Terrapin Riflemen Successfully 
Defend Championship 

Title Holders Total 1439; California Second with 1422. 
Terps Top 90 Schools. 




IN "THE OLD LINE" TRADITION 

The Maruland AFROTC Rifle Team which journeyed to the University o] Oklahoma to de- 
feat the Sooners. They flew to Oklahoma in an Air Force it 'J. r > piloted by i ''ii- Joseph R. Am- 
brose, Professor of Air Science & Tactic*, University of Maryland. Thi YFROTC Rifle Team 
scored 1421 out of a possible 1500. Cadet Robert Martoiana. member of the 2nd string All- 
Anverica Rifle Team, scored 289 out of a possible 300. 

Pictured, left tn right, are : Col. Joseph R. Ambrose, PAST ; Larry LomoUno, Robert Mar- 
torana, Richard Ooreu. Jerry Sauerbrei, Linn Savaue. 1/ Bat. Paul I). Barnes, Coach of the 
team, and Captain Irving B. Schoenberg, Range Officer at the. t nin-rsily of Maryland. 




pionship won 



aryland's rifle team, 
coached by Master 
Sergeant Paul Barnes, 
topped some 90 schools 
competing in 14 sec- 
tional meets to suc- 
cessfully defend the 
National Rifle Cham- 
last year. Maryland's 



five crack marksmen compiled a score 



of 1439 out of a possible 1500, only 
three points off their record perform- 
ance last year. 

The Terrapins doing their shooting 
at Annapolis where they topped Navy 
by 24 points and outdistanced GW and 
Georgetown, were the first to repeat 
since the Navy teams of 1934-35. 

The Terps fashioned their total this 
way: Jim Wells, 292; Bud Barton, 289; 



58 



"MarylanoV' 




Coach Barnes 



Bob Martorano, 288; 
Dick Gorey, 285; 
Linn Savage, 285. 

Trailing the Terps 
in the standings 
compiled by the Na- 
tional Rifle Associa- 
tion here were Cali- 
fornia, 1422; UCLA, 
1421; St. John's, 
Brooklyn, 1421, and 
Tennessee, 1420. 

T. Y. Wu, of Cali- 
fornia, shot a record 
295 to lead the in- 
dividual shooters. Maryland's Bob 
Martorano hit for 289 in that competi- 
tion to finish fifth. 

The Maryland score fell just three 
points shy of the national record of 
1442 which they set in the Nationals 
of last year. 

Their unofficial record in intercollegi- 
ate competition stands at 1449, scored 
against VPI. 

Maryland's Bob Martorano edged out 
Navy's Montelle Knapp in individual 
competition with a score of 289 to grab 
the top position for the Eastern section. 
Martorano's score stood fifth highest 
nationally. 

Terps Swamp Oklahoma 

The University's AFROTC rifle team 
gained some revenge for the Terps' 
Orange Bowl loss when it defeated the 
Oklahoma ROTC squad 1421-1382 at 
Oklahoma. 

Robert Martorana led the Terps with 
a 289 out of a possible 300. Linn 
Savage, Larry Lomolino, Richard 
Gorey and Jerry Sauerbrei rounded out 
the team, which took the longest flying 
trip ever taken by a Maryland rifle 
team. 

Terps Win 8-Way Match 

On the same day that a Terrapin 
team was downing Oklahoma, another 
five man Maryland team took first 
place over eight teams at Boston. 

With Jim Wells and Rick Waters 
each shooting 287, the Maryland five 
scored 1418 to its nearest competitor 
M.I.T.'s 1406. This match also was a 
revenge as the Terps placed ahead of 
third place Army who had beaten the 
Old Liners in a previous match. Ernie 
Reddle, Bud Barton and Andre Caradec 
aided the Terp cause. Other teams fn 
the meet were Norwich University, 
Coast Guard Academy, Harvard, Bos- 
ton U., and Yale. 

Maryland 1449; V.P.I. 1418 

Maryland's crack rifle team dealt 
Virginia Tech its first defeat of the 
year here by outshooting the Gobblers 
1449 to 1418. 

It was the highest score fired by the 
Terps. Bill Barton of Maryland turned 
in the best score with 292 out of a pos- 
sible 300. Tom Gilligan registered a 
285 to ran kas Tech's top competitor; 
1442 is the national record, set by 
Maryland last year. If the National 
Rifle Association certifies the Terp tar- 
gets it will be a new National record. 

"Cooked" Again 

Maryland Alumnus shooting ace, 
Arthur Cook, added to an imposing 
list of rifle trophies by capturing ffie 




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60 



grand aggregate in the final of the 
D.C. Gallery Rifle championships on 
the National Shooters' Supply range 
at Muirkirk. 

Cook, world's champion Olympic star 
as well as national championship win- 
ner, topped individual performance 
with an 1181. 

Cook also won the National Rifle As- 
sociation's sectional indoor champion- 
ship with a 792x800 at the National 
Shooters Range in Beltsville. 

Ernest Reddel, of Maryland, won the 
Sharpshooter class with 763. 

Maryland 1430; Navy 1414 

Maryland's crack rifle team outshot 
the Navy sharpshooters 1430 to 1414. 
Jim Wells took top honors for the 
match firing a 293 out of a possible 
300. Bud Barton scored 288 with Dick 
Gorey and Bob Martorana each tallied 
284. "The Terp's fifth man, Andre Car- 
adec totaled 281. 

Maryland 1915; S. Carolina 1795 
The ROTC rifle team defeated South 
Carolina ROTC and broke all Carolina 
range records. 

Dick Gorey fired a 96 and Robert 
Martorana, team captain, fired a 95 
to break the individual standing range 
record of 93. 

The total score for the match was 
1915 to 1795. 

Individual scores for the match were: 
Robert Martorana, 387; Dick Gorey, 
385; Linn Savage, 385; Larry Lomo- 
lino, 380; Jerry Sauerbrei, 378. 



FOOTBALL 



AUNT MARTHY 

With a few seconds remaining in 
the football game, the star back dashed 
toward the enemy's goal. Two oppo- 
nents hit him. But he kept on rolling. 
Two more nailed him and down he 
went, a foot from pay dirt, just 
as the gun went off signaling the end 
of the half. "Goodness me!" ejacu- 
lated Aunt Marthy, seeing her first 
game, "What a boy! They had to 
shoot him to stop him!" 




GRID CO-CAPTAINS, '54 




To Coach All-Stars 

aryland's Coach Jim Ta- 
tum will be in charge 
of the College All-Stars 
in their game against 
against the Detroit 
Lions, National Foot- 
ball League champions 
in Chicago, August 13. 

He will have the job of building 
a defense to stop 
the Lions Coach 
Bud Wilkinson of 
Oklahoma, as one 
of Tatum's assis- 
tants, will direct 
the All-Stars' of- 
fense. Other assis- 
tant coaches will 
be named later. 
Tatum was an as- 
sistant on the staff 
headed by Bobby 
D o d d o f Georgia 
Tech in 1952. 

Both Tatum and 
Wilkinson feature 
the split-T attack. coach Tatum 

Turkey Day Game 

Maryland will provide its football 
followers with a Thanksgiving Day 
game this year. The game originally 
scheduled with Missouri for Saturday 
November 27 will be played on turkey 
day, November 25. 

The Army-Navy game is scheduled 
for Philadelphia November 27 and will 
be on national television, potent oppo- 
sition for any "live" counter attraction. 

The shift, a smart move, will give 
football fans a chance to see the Tatum- 
terps end the season and also afford 
the opportunity of attending the Army- 
Navy game or watching it on TV. 

The Missouri-Maryland game also 
will feature Dad's Day, with special 
effort to have students attend the game 
accompanied by their fathers. 

November 6 will be Homecoming 
featuring the North Carolina State 
game. 








Schedule 


Sept. 


IS 


Kentucky 


Oct. 


1 


U.C.L.A. (night) 
Wake Forest 


* 


16 


North Carolina 




22 


Miami (night) 




:{o 


Soutb Carolina 


•Nov. 


6 


North Carolina S 


• 


13 


Clemson 


• 


•Jo 


Qeorur Washington 


* 


25 


Missouri 



Dick BieUki 
Fullback 



John Irvine 
Center 



State 



•//(Hue games at Oollege Park. 

Alumni 28; Varsity 6 

A powerful group of Maryland 
Alumni All-Stars were too much for 
the '54 varsity team in the feature of 
the "M" Club's triple sports day, the 
alumni winning, 28-6. 

The alumni team of eight All-Ameri- 
ca's, 30 graduate players and four bor- 
rowed freshmen, scored once in the 
first, twice in the second and again in 



"Maryland" 



the third. The varsity's sole tally came 
in the first quarter. 

Jack Scarbath, Washington Red- 
skins, piloted the alumni tossing for 
one touchdown and scoring- another 
from the one-foot line. In the first 
quarter he tossed the ball back to Chet 
Hanulak, after being trapped. Chet 
raced 22 yards to the touchdown. 

Russ Dennis, a gangling junior end, 
scored at 6:10 of the same period for 
the varsity, catching a 26-yard toss 
from quarterback Charley Roxold after 
a 74-yard drive. 

Late in the first quarter the grads 
moved down to the Varsity 16 and on 
the first play of the second period, 
Dick Nolan took a rifle-like pass from 
Scarbath at the 5 and scored. The 
alumni had gone 63 yards in eight 
plays for the score. 

Karney Scioscia plowed over from 
the 1-yard line for the Alumni's third 
touchdown. Three perfect strikes by 
Scarbath ate up most of the 53 yards 
needed. 

The final touchdown came with 
eight seconds to go in the third, 11 
plays moved the ball 73 yards and 
Scarbath went over for the score. 

In Mexico 

A letter from Peggy Maslin Wilhelm 
'39 included a picture of past and 
future Marylanders in Mexico. The 
occasion was a fall lunch at the Wil- 
helm home when coach Tom Mont of 
the Terrapins was on hand to give pre- 
season coaching advice to Mexico's 
Polytechnic Institute Team. Mrs. Wil- 
helm is the daughter of Bill Maslin 
'09 and her husband is manager of 
the Mexico City Bureau of the Mc- 
Graw-Hill Publishing Company. Peggy 
says, "Our latch string is out to any 
Marylanders vacationing down here — 
or as we say in Spanish "Aqui es su 
casa." 

Following the visit, Tom Chisari was 
selected as Mexico's coach of the year 
by the Football Writer's Association. 
He has a seventeen year record of 
outstanding achievements including St. 
John's High School in Washington as 
a freshman at Washington and Lee 
and as a triple threat back at Mary- 




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MARYLAND IN MEXICO AT A BARBECUE AT THE WILHELM'S HOME 

Left to tight back: Tom Chisari, Amttdn Ghisari, Jean Mont. Tom Mont, Peggy IfasKtl 
\\ ilhrlm, .lolni Willietm. 

Front: Ui88 Amtidii Cllinari, Stevie Mont. Charles Withelm, Larry Wilhelm, Hick Wilhelm, 
and Jeffie Mont. 



land. He was head coach at Catholic 
University in Washington at the age 
of 25 and in 1951, became athletic 
director and football coach at the 
American High School where he made 
championship contenders of chronic 
losers. Chisari is known as "The son 
of mirth" in Mexico. His unfailing 
good humor has earned him both the 
admiration and respect of his players 
and the public. The fact that he was 
awarded Coach of the Year honors 
with a second place club is even greater 
tribute to his coaching ability. The 
Mexico News Weekly saw fit to devote 
a 2 page spread to the 31 year old 
Italian who makes a practice of com- 
bining work with play. 



In California 

The old saw about "a small world 
after all" is set forth in an interesting 
news letter from Mrs. Jim (Mary Sea- 
lock) Brasher, 743 Scott Avenue, San 
Bernardino, California. 

Mrs. Brasher tells of the automobile 
trip from San Angelo, Texas, where Jim 
formerly coached, to San Bernardino 
Valley College, where Jim is coaching 
now, via the East Coast, across country 
and down the Pacific Coast shore line. 

After describing their visit to the 
Black Hills, Yellowstone National Park, 
Yosemite, Las Vegas, etc., Mary tells 



of camping near a narrow 100 year old 
lonely mountain road in California and 
there meeting up with Jean and Hal 
McGay. Jean formerly taught at Mary- 
land while Hal (Assistant Trainer for 
the football team) was in B & PA. 
He's with a Los Angeles insurance firm. 

Later they also met up with Bob 
Dean and Scoop Evans, as well as Ben 
Wolman, former boxing team manager. 

Mrs. Brasher goes on to tell about a 
trip to Mexico City where Brasher's 
San Bernadino gridders lost to Mexico 
Poly, coached by Maryland'"s Thorn 
Chrisari. In Mexico they also met Jim 
Negra, studying medicine. He used to 
work for Colonel George Weber at 
College Park. 

"I will always have a warm spot in 
my heart for Dr. Byrd and Big Jim 
Tatum," Mary writes, "for recommend- 
ing my Jim for this position. We like 
this job and California." 

Mrs. Brasher and Jim are taking six 
hours at night from UCLA Extension 
and Mrs. Brasher is teaching in one 
of the elementary schools. 

They have a daughter, Linda. 

Mrs. Brasher enclosed clippings from 
California papers in which Jim lauds 
the T formation he teaches and credits 
it to Coach Tatum. 

One of the teachers at San Berna- 
dino Valley College formerly taught 



62 



"Maryland," 




Zoology at Maryland. She is Dr. Ber- 
nice F. Pearson. 

In 1951, because of her reputation as 
an outstanding biologist, she was 
named by the American Red Cross to 
a special national health committee. 
This six-member committee prepared 
a booklet, "Blood and the Nation's 
Health," which has been distributed by 
the Red Cross to colleges throughout 
the nation as an aid in teaching health 
education. 



WRESTLING 

Penn State 22; Maryland 6 

aryland's wrestlers fin- 
ished on the short end 
of a 22-6 score as Penn 
State won its 33rd 
straight meet. 

The Krousekrushers 
were saved from a 
goose egg score by Maryland's Fischer 
brothers. 

123 Pound — Hal Buers (Ponii State), de- 
Cialoned Frank Alfaro, 6-3. 

130 Pound — Rob Homan (Penn State), dc- 
pisioned Roiiey Carroll, 5-1. 

137 Pound — Larry Fornicola (1'onn State), 
decisioned Dan Little, 5-2. 

147 Pound — .Terry Maury (Penn State), de- 
cisioned Dick Hartnett, 14-5. 

157 Pound — Bob Fischer (Md.), declsloned 
Bill Krebs, 2-1. 

167 Pound — Ernie Fischer (Md.), decls- 
loned Joe Mumphries. 3-1. 

177 Pound — Joe Krufka (Penn State), 
pinned Bob Drake, 3 minutes 47 seconds. 

Heavyweight — Bill Obely (Penn State), 
pinned Carl Everley, 3 minutes 59 seconds. 

Maryland 17; N.C.S. 13 

Maryland, winners of the Atlantic 
Coast Conference wrestling champion- 
ship, defeated North Carolina State, 
17-13. The Sully Krouse-coached Terps 
finished with a 4-0 Conference record. 

Maryland had to do some last- 
minute shuffling of talent in the face 
of a surprising 13-6 lead built up by 
State in the early matches. Krouse 
used 157-pounder Bob Fischer at 167 
pounds, 167-pounder Bob Drake at 177 
pounds and 167-pounder Ernie Fischer 
at heavyweight. They came through 
with 11 straight points. 




STRONG POINTS 

Bob unit Ernie Fischer, Maryland's wrcst- 
linil brothers — but good! 

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Ernie now has won 51 of 52 dual 
meet matches while Bob has won 41, 
lost one and tied one. 

123-pounde — Rosser (.State) won over Al- 
.11 Illegal slam by Alfaro. r>-0. 

130-pounda Carroll (Md.) declsloned 

Nicks, 

I.'i7 pounds — Little (Md.) declsloned Cross- 
Inn. I. 6-0. 

1 1? pounds— Tomlln (NCS) declsloned Hart- 
ii. Mi. 8-4. 

157 pounds — Taylor (NCS) pinned Lesaeg, 
..nds of first period. 

I r.7 pounds — Hob Flsclicr (Md.) pinned 
Kaplan. 1 :16 of third period. 

177 pounds — Drake (Md.) declsloned Beck- 
er, 4-2. 

Heavyweight— Ernie Fisher (Md.) declslon- 
ed Leone, 7-1. 

Maryland 26; N. Carolina 6 

Maryland clinched the ACC crown 
by winning its third straight ACC 
match, 26-6, over the University of 
North Carolina. 

The Terps' stone-wall brother act of 
Bob and Ernie Fischer pinned their op- 
ponents, cousins Arthur and Miles 
Gregory of North Carolina. 

123-pounds — Frank Alfaro (Md.) declsloned 
Harry Pawllck (N.C.), 4 1. 

130-pounds — Roney Carroll (Md.) pinned 
Harold Schwartz (N.C.) in 4:52. 

137-pounds — Danny Little (Md.) pinned 
Zack Waters (N.C.) in 7:35. 

147-pounds — Pete McGee (N.C.) declsloned 
Don Hartnett (Md.), 11-10. 

157-pounds — Harvey Bradshaw (N.C.) de- 
clsloned John Lessig (Md.), 6-1. 

167-pounds — Bob Fischer (Md.) pinned 
Arthur Gregory (N.C.) in 6:55. 

177-pounds — Ernie Fischer (Md.) pinned 
Miles Gregory (N.C). 

Heavyweight — Bob Drake (Md.) declsloned 
Carl Barkley (N.C), 8-2. 

VMI 18; Maryland 15 

Virginia Military Institute won 18-15 
over Maryland. Maryland's two de- 
pendables, the Fischer brothers, won 
their matches. 

Going into the deciding heavyweight 
match the score was tied at 15-15. VMI 
and the Terps each scored two falls. 

118 Pounds — Ronnie Bryan (VMI) and 
Frank Alfaro, drew. 

127 Pounds — Roney Carroll (Md.) defeated 
Bill Graber, 11-3. 

137 Pounds — Stuart Jones (VMI) defeated 
Don Little, 11-10. 

147 Pounds — Jeff Robertson (VMI) pinned 
Don Hartnett, 5 minutes. 

157 Pounds — Tom Massie (VMI) pinned 
Jack Lessig, 8 :51. 

167 Pounds — Bob Fischer (Md.) pinned 
Bill Berry, 5 :13. 

177 Pounds — Ernie FiFscher (Md.) pinned 
Miles Nowltzky, 6 :47. 

Heavyweight — Nick Servidlo (VMI) de- 
feated Carl Everly, 8-5. 

The Fischer Brothers 

Wins by the Fischer brothers have 
been accepted as campus routine on a 
parity with the hourly ringing of the 
chapel chimes. 

Over their four years of competition 
they have aided coach "Sully" Krouse 
tremendously in his efforts to bring 
wrestling to a respected position among 
the major varsity sports at Maryland. 
"They've done a great deal for wres- 
tling at Maryland," proclaimed "Sully" 
in his appreciation of their efforts. 

Started in High School 

In Baltimore Southern's seventh 
grade, Ernie, who was a year ahead of 
his brother, entered an intramural 
wrestling contest to win first place in 
the 100 pound division under Coach 
"Sully" Krouse. 

Ernie wanted to participate in a 
varsity sport, and because he was 
small, realized that wrestling was made 
to order for him. Soon he was the 
best on the team in his weight class. 

Bob's career began shortly thereafter 



64 



and he also went on to win the 100 
pound intramural division. 

In sixty-three bouts in four years at 
Southern, the Fischer brothers had 
failed to win only four matches. They 
both won the Maryland state champion- 
ship twice in their last two years at 
Southern. Ernie, who was voted the 
outstanding high school wrestler in the 
state both of those years, is the only 
wrestler ever to have received this 
award twice. 

They joined Maryland's wrestling 
team and were once again under the 
tutelage of "Sully" Krouse. In their 
first match as freshmen in 1951 against 
the Cherry Point Marines, they began 
a precedent of winning for Maryland. 
Bob got his first college pin in his 
second match and Ernie's came in his 
third. 

By the end of the season both were 
undefeated while winning thirteen 
matches between them. Ernie had fin- 
ished the season by pinning his last 
four opponents. 

Their first varsity competition was 
against West Virginia and both broth- 
ers won decisive matches. Ernie's pin 
enabled the Terps to win 14-12. They 
both then won 1951-52 Southern Con- 
ference Championships and Ernie was 
voted the outstanding wrestler of the 
tournament. 

This was the season that saw Bob's 
only collegiate loss, when he was 
pinned by Dan Frey of Penn State. 

D. C. Champions 

Maryland won the annual D. C. Sen- 
ior A.A.U. wrestling tournament at 
the Anacostia Naval Receiving Station, 
the Terps scoring 59 points. Runner- 
up was Naval Receiving Station with 
24 points. 

The Krousekrushers ran away with 
everything except the 157 pound cham- 
pionship. 

Ernie Fischer, for the third year in 
succession, copped the championship 
in his weight class, 167 pounds, while 
brother Bob was giving his lame knee 
a rest in preparation for the Nationals. 

Terp Carl Longanecker pinned last 
years 137-pound winner Elvin Rush, 
Navy Receiving Station, and Maryland 
football tackle Mike Sandusky de- 
throned the Receiving Station's Gene 
Kroskey in 11 seconds. Maryland's 
Johnny McHugh won at 115. 

Loses In Finals 
For the NCAA nationals at Norman, 
Oklahoma, Coach Sully Krouse had 
entered the two 
Fischer brothers. 
However, Bob pulled 
up with a knee in- 
jury and could not 
compete. 

Ernie, at 167, 
went to the finals 
where he was shad- 
ed by Joe Solomon, 
Pittsburgh, 6-2. In 
the preliminary, 
quarter finals and 
semi finals Ernie 
had won three bouts. 

"MaryUmd!' 




Coach Krouse 





1954 LACROSSE 


Co-Coaches — Jack Faber and Al Heagy 


Mar. 20 


Washington & Lee 


27 


Virginia 


•Apr. 6 


Harvard 


* 7 


Dartmouth 


* 10 


Williams 


• 17 


\./< y 


• 20 


Syracuse 


• 24 


Princeton 


* 28 


Loyola 


30 


North Carolina 


May 1 


Duke 


8 


Army 


15- 


Johns Hopkins 





Coach Heagy 



* II a in c games at College Park 

Maryland 9; W & L 2 

aryland's powerful Jack 
Faber-Al Heagy coached 
lacrosse team laid down 
'a torrid attack on a 
muddy field to smash 
Washington and Lee, 
9-2, in the season's 
opener for both squads. 

The Terps put on spurts in the sec- 
ond and fourth quarters to turn the 
game into a runaway despite a brilli- 
ant performance 
by W&L's star 
goalie, Fletcher 
Lowe. 

The end of the 
first quarter saw 
the score tied at 
1-1. Then, in the 
second Terps' 
Dick Corrigan 
and Rennie 
Smith baffled 
W&L's defense- 
men and racked 
up two points 
apiece. Corrigan was unassisted, while 
Smith picked up assists from Phil 
Green. 

Maryland scored after nine min- 
utes of the third quarter when Dick 
Corrigan relayed a toss from Smith 
past Lowe. 

In the final period Maryland once 
more broke loose for three scores. 



Maryland 18; Virginia 7 

Maryland's smooth-functioning la- 
crosse team ruined Virginia's 1954 de- 
but by swamping the Cavaliers 18-7. 
It was Virginia's 
worst defeat since 
lacrosse was re- 
vived at Char- 
lottesville follow- 
ing World War II. 
Except for the 
firs'; half of the 
opening period, the 
Terps had the 
highly-rated Cava- 
liers outmaneuver- 
ed and produced 
points as they 
chose with a classy 
close attack. 
George Corrigan 
led the way with 
four goals while 




Coach Faber 




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Phone — Executive 3-8120 

815 TENTH STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 



c. 


Engel's Sons 




Incorporated 




Established 1850 


Fruits and Vegetables 




District 7-0995 


522 - 


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Washington, D. C. 




Charlie Wicker and Ben Goertemiller 
scored three apiece. 

Maryland 15; Harvard 5 

Maryland scored its 19th straight 
lacrosse victory over Harvard, 15-5. 

The Terps were led by Charlie Wick- 
er and Charlie Longest with three 
goals each. 

Maryland Goalies Sal Cavallero and 
John Livingstone had 13 and 4 saves. 

Maryland 20; Dartmouth 7 

Maryland's brother combination of 
George and Dick Corrigan proved too 
much for Dartmouth as Maryland won, 
20-7. 

The Corrigans scored four goals each 
and assisted on eight others while 
playing only half the game. 

Wicker and Dick Corrigan scored 
again to make it 3-2 Maryland. 

In the second quarter Maryland 
scored eight times, the visitors twice. 
The Terps went on a scoring spree, 
the ending, 11 to 4 half. 

The Terps took 58 shots, 25 saved 
by Dartmouth's Wetzel while Goalies 
Sal Cavallero and Don Livingstone pre- 
vented 13 and 2, respectively, of Dart- 
mouth's shots from scoring. 

Maryland 16; Williams 3 

In the "M" Club's triple spring 
sports program the Terps defeated 
Williams, 16-3. Five straight for the 
powerful Faber-Heagy-coached team. 

Maryland took a 3-0 lead in the first 
and increased it to 6-0 before Williams 
made its first score in the second. The 
Terps led, 7-3, at the half, scored one 
goal in the third and finished with 
eight in the final. 

Charles Longest was Maryland's 
leading scorer with five goals. George 
Corrigan had three. 



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^ StudswJtA. ^ 

We offer special discounts 
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66 



"Maryland" 




PalumJxi- and QcviM&i Acdio+tal Gkampd. %4p4 Only 7eam 
WUU Iwo VUUi. 

Terps Take Boxing Titles 

Cronin Clouters Top Virginia, Army, Syracuse, Penn 
State, C.U.A. For Eastern Championship. 

Coyne, Garber Annex Individual Honors. 

Next Tournament At College Park As Bill Cobey 
Becomes EIBA Prexy. 

aryland's boxing team 
won the Eastern In- 
tercollegiate champion- 
ship at Charlottesville, 
terminating the 5-year 
reign of Syracuse's 
mitmen. 

In point score Mary- 
land totalled 35, Virginia placed second 
with 2(5 while Army and Penn State 
showed for third with 25 each and 
Syracuse was fourth with 20 points 
and C.U.A. trailed with 2. 

Individual championships were won 
by Maryland's southpaw heavyweight, 
17G pound Leo Coyne, and pint sized 
Gary Garber, at 125. 

Coach Frank Cronin's truculent Ter- 
rapins, had the title 

r __ . ,, pretty well loaded 

| on the buckboard, 
tagged for College 
Park, by placing 
five contestants i n 
the finals. 

Coyne defeated 

i Jack Coleman, Penn 

W a ■ Pi State, with a clean 

cut decision in the 

finals, after having 

similarly taken the 

measure of Catholic 

University's Tom 

DeCicco in the semi- 

finals k Coyne had 

previously defeated 

rugged Syracuse 






Gary Oarlier 

National and 
Eastern Champ 



Leo i 'ail in 

Eastern 

rii n in ii 



Coach Cronin 



Sam Alexander, 
heavy. 

Garber, former all-Army 118 pound 
champ, well under par for the 125 
class in weight, reach and height, 
dropped Virginia's Bill Banerdt for 
two clean knockdowns, the only knock- 
downs in the finals, to cinch the deci- 
sion and the title. In the semi-finals 
Garber breezed to a decision over 
Army's courageous little Tom Wein- 
stein. 

At 132 Maryland's Vince Palumbo 
lost a split decision in the finals against 
Gerry Jaffe, Syracuse, who withstood 
a terrific rally by Palumbo, which had 
Jaffe reeling about the ring. It was not 
a popular decision. Palumbo, in the 
semi-finals, had defeated Penn State's 
Bob McMath and, in the opening round, 
the Terp had taken the nod over Vir- 
ginia's Bob Rush. 

At 139 Eric Hintze, Maryland begin- 
ner, lost in the title round on a split 
decision to Army's Haywood Hansell. 
In the semi-finals Hintze had turned 
in a real classy performance to take 



the talented John Granger, champion 
from Syracuse. 

In the 147 pound class Maryland's 
Bob Theofield lost in the tournament's 
opening round by decision to Andy 
Maloney, Army. 

At 156 Maryland had no entry. 

Maryland's Bill McGinnis lost in the 
finals at 165 by decision to Sonny 
Nichols, Virginia. It was a good, close 
scrap that might just as well have gone 
the other way. McGinnis, in the semi- 
finals, had decisioned Ainu's Harry 
Pvuhf. 

At 175 Maryland's Ronnie Rhodes 
lost out in the semi-finals by a decision 
to Bruce Yancey, Syracuse. It was 
close and hard fought. 

The Terp team had traditional Mary- 
land team spirit. Two of their number 
won titles. Three lost heartbreaking 
decisions. But the No. 1 kick the whole 
team got out of the deal was that the 
team won the championship. 

New Champions '54 

125— OAKY GARBER, MARYLAND 
i:i2 — Gerry Jaffe, Syracuse 
13!) Haywood Hansel, Army 
147 — Jack Stokes, Penn state 
L56 Pete Potter, Virginia 
1G"> — Sonny Nichols, Virginia 
17S — Adam Kois, Penn State 
H— LEO COYNE, MARYLAND 

Other Maryland conference titles 
were Southern Conference wins in '37, 
'39 and '47 (Coach Heinie Miller). 



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Tournament '55 

Not only did Frank Cronin's Mary- 
landers win the Eastern Intercollegiate 
boxing championship, but College Park 
was also awarded the 1955 tournament. 
Furthermore, to 
make it a great box- 
ing year for Mary- 
land," William W. 
Cobey, Maryland's 
graduate manager 
of athletics, was 
elected President of 
the Eastern Inter- 
collegiate Boxing 
Association for the 
ensuing year. He 
succeeds Eddie La 
Fond, of Catholic 
University. 

Maryland had once before, as a 
"guest" entry, won the Eastern title. 
That was in '42 (Coach Bobby Gold- 
stein) when the Terps placed 5 men in 
the finals and won the team title with- 
out taking a single individual champ- 
ionship. 

Palumibo, Garber Win 
National Titles 

Vince Palumbo, 132, and Gary Gar- 
ber, 119, each brought Maryland a 
national boxing title at the N.C.A.A. 
tournament held at Penn State. Mary- 
land was the only team to win two 
titles and powerful 
Wisconsin aced out 
the Cronin crew by 
only two points on 
second places. 

In the final at 132, 
smart-boxing Pal- 
umbo took a unani- 
mous decision over 
4 | John Stigletz, LSU, 

M, _a m ! 3 " ' 

<i< \ Palumbo had 

moved into the final 
bout on a convincing 
semi-final decision 
over Jose Rodriquez, 
San Jose State, and 
an equally impres- 
sive unanimous nod 
over Idaho's Ralph 
Wadsworth. Palum- 
bo was generally 
credited with being the "class" of the 
tournament. He had just about every- 
thing. 

Gary Garber, at 119, won in a dis- 
play of whistling left hooks against 
Roy Kuboyama, Wisconsin, 2-1. 

Garber's adversary is a transfer 
student from Hawaii to Wisconsin. He 
is a former A.A.U. national amateur 
champion. 

Garher had moved into the finals on 
a decision over Michigan State's Shedd 
Smith, heavier punching in the final 
round swinging a split decision to the 
little Terp. 

Smartly coached, ably handled, the 
clean-boxing, clean-hitting Terps were 
a distinct credit to Maryland and to 
Head Coach Frank Cronin. 

Thus Maryland's all-time boxing rec- 
ord now shows four national champions 




Vince Palumbo, 
National Champ 




Alperstcin 



68 



as Palumbo and Garber 
join Benny Alperstein, 
who won titles in 19a/ 
and 1938. 

At 147, Maryland's 
courageous Bob Theo- 
field lost by decision in 
the quarter-finals to 
Idaho's Russ Lundgren. 
At 174, in the semi- 
finals, Ronnie Rhodes, 
Maryland, made a he- 
roic but losing stand, dropping the de- 
cision to Adam Kois, Penn State, who 
went on to the national championship. 

Leo Coyne, Maryland's Eastern In- 
tercollegiate heavyweight champion 
found his 178 pounds inadequate 
against Idaho State's husky Mike Mc- 
Murtry. It ended on a TKO in the sec- 
ond frame. McMurtry later won the 
title. 

Bill Mclnnis, Maryland's 165 pound- 
er did not make the trip to the na- 
tionals due to weight difficulty. Terp 
"little fellows" Eric Hintze and Guido 
Capri also stayed at home. 

National champions are: 
119— GARY GARBER, MARYLAND 
125 — Seiji Naya, Hawaii 
132 — VINCE PALUMBO, MARYLAND 
139 — John Granger, Syracuse 
147 — Herb Odom, Michigan State 
156 — Bobby Meath, Wisconsin 
165 — Gordon Gladson, Washington State 
178 — Adam Kois, Penn State 
Tlnl. — Mike McMurtry, Idaho State 

The teams finished in this order 

with points as shown: 

Wisconsin 19 Idaho State 9 

Maryland 17 San Jose State 6 

Penn State 11 Virginia 5 

Wash. State 9 N.C. A & T 4 

LSU 9 Idaho 3 

S'yracuse 9 Hampton Inst. 2 

N.C.A.A. national team champion- 
ships are usually won by teams with a 
large number of entries, as points are 
awarded for winning or competing in 
bouts prior to the final round. Had 
Maryland had two more men to go as 
far as the semi-finals the Terrapins 
might well have won the national team 
championship. Winning two individual 
titles speaks well for Coach Cronin, a 
former track star who laced on his first 
pair of gloves in his senior year at 
Maryland, never lost a round in the 
ring and won a Conference title. 

Sixteen Champs 

The addition of Gary Garber, Vince 
Palumbo, and Leo Coyne boosts the 
number of Maryland champions to 16. 
The previous 13 were, chronologically: 
Stewart McCaw, 175 pounder, who won 
Southern titles in '34 and '35; Ivan 
Nedomatsky, 135-145, who won in '35, 
'36, '37; Benny Alperstein, 125-135, who 
won in '38 and '39 and also took NCAA 
national titles in '37 and '38; Tom 
Birmingham, 127, who won in '37; New- 
ton Cox, 165, who won in '39; Frank 
Cronin, 155, who won in '39; Herb Gun- 
ther, 175, who won in '41; Eddie Rieder, 
155, who won in '47 and '48; Kenny 
Malone who took the heavy title in 
'47; Spencer Hopkins, who won at 
130 in '49; Don Oliver 155 pound 
winner in '50, 165 winner in '51; 
Ronnie Rhodes, 165 pound winner in 
'52; Calvin Quenstedt, Heavyweight 
winner, '53, Eastern Intercollegiate 
Tournament. 

"Maryland" 




Mr. Quattrocchi 



Aided Coaching 
Andy Quattrocchi (Phys. Ed. '51), 
one of Maryland's best boxers and a 
terrific hitter, has been according a 
great deal of assistance as coaching 
aide to Head Coach Frank Cronin. 

Andy's '48 win in the Coliseum 
against LSU's Doug Elwood, is rated 
as Terp boxing's top 
thriller along with 
the Ivan Ncdomat- 
sky's '39 win over 
Duke's Danny Far- 
ran. 

Quattrocchi came 
to Maryland in '47 
from Camp Lejeune, 
N. C, where he 
served as a Navy 
corpsman with Ma- 
rines. Warrant Offi- 
cer S y d Fischel 
scouted Andy with, 
"He belts like Max Baer on a good 
night." 

Handy Andy, an excellent boxer, won 
most of his bouts by the K.O. route, in- 
cluding a knockout win against Michi- 
gan State's Frankie Capraro in the '48 
Sugar Bowl. 

Andy's bad luck loss to LSU's Tad 
Thrash for the National title in '50 is 
unparalled in collegiate ring history. 
Thrash entered the ring with a slight 
abrasion over one eye. At the conclu- 
sion of the first round the M.D. halted 
proceedings due to eye injury. One 
judge had Maryland ahead, the other 
had L.S.U. leading. The referee had 
it even. When the latter had to call 
it he gave Thrash a plus sign and 
Andy a minus. Quattrocchi thus lost 
a title by the margin of a math sign. 

Maryland 4'/ 2 ; Army V/z 

Maryland's boxing team was never 
headed as they turned in a neat win 
over West Point's good team, 4]/ 2 
to 3V 2 . 

Gary, Garber, at 125, scored first for 
Coach Frank Cronin"s truculent terps, 
over Tom Weinstein. The game keydeT 
took quite a box barrage of flailing 
leather. 

Guido Capri, Maryland 125 pounder, 
seemed to have an edge over Army's 
Paul Merola, in a hectic tit-tat-toe 
brawl. Capri scored a knockdown in 
the first but tired in the third. It was 
ruled a draw. 

A very classy exhibition of boxing 
and solid counter punching came from 
Vincent Palumbo, Terp 139 pounder, 
as he won all the way from courageous 
Haywood Hansell, Army. 

Army's Andrew Maloney seemed to 
have a slight edge against Bob Theo- 
field, Maryland, in rounds one and two, 
but Theofield came back strong in the 
third to earn a draw. This at 147. 

Army's Don Rundell had too much 
experience for Maryland's game Royd 
Smith, at 156, the latter being shaded 
in all three rounds. 

Maryland's Billy Mclnnis, drew a 
rugged opponent in Army's Harry 
Ruhf. Both punched solidly, boxed 
well, and enjoyed each other's respect. 
It was called a draw. 

Ronnie Rhodes, Maryland 175 
pounder, also had a tough assignment 

"Maryland" 




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WASHINGTON, D. C. 



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70 



in Army's tall Ed Mcndell. Rhodes 
had to stay "inside" to reach Mendell. 
The Terp Texan did just that for a 
neat edge in all three rounds and the 
decision. 

Leo Coyne, Maryland heavyweight, 
started a bit too late against Army's 
husky Frank Hicks. The West Pointer 
got the nod. 

Charley Reynolds, of Washington, a 
referee since 1932 and rated as one of 
the nation's top flight arbiters, was 
third man. 

It was Maryland's final home match. 

L. S. U. 6; Maryland 2 

L. S. U. 6— Maryland 2. That's what 
the man said and that's what the 
newspapers said, as Maryland's boxers 
took the short end at Baton Rouge. 
L. S. U. has never lost a home meet. 

L. S. U. fielded two four year men, 
Bobby Jackson and Calvin Clary. They 
also fielded two freshmen, Jack Frank- 
lin and Crew Peele. 

At 125 L. S. U.'s Bob Freeman won 
from Terp Garry Garber. The de- 
cision was o.k., a good hoxer bowing 
to a very good one. 

At 132 Maryland's Guido Capri had 
the edge right along over LSU's John 
Stiglets. It was called a draw. 

Vince Palumbo, Maryland's good 139 
pounder, appeared to have won hand- 
ily from Bobby Jackson. It came up 
for Jackson. The New Orleans press 
didn't like this one. 

Bob Theofield, Maryland 147 pound- 
er, suffered a TKO in round three. 
Bob was behind on points at the time. 

At 156 Coach Frank Cronin for- 
feited to LSU when Royd Smith showed 
up with an arm injury. It was the 
right thing to do. 

At 165 Maryland's Bill Mclnnis got 
another one of those "draws" after 
outboxing LSU's Jack Franklin. 

Maryland's Ronnie Rhodes, won froni 
Bill Clayton at 178. The Texas Terp 
had all three innings by wide margins. 

In the unlimited bout Crow Peele, 
a very good heavyweight, won for LSU 
over Leo Coyne, on a TKO in the 
3rd. 

Frank Bono, of Lake Charles, La., 
refereed. No judges. 

M.S.C. 4'/z, Maryland 3'/z 

Undefeated Michigan State shaded 
Maryland, 4% -3V 2 , in a hard fought 
match at East Lansing. The Spartans 
had to come from behind to nose out 
the Terps. 

At 125 Maryland's little Gary Gar- 
ber, spotting height and reach to 
State's great Hawaiian scrapper, Chok- 
en Maekawa, fought a smart aggres- 
sive battle to win the honors and 
clinch them with a convincing knock- 
down. 

Guido Capri, Terp 132 pounder, put 
up a great battle to decision Max 
Jozwiak. 

At 139 Maryland's Vince Palumbo 
gave away too much weight and 
dropped the nod to Norman Andrie. 

Terp beginner Tony Esposito was 
outclassed, at 156, by State's experi- 
enced Herb Odom. Maryland's coach, 
Frank Cronin, properly halted it be- 
tween rounds two and three. 



Terp Bob Theofield, moved up to 
156, held State's good George Sisinni 
to a draw. 

At 165 hard-punching Tom Hickey 
won for State after a close bout with 
Maryland's Bill Mclnnis. 

A surprise one-point win for State's 
Bill Greenway over Maryland's Ronnie 
Rhodes, after a nip and tuck 178 yound 
setto, clinched the meet for State. 
Rhodes was coming like a prairie fire 
in round 3 with Greenway apparently 
on the way out. However, Rhodes 
started too late and ran out of time. 
The score, 29-28. 

Maryland's Leo Coyne, boxing sharp- 
ly, took the measure of a game guy in 
State's Jack Reilly. 

Lou Jallos, former pro boxer, was 
third man and his officiating met with 
approval of all concerned. 

Maryland 4'/ 2 ; Virginia 3'/z 

Maryland's boxers defeated Virginia 
at Charlottesville, A l A to 3y 2 . 

At 125 the Terps' Gary Garber 
seemed to have won over Bill Banerdt. 
It came up even. 

At 132 Maryland's Vince Palumbo 
turned Virginia's Bob Rush every 
which way but loose to win with ease. 

Grice Whitely, the Cavaliers' star 
139 pounder, decisioned Maryland's 
Ernie Hintze. 

Bob Theofield, sharp punching Terp, 
stopped Virginia's Billy Young in the 
third. 

At 156 Maryland forfeited to Vir- 
ginia's Peter Potter. 

Billy McGinnis, Maryland 165 pound- 
er, appeared to have an edge or at the 
least, a draw. The nod went to Vir- 
ginia's Sonny Nichols. 

Ronnie Rhodes, Maryland, 178, won 
by forfeit. 

With the meet tied, 3% to SV 2 , Leo 
Coyne turned in a masterful heavy- 
weight performance to outclass and 
outpunch Virginia's Bill Creech. 

Joe Bunsa, C.U.A., refereed. No 
judges. 

In the dual meet season Maryland 
compiled a 50/50 record, winning from 
Army, Penn State and Virginia while 
losing to Michigan State, L.S.U. and 
Syracuse. 




"Liza, honey, oit yon pore oV pappy tin: 
OOOker spaniel. Mali lap is cold." (Ski-U-Afah) 



****** 

NOT FOUND 

Coed: "I've lost my whereabouts." 
Campus Cop: "They weren't turned 
in to 'Lost and Found'." 



"Maryland" 







1954 TENNIS 




thud Coach — Doyle P. Royal 


*Mar. 


29 


Cornell 


*Apr. 


fi 


Maine 




!) 


Western Maryland 


♦ 


12 


west Virginia 




16 


Duke 




17 


North Carolina Slate 




20 


Clemson 




21 


South Cnrollna 




2.". 


V.M.I. 




24 


Washington & Lee 


* 


26 


Georachtirn 


* 


28 


Joints Ilopkinn 




80 


George Washington 


•May 


;{ 


Virginia 




5 


Nnvy 


• 


7 


I'cnn State 


• 


s 


North aCroHna 


* 


10 


Wake Forc.it 




*Home games at College Park 

Cornell 9; Maryland 

aryland's tennis team 
had its spring opening 
marred as Cornell 
swept through the 
match with a 9-0 win. 
The big Red team lost 
only two sets during 
the match. 

SINGLES 
Clyde Barker defeated John Myers, 6 — 0, 
B — 3 ; (Jil Rothroek defeated Mel Huvett, 
6 — 3, f> — 3; Gerry Barrack defeated Bud 
Leightheiser, 5 — 7, i; and 6 — 3 ; Harry 
Klrsch defeated .Tack Clifford, 6 — 1. 6 — 2; Al 
FCegerreis defeated Terry Birch, 6 — 2, 6—4 ; 
Charlie Bernstein defeated Paul Eckel, 6 — 1, 
6—1. 

DOUBLES 
Baker and Rothroek defeated Myers and 
Clifford, 6 — 4, 6 — 1; Barrack and Don 
Inglehart defeated Huyett and Leighttheiser, 
4 — 6, 6 — 1 and 7 — 5 ; Kirsch and Larry 
Brown defeated Birch and Eckel, 6 — 2, 6 — 3. 

Maryland 9; Maine 

Maryland blanked Maine University 
in straight sets, 9-0. 
The summary: 

SINGLES* 

John Myers (Md) defeated Brooks Whitte- 
house. 6-3, 6-3: Bud Leightheiser (Md) de- 
feated Ernie Sutton, 6-1, 6-1 : Jack Clifford 
(Md) defeated Skip Hall, 6-1, 6-4 ; Terry 
Birch (Md) defeated Ken Barnard, 6-1, 6-0; 
Paul Eckel (Md) defeated Myles Brown, 
6-1, 6-0: Howafd Reamer (Md) defeated 
Ray Cross, 6-1, 6-2 ; 

DOUBLES 

Myers and Clifford (Md) defeated Hall and 
Sutton, 6-1, 0-3; Birch and Leighteiseh (Md) 
defeated Whitehouse and Barnard 6-3, 6-4 ; 
Dick Beckwitn and Jerry Wittsstadt (Md) 
defeated Joel Kates and Neville Bittar, 6-1, 
6-0. 

Maryland 9; W. Maryland 

Maryland swept all matches from 
Western Maryland, 9-0. Coach Doyle 
Royal's lads lost only one set. 




"He 8AY8 he got it from a fire hydrant." 
"Maryland? 



(JonqAcdulcdumA. 



. . . a* you inUi your 
/limes in Hum community 
unit throughout the 

land. We sinciirfy 
Irish you all . . . 
succi ss and 
happiness 

Imliiil unit 
in the 
years 

il In ml 

JOHN M. WALTON 
DENNIS W. MADDEN 

3510 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE 
ML RAINIER, MD. 




FASANKO MOTORS 

YOUR CHRYSLER - PLYMOUTH DEALER 




UNION 4-8700 



COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 



McLeod & Romborg 
Stone Co., Inc. 

CUT STONE 

— • — 

Bladensburg Maryland 



PHONE TOWER 9-5100 



B SUGRUE 34 



NORMAN MOTOR COMPANY 

SALES tk<ttm SERVICE 

8320 WASHINGTON-BALTIMORE BLVD. • COLLEGE PARK. MD. 



71 




lyour ^jrrienaiu ^htoili - 

Just eight miles from Washington, 
near the University o( Maryland, 
you'll find comfort and conven- 
ience at your beck and call! 

Free Parking 
Rooms & Cottages 

THE 

LORD CALVERT 

HOTEL 

On U. S. Highway No. 1 

7200 Baltimore Avenue 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



E. S. McKEOWN 



PLUMBING & HEATING 

* Contracting 
+ Repairing 

* Remodeling 
•k Appliance 

Sales & Installation 

SMALL enough to want your work 
. . . and BIG tnough to do it 

WArfield 7-7695 
College Park, Md. 




SALES 
INSURANCE 
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 

Near University of Maryland 
WArfield 7 1010 & 7-0321 
6037 Baltimore Boulevard 

RIVERDALE, MD. 



USB THE COU'ON ON THE 
LAST ['AGE 



HEATING WArfield 7 8538 

PLUMBING 
REMODELING 
JOBBING A SPECIALTY 

ROBERT F. HOFF 

6313 - 46th Ave. Riverdale, Md. 



Golf Course Urged 




Links Festival, May 3rd, 
Intended To Arouse In- 
terest In Project. 

aryland alumni, faculty 
and student linksmen 
have, for many years, 
wished that the expan- 
sion of the university 
might include a golf 
course. President Em- 
eritus Byrd visualizes 
the establishment of a course in 
augmentation of the recreational op- 
portunities for the students and faculty 
at the University. 

While no promises can be made, it 
is the expectation that there may he 
established a nine-hole course on the 
farm adjacent to Byrd Stadium after 
the construction of the new road to be 
built by the State Roads Commission 
through that area. This would permit 
ample space for a nine-hole course with 
a suitable club house in the old Meyers' 
home. 

In order to round up the interest of 
Marylanders in golf and also to lend 
enthusiasm toward perfecting a course 
as early as possible, it was thought 
desirable to have a tee-off and a big 
golf outing of the University's faculty, 
alumni, "M" Club, and Terrapin Club 
Members, as well as other friends of 
the University, at the Prince George's 
Country Club greens on Monday, 
May 3. 

Golf Coach Frank Cronin, Chairman 
of the Committee, formed to cement 
interests in advancing the establish- 
ment of a regular golf course at the 
University. All interested are invited 
to fill out the adjacently printed 
coupon. 

The committee assures you an oppor- 
tunity for playing as well as for social 
entertainment. Following the outing at 
Prince George's Country Club there 
will be a dinner in the Dining Hall at 
the University. 

Here's an opportunity to show inter- 
est as well as to have a good time. 

The program is for experts as well 
as duffers, with prizes galore: 

Monday, May 3rd. 

Prince George's Golf and Country 
Club, Landover, Md. 

From 9:00 A.M. to 

Faculty — Alumni — M Club — Terrapin 
Club (wives, husbands, girl friends, 
and boy friends) 

Entry Fee For Golf $2.00 Per Person 
Buffet Dinner $1.00 Per Person 

Ladies And Men 

A. Open Tournament 

B. Handicap Tournament 

C. Driving Contest 

D. Hole-in-One Contest 



1954 GOLF 
Head Ooaoh — Frank Cronin 



' Ipr. 2 North Carolina State 

' (> Georgetown 

7 Navy 

8 Virginia 

• 12 West Virginia 
14 Johns Hopkins 
Itl Duke 

17 North Carolina 

20 Clemson 

21 South Carolina 

• 23 William & Mar;/ 

• 20 Loyola 

28 George Washington 

30 Western Maryland 

May 7 Delaware 

• 1 Wake Forest 

14-15 Conference (ACC) Tournament 
Winston-Salem, N.C. 



'Home games at College Park 




"Oolf's a lousy game, anyhow! I'm just 
glad I don't have to play any more until 
7 :30 tomorrow morning !" 



Chairman Frank 11. Cronin, 

Physical Education Department 
University of Maryland, 
College Park, Md. 

will 
I attend University of 

will not 

Maryland Golf Outing, May .",. 

will 
1 attend huffel dinner. 

will mil 



I would like lo Mtnrl playing at. 



1 would like to play In a foursome. 



72 



'Maryland" 




Thomas E. Carroll 
& Son 

LANDSCAPE CONTRACTING 

Tree Moving 
Trees Shrubs 

Sodding Grading 

EVergreen 4-3041 

Colesville Pike, Route #3 
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 



I 



I 



Paint Contractor 

• 

Phone Lincoln 3-2337 

1019 G STREET, S.E. 
WASHINGTON 3, D. C. 



r~ 



"\ 



CUDE SONS 

COMPANY 

Nurseries 

Over 500 Acres 
ROCKVILLE, MD. 

Office & Landscape Depf. 

1318 EYE STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 

Phone: National 8-6880 



<.. 



J 



FOLLINS 

Sales and Service 

UNion 4-1500 College Park, Md. 



Georgetown 7'/i; Maryland l' 2 
Georgetown University's undefeated 

golf team beat Maryland, T'-l'j. 



Gene Howerdd, G 
trger, Md., l up ; 



t\. defeated Carl Krone 
Marlon Vlckera, G I 
lefeated James DePlro, Md., I and 8; beal 
ball, Georgetown, * and •"•. 

Kill McFerrln, Md., defeated Kick Quintan, 
<:. I '.. - up; Charlei SUcklen, <;. I'., defeated 
Ray Bellamy, Md., 2 and I : beal ball, all 
even. 

Owen Mandevllle, G.U., defeated Ekl Bit* 
herald, Mil.. 7 and •; : Joe Turneaa, >'• i 

defeated <:ns Miiiz -la, M.I.. I up; heal 

hall, Georgetown, - and I. 

Virginia <>; Maryland I 

Virginia scored a 6-] victory over 

Maryland at Charlottesville. Bill Mc 

Perren was Maryland's lone victor. He 

(lefeated Hob Kuersman, (I and 5. 

Peter Arend (V) defeated Carl Krone 
berger, 2 and 1; Dick Wells (V) defeated 
.lim DlPlro, t up: BUI McFerron (Md) de 
feated Bob Bveraman, »> and ."« ; Bob Fay (V) 
defeated Boy Bellamy, 7 ami <i : Craig Sling 

off (V) defeated <; -ge Mantsonria, 6 and 1 : 

Ken Seldel (V) defeated Kill Blggens, 5 and 
:{ ; Tom Mm fee (V) defeated Sum Krauae, 7 
and 6, 

Maryland 9; W. Virginia 
Carl Kroneberger and Jim DiPiro 

shared medal honors, shot identical 
75's to lead Maryland to a 9-0 golf 
victory over West Virginia. 

The Terps took all the foursomes as 
Kroneberger and DiPiro won their 
matches and Bill McFerren downed 
Dan Hicks of West Virginia, 5 and 3, 
and Ray Bellamy defeated Bob Mar- 
tin of the Mountaineers, 7 and 5. 



Terpolosophy 




A European says the 
difference between 
a rich American and a 
poor one is that the 
latter washes his own 
Cadillac . . . What's 
wrong with the coun- 
try is that we're try- 
ing to run it with only 
one VP . . . Wise guy 
tells us that while traveling in Africa 
he spotted a leopard . . . Who's he kid- 
ding? . . . They come that way . . . 
tew mechanics can fix a woman's 
fender so the husband will never know 
she bent it but most of them can fix 
it so she can ask him, how come HE 
bent it ... A good way to relieve the 
monotony of any job is to think up 
ways of improving it . . . Imagination 
compensates a man for what he is not 
and a sense of humor consoles him for 
what he is . . . Only daughter just 
married . . . Parents lost a daughter 
but gained a son, a bathroom, a porch 
swing, an automobile and a telephone 
. . . Navy friend of ours has a new 
baby . . . Afraid to have it christened. 
"I don't want to see that tiny little 
thing hit across the bow with, a bottle 
of champagne." 



I NSURED SAVINGS Earn Liberal Dividends 

Citizens Bldg. & Loan 

PERSHING & FENT0N SILVER SPRING, MD. 



SAtES 



c/mt 



Sf-RVi' i 



PALMER FORD, INC. 

3110 Hamilton 
HYATTSVILLE. MD 
Phono WAif.old 7-0900 



WEBBS 

TOY AND NOVELTY SHOP 

We carry a complete line ol Party Eavors 

TOYS - GAMES - TRICKS 

GIFTS AND NOVELTIIS 

GREETING CARDS 

For All Occasions 

Page and Shaw Candy 

Open Evenings 

5221 BALTIMORE AVE. 

Hyattsville, Md. Phone WA. 7-0537 



24 -HR. TOWING SERVICE 
REPAIRS • TUNE-UP 



Day Phone 
WArfield 7-9710 

Night Phone 
UNion 4-0868 



7505 BALTIMORE 
AVENUE 
COLLEGE PARK 
MARYLAND 



Complete Insurance 
Service 

• casualty 

• surety 

• marine 

• fire 

SflUIYER- HESSinGER 

RGencY, inc. 

1005 Bonlfanl St. Sliver Spring, Md. 

JUnlper 9-4544 



DEL HAVEN WHITE HOUSE COTTAGES 

COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 
Baltimore-Washington Boulevard 

Two Miles North — University Maryland 
Hot Water Heated 50 Brick Cottage* 

Tile Baths 
F. M. IBWIN, Prop. WEbater 5-4852 



USE THE COUPON ON THE 
LAST HACK 



"Maryland" 



73 



THREE CHEERS 

To all our friends at old MU 
Ere once you were a Terrapin ; 
Threr lusty cheers : but long 

and true, 
Tomorrow you are a civilian. 

So good luck to all of you, 
In the life you now begin, 
And from time to time may 

you 
Stop off a1 Olney Inn. 

Olney inn 

Luncheons & Dinners 12-9 Daily 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

OPEN SUNDAYS, TOO 

Wedding Receptions 
Parties and Meetings 

CLOSED MONDAYS 

Phone : 
LOckwood 5-0799 

ON STATE ROUTE No. 97 
OLNEY, MARYLAND 



1954 TRACK 

Head Coach — James Kehoe 




A Sign 

In Silver Spring 

This sign marks the 
location of the best 
in banking service. 

Drive-In Banking 

Service 

JU. 9--9000 



SILVER 

SPRING 



rrr 

8701 Georgia Ave. Silver Spring 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 




fse 

POTATO CHIPS 



JUniper 5-8115 
10753 Colesville Road Silver Spring, Md. 





Apr. 10 


Quantico Marines 


• 17 


West Virginia 


24 


Penn Relays 


27 


lu'.A.A.U. 


•i/«i/ 1 


Maryland Field l>au 


4 


Georgetown 


* 8 


Navy 




'Home games at College Park 

Conference Champs 

aryland's middle dist- 
ance-loaded track team 
won a resounding vic- 
tory in the Atlantic 
Coast Conference in- 
door games with 55% 
points. 

Defending champion North Carolina 
was second with 33%, Duke third, 32, 
and Virginia fourth, 30. 

Coach Jim Kehoe's men took six 
first-places including a record in the 
pole vault, a victory in the Weil Mile, 
and a clean sweep in the 440-yard dash. 

The Terps started slow because of 
weakness in the dashes, but their mid- 
dle distance runners piled up an al- 
most unbeatable lead. 

Joe Helmer led three teammates by 
a stride in the 440, turning in a 51.9 
performance, followed by Jim Pentzer, 
Burke Wilson, and Phil Stroup. 

In the mile, Faass passed North Car- 
olina's Bobby Barden with a lap-and- 
a-quarter to go, winning by a good two 
strides in 4:23.9. 

Maryland's Mel Schwarz set a new 
conference record in the pole vault 
with a 13-feet 3% -inch jump to better 
Bob House of North Carolina's record 
of 13-1%. 

FINAL STANDINGS 

Conference Division — Maryland 55% ; N. 
Carolina 33%; Duke 32; Virginia 5; South 
Carolina 4% ; Clenison % ; N. C. State 0. 

Nonconference — VMI 28; Navy 27% ; Flor 
Ida 16 ; Georgia Tech 14 ; VPI 11 ; Georgia 
10 ; W&L 2% ; Wm. and Mary 1. 

Scholastic Division — Washington-Lee 11 ; 
George Washington 10 ; Granby of Norfolk, 
Va. 8-3/5 ; Woodroow Wilson of Portsmouth, 
Va. 7-3/5 ; Waynesboro, Va. 5 ; Hillsboro, 
N. C. 5 ; St. Christophers, Richmond, Va. 5. 

Freshman — North Carolina 16 ; Maryland 
14; Florida State 13%; Duke 9%; Presby- 
terian 5. 

CONFERENCE DIVISION 

Conference One-Mile Run — 1, Faass, Mary- 
land ; 2, Barden, North Carolina ; 3, Gold- 
stein, Maryland ; 4, Reece, Duke. 423 :9. 

Conference 60-Yard Dash — 1, Newton, N. 
Carolina ; 2, Brown, N. Carolina ; 3, Abdalla, 
Maryland ; 3, Stroup, Maryland. :06.3. 

Conference High Jump — 1, S'hankle, Duke ; 
Qulllen, Virginia (tie) ; 3, Haire, N. Carolina, 
Martin, South Carolina, Poetzman, Maryland, 
Mitchell, Clemson (tie), 6 feet, 1 inch. 

Conference Shot Put — 1, Lawshe, Duke ; 2, 
Morris, North Carolina ; 3, Dyson, Maryland ; 
4, Kistler, Duke; 51 feet, 3% Inches (new 
record). 

Conference Broad Jump — 1, Shankle, Duke ; 
2, Yarborough, North Carolina ; 3, Stroup, 
Maryland ; 4, Jones, Maryland ; 5, Wilson, N. 
Carolina, 23 feet, 5% inches. 

Conference 70- Yard Low Hurdles — 1, Shan- 
kle, Duke ; 2, Brown, N. Carolina ; 3, Scott, 
N. Carolina ; 4, Duke, N. Carolina. Time, 7.7 
seconds. 

Conference Pole Vault — 1, Schwarz, Mary- 
land, 13 feet, 3% inches, new record; 2, 
Shankle, Duke, 12, 11% ; 3, three-way tie be- 
tween Yarborough of N. Carolina, Duke of 
\ I arolina ; Brasfield of Virginia, 12.5. (Old 
record, House, N. Carolina, 13, 1%). 

< '(inference One-Mile Relay — 1, Maryland 
(Hemler, Stroup, Wilson, Pentzer) ; 2, Duke; 
.'i, North Carolina ; 4, S'outh Carolina. Time, 
J :28.2. 

Conference 440- Yard Run — 1, Hemler, Md. ; 




"Hi, Terpl That character, AESOP, hat 
been dead for, lo, these many years and this 
is STILL going out Are there REALLY two 
of you guysT" 



•J. Pentzer, Md. ; 3, Wilson, Md. ; 4 Stroup, 
.Md. Time, 51.9 seconds. 

Conference 70- Yard High Hurdles — 1, Shan- 
kle, Duke ; 2, Rubach, Maryland ; 3, Scott, 
N. Carolina ; 4, Gaddy, Maryland. Time, 8.6 
seconds. 

('(inference Two-Mile Run — 1, Good, Mary- 
land ; 2, McBride, South Carolina ; 3, Barden, 
N. Carolina ; 4, McGee, Maryland. Time, 
9 :46.8. 

Conference 880- Yard Run — 1, Waggoner, 
Maryland ; 2, Faass, Maryland ; 3, Newman, 
North Carolina; 4, Hodzlsyn, Maryland. Time, 
1 :59.9. 

FRESHMAN DIVISION 
Freshman High Jump — 1, Hogan, Mary- 
land ; 2, Seed, Roanoke ; 3, Carney, Duke, 
Brown, Florida State (Tie), 6 feet, 1 inch. 

Freshman % Mile Run — 1, Grimm, Mary- 
land ; 2, Beatty, N. Carolina ; 3, Party, Mary- 
land ; 4, Hountha, Florida State. 3 :08.9 (new 
record — old record by Jones, N. C. State, 
3:09.7). 

In The Garden 

Maryland, in the New A. C.'s Madi- 
son Square Garden track and field meet, 
placed second in the college mile relay, 
won by Adelphi College in 3 minutes, 
26.5 seconds. Providence was third and 
Iona fourth. 

Ben Good, Maryland, with a 65-yard 
handicap, won the two-mile handicap 
run in 9 minutes, 53.1 seconds. He was 
trailed by Donald Townsend, of St. 
John's (Brooklyn). 

Win In Florida 

Maryland's mile relay team won that 
event in the Florida Relays in 3:23.7 
with Alabama and South Carolina in a 
dead heat for second. The Terps fin- 
ished second in the distance medley 
relay, behind Florida. The Terps' 
winning relay team was made up of 
Hemmler, Messersmith, Wilson and 
Stroup. 

Maryland 72; Marines 59 

Maryland's Phil Stroup was a triple 
winner as Jim Kehoe's Terp track team 
opened its season by defeating the 
Quantico Marines, 72-59. 

Stroup took the 100-yard dash in 
10.5 seconds, the 220 in 23.9 seconds 
and the broad jump with 21 faet, 6% 
inches. 

Skip Gaddy won two events for the 
Terps, the high hurdles in 16.5 sec- 
onds and the low timbers in 26 seconds. 
He also finished third in the high 
jump. 

Quantico had one double winner in 
Carl Joyce, former Georgetown star, 
who came home first in the 880 in 
1:39.8 and took the mile in 4:27.8. 

The tightest race was the 440 in 
which Joe Hemler of Maryland won by 
half a step over Tom Vorhees of 
Quantico, another former Georgetown 
runner. 



74 



"Maryland" 



THE 

M. J. GROVE 
LIME CO. 

* Established 1859 * 

Crushed Stone - Limestone 

Industrial & Agricultural lime 

Concrete & Cinder Block 

Cement - Sand - Pipe 

Transit Mixed Concrete 

Free State Masonry Mortar 

Street, Road, Bridge Construction 



PIANTS 

Stephen City, Va. 

Middletown, Va. 

Frederick, Md. 

Lime Kiln, Md. 



General Offices 

Lime Kiln 
Frederick Co., Md. 

PHONES 
Monument 3-3104 
Buckeystown 3511 



T. EDCIE RUSSELL 



General Contractor 



FREDERICK, MARYLAND 



NICODEMUS 
ICE CREAM 

Phone Monument 3-4151 
FREDERICK, MD. 



Frederick Underwriters 

Incorporated 

General Insurance Agents 

EVERY KIND OF INSURANCE 
110 W. Patrick St. Frederick, Md. 



Crown Oil & Wax Co. 

Distributors 

Shell Petroleum Products 

Phone MONUMENT 3-6381 

FREDERICK, MD. 



The Marines had previously defeated 
University of Virginia. 

Kin lard i»;isii Won by Btroupe, Maxj 
land ; second, Schatsle, Qaantleo ; third, 
.lours, Maryland, Time, 10.5b. 

220-Yard Dash -Wciii by Btroupe, Mary- 
land; second, Schatsle, Quantico; third, 
FJemler, Maryland. Time, 23.9s. 

440-Yard Hun Wiui by FJemler, Maryland; 

s ml, Voorbees, Quantico; third, Wilson, 

Maryland. Ti , 51,2s. 

B80-Yard Run Won (■> i. Joyce, Quantico; 
second, Faass, Maryland; third, Wagner, 
Maryland, Time, 1m. 59.8b. 

Mill' Kun Won liy .Joyce, Quantico i S6C 

oini. Paass, Maryland; third, Horsley, Mary- 
land. Time, 4m. 27.8s, 

Two-Mile Run Won by Qracia, Quantico; 
second, Goode, Maryland : third, McGee, Mary- 
land. Time, 9m, .Mis 

120-Yard iii^ii Hurdles Won by Oaddy, 
Maryland; second, Lelneke, Quantico; third, 
Brown, Quantico. 'rime. 16.5s. 

220- Yard Low Hurdles Won by Oaddy, 
Maryland : second, Lelneke, Quantico ; third, 
Brown, Maryland, 'rime, 26s. 

High .lump Won by Newlan, Quantico; 
second, Jones, Quantico; third, Gaddy, Mary- 
land. Height, . r ) ft. 8 In. 

Broad .lump Won by Btroupe, Maryland; 
st'coini. Messersmltb, Maryland : third, Jones, 
Maryland. Distance, 21 ft. % in. 

Pole Vault Won by Schwartz, Maryland; 

second. Wlllard. Maryland: third, Braslleld, 
Quantico. Height, 12 ft. 5 in. 

Shottput — Won by Dyson. Maryland ; sec- 
ond, Boener. Quantico : third, O'Connell, 
Quanttico. Distance, 44 ft. 10% In. 

Discus — Won by Dyson. Maryland; second, 
Gemos, Quantico; third. O'Connell, Quantloo. 
Distance, 12!) ft. 4% in. 

Javelin — Won by Peterson, Quantico : sec- 
ond. Brown, Maryland ; third, Kicks, Mary- 
land. Distance, 188 ft. 

Mile Relay — Won by Quantico8 (Chambers, 
Allen, Voorhees, Joyce). Time, 3m. 27.8s. 

Maryland 108; W. Virginia 23 

As a feature to the "M" club's tri- 
sports day Maryland swamped West 
Virginia, 108-23, taking first, second 
and third places in five events. 

Mel Schwarz soared to a new Mary- 
land pole vault record of 13 ft. 1 inch, 
topping the 12-10 set in 1938 by Dart- 
mouth's Bill Bailey. 

Top man for Maryland was Phil 
Stroup, who won the 100-yard dash, the 
220 and the broadjump, as well as run- 
ning on Maryland's winning mile re- 
lay team. Larry Faass took the mile 
and two-mile runs for Maryland. 

College Park — 100 yards — 1 Phil Stroup, 
Maryland, 10-1 ; 2 Abdalla, Maryland ; 3 Bore- 
man, West Virginia. 

220 yards — 1 Stroup, 25.5 ; 2 Pentzer, 
Maryland ; 3 Wilson, Maryland. 

440 yards — 1 Pentzer, Maryland, 49.5 : 2 
Hemler, Maryland ; 3 Potter, West Virginia. 

880 yards — 1 Charles Waggner, Maryland, 

1 :59.9 ; 2 Hower, Maryland ; 3 Horsley, Mary- 
land. 

Mile — 1 Larry Paass, Maryland, 4 :25.9 ; 

2 Goldstein, Maryland ; 3 Goode, Maryland. 
Land miles — 1 Faass, Maryland, 9 :54 ; 2 

Goode, Maryland ; 3 McGee, Maryland. 

120 yard high hurdles — 1 Skip Gaddv, 
Maryland, 15.3 ; 2 Brady, West Virginia ; 3 
Van Sigworth, Maryland. 

220 yard low hurdles — 1 Gaddy, Maryland, 
25 seconds ; 2 Van Sigworth, Maryland ; 3 
Brady, West Virginia. 

High jump — 1 Pete White, West Virginia, 
5 ft. 10 inches ; 2 Poetzman, Maryland ; 3 
Gaddy, Maryland. 

Broad jump — 1 Stroup, Maryland, 21 ft. 
11% inches; 2 Messersmith, Maryland; 2 
Spinks, West Virginia. 

Pole vault — 1 Mel Schwarz, Maryland, 13 
ft. 1 inch ; 2 Willard, Maryland ; 3 Prancq, 
Maryland. 

Shot put : 1 Gene Dyson, Maryland, 4C 
ft. 4% inches; 2 Starkey, West Virginia; 3 
Grove, Maryland. 

Discus — 1 Ralph Starkey, West Virginia, 
143 ft. 3 inches ; 2 Dyson, Maryland ; 3 
Schwarz, Maryland. 

Javelin — 1 Ed Brown, Maryland, 174 ft. 9 
inches ; 2 LaFollette, West Virginia ; 3 Ross, 
Maryland. 

Mile relay — 1 Maryland (Joe Hemler, Phil 
Stroup, Burke Wilson and Jim Pentzer) 3 :26. 



FARMERS COOPERATIVE 
ASSOCIATION, INC. 

Maryland's largest locally Owned 



| and Operated 


Cooperative 




FEEDS 






| SEEDS 






FERTILIZER 






LIMESTONE 






I PETROLEUM 


PRODUCTS 




Feed M0 3 

FREDERICK Pe(roleum M0 , 


3113 
5472 


THURMONT 3111 


MIDDLETOWN 6 



Main Office: 



35 E. SOUTH ST. 
FREDERICK, MD. 




Dietrich & Gambrill, Inc. 

Frederick, Md. 

A Maryland Institution 



ANTIQUES bought and sold 

MRS. H. A. PICKERING 

URBANA, MD. 

formerly 5201 Wisconsin Ave., Washington 

Phone: Buckeyesiown 4223 

OPEN EVENINGS £ SUNDAYS 

Route 240 — 6 miles South of Frederick 



The success of your future 


and your 


interests is de- 


pendent on the American 


Way of life and our free 


enterprise 


system 


What are 


you doing about 


preserving 


these cherished 


rights of 


every American? 







James K. Ulolford 

L consulting mechanical 



2210 MARYLAND AVENUE 

BALTIMORE 18, MD. 

BEImont 5-3640 



In Oriole Parade 

The University's red and white stu- 
dent band, including the majorettes, 
took part in the Baltimore (American 
League) Orioles' baseball opening <ia> 
on 15 April. 

USE THE (XHTON ON THE 
LAST PAGE 



Maryland" 



76 



next to 
a new car a 

chernerized 

car is best 




CHERNER 



MOTOR CO. — FORD DEALERS 

18th & Florida Ave., N.W., Wash., D. C. 
HObart 2-5000 



Shirlington 

MOTOR CO. — LINCOLN-MERCURY 
DEALERS 

Shirlington Business Center 

Arlington, Virginia 
Overlook 3-4000 



R. | 
ROBINSON 



INC. 


owned and 

operated by 

Joseph H. Deckman 

Class of '31 


FREE 
PARKING 

• 

FREE 
DELIVERY 


builder's supplies 

housewares 

appliances 

hardware 

feed 



2301 PENNA. AVE., N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

LUdlow 4-1400 

- LUESTLUflY— 

uEiiDinG compnnv 

urvinq Ins lAniveriilu of /r/artj'ancl 



VENDING MACHINES 
INSTALLED AT NO COST 

TOP COMMISSIONS 
PAID 



CIGARETTE 

CIGAR 

GUM 

CANDY 

COOKIES 

ICE CREAM 

COFFEE 



416 EYE ST., N.W., WASHINGTON, D. C. 
REpublic 7-4943 



Thomas Honored 

Maryland was represented by an 
official delegation when friends of 
Lewis W. (Knocky) Thomas honored 
him with a testimonial dinner at the 
Touchdown club. 

i "lonel Geary Eppley, dean of men 
a! Maryland; William H. (Bill) Hottel, 
long identified with 
the school, Bill 
Cobey, graduate 
manager of ath- 
letics and Dr. Jack 
Faber, lacrosse 
coach, were at the 
head table in recog- 
nition of Thomaw, 
one of Maryland's 
greatest all-around 
athletes. 

Thomas was one 
of Maryland's finest 
"Knochp" in 28 halfbacks from 

1924 thru 1928 altho weighing a mere 
147 pounds, and was a member of 
the crack mile relay team coached 
by Eppley. He entered the army in 
1942 as a captain in communications 
and was discharged in 1946 with 
the rank of lieutenant-colonel. 

The main speeches eulogizing 
Knocky were made by Bob Simmons, 
a past president of the Touchdown 
Club, and Chief Judge Len Walsh of 
the Municipal Court for the District 
of Columbia. 

Among the other prominent sports 
personalities on hand to honor Knocky, 
the seventh president of the club and 
later its general manager, were Joe 
Lynch, Max Farrington, Bingo Flynn, 
Dutch Bergman and Ray Krouse. 

"Knocky" was given a standing ova- 
tion when introduced by Simmons. 

"My greatest desire is to continue 
to participate in advancing the Boys' 
club and youth activities in this area 
so long as I live," he said. 

1954 BASEBALL 

Head Coach — H. Burton Shipley 



Apr. 1 Georgetown 

3 V.P.I. 

5 Delaware 

6 William & Mary 

7 Dartmouth 

9 North Carolina State 

10 Richmond 

16 North Carolina State 

1 7 Wake Forest 

19 Duke 

20 North Carolina 
22 V. M. I. 

2:? Washington & T.ee 

24 V. P. I. 

* 26 Richmond 

27 William & Mary 

* 29 Oeorgc Washington 

* 30 Wake Fore.it 
*Muy 1 Washington & Lee 

3 George Washington 

B Johns Hopkins 

* (• Virginia 

* 7 Duke 

* 8 Clem son (Double Header) 

* 10 North Carolina 

11 Georgetown 
13 Navy 

* 14-15 South Carolina 



'Home games at College Park 

Maryland 5; V.P.I. 3 

rand's baseball team, 
again mentored by the 
Terps' Dean of Coaches 
Burt Shipley, opened 
the season with a 5-3 
win over Virginia Tech 
in Maryland's new $40,- 
000 baseball stadium. 





i 'urn h Shipley 



76 



Bill Walker batted in two runs with 

a single in the eighth inning and later 

scored to cinch the 

triumph and break 

a 2-2 tie. 

Connie Hemphill 
went the route for 
Maryland, allowing 
four hits. Only one 
earned run was 
charged to him, he 
struck out six. 

Ernie Berliner 
and Chet Hanulak 
walked to open the 
eighth and, after 
Bernie F a 1 o n e y 
struck out, Tom Baden was walked in- 
tentionally. 

Walker came through with a single 
over the leftfielder's head which 
scored Berliner and Hanulak but Bad- 
en was caught in a rundown between 
second and third which forced Walker 
to hold first. 

Walker was singled to third by Jack 
Morgan and scored on a passed ball. 

Maryland 12; Delaware 1 

Bernie Faloney, Tom Baden and 
Eddie Miller ganged up on Delaware 
to give Maryland, 12-1. 

Faloney gave no indications that his 
"Orange Bowl Knee" would be a handi- 
cap this season in baseball. He got 
three hits in four times at bat and 
stole a base. The big belters were 
Baden and Miller, each of whom hit 
a home run and drove in four runs 
apiece. Bob Weiss and Russ Duffy com- 
bined talents to hold the visitors to 
four hits. 

Maryland 11; W&M 5 

Maryland won its third game thump- 
ing William and Mary, 11-5. 

A triple by Bernie Faloney and a 
home run by Tom Baden sparked the 
Terps' seven-run seventh inning. 

Reliefer Connie Hemphill was cred- 
ited with the victory. 

Dartmouth 6; Maryland 5 

Dartmouth pushed across a pair of 
runs in the seventh inning to edge 
Maryland 6-to-5. 

Russell Duffy, who relieved starter 
John Bartko in the sixth, was the vic- 
tim of the uprising. 

Duffey had a 5-to-4 lead when Mans- 
field opened the seventh for Dartmouth 
with a single. Stroughton singled and 
took second when Maryland failed in 
an attempt to cut down Mansfield at 
third. 

Swanson knocked the third single 
that sent Mansfield and Stroughton 
home with the tying and winning runs. 

N. C. State 5; Maryland 4 

North Carolina State scored two runs 
in the seventh to beat Maryland, 5-4. 

State opened the scoring in the first 
on singles and Maryland tied it, 1-1, 
on a hit and stolen bases by Eddie 
Miller. 

The Terps went ahead, 2-1, in the 
third when Miller walked, stole sec- 

"Maryland" 



ond and scored on Hanulak's Bingle. 

State tied it up in the fifth. Mary- 
land led again with a run in the sixth, 
but State's two runs in the seventh 
and one in the ninth did the damage. 

Richmond ft; Maryland !> 
For the third straight game the 
Terps lost by one run when they were 
oontzed out by Richmond, 6-5. 

Maryland outhit the Spiders, 7 to 5, 
but faulty defense coupled with wild- 
ness of Bob Weiss spilled the beans. 

****** 
SMART GAL 

Traffic Officer: "As you came around 
that curve, I said to myself, 'Forty-five 
at least.' " 

Lady: "Well you're way off. It's this 
darned hat that makes me look that 
old." 



HOW 'BOUT THE $25? 

Snorky: "I thought I was drowning 
and a hundred pictures of my life 
flashed through my mind." 

Stuffy: "Did you happen to register 
a shot of me lending you twenty-five 
bucks back in '35?" 

****** 
LONELY GUY 

A lonely man is one who buys him- 
self a necktie the day after his birth- 
day. 

****** 
WHAT SPEED? 

Snorky: "It it true that the wild 
beasts of the jungle will not harm you 
if you carry a torch?" 

Zoo Prof: "It all depends on how fast 
you carry it." 



BASKETBALL 




Wake Forest 64; Maryland 56 

aryland was eliminated 
in the semi-final round 
of the ACC tourna- 
ment, being oontzed 
out by Wake Forest, 
64-56, in a real heart- 
breaker that went into 
overtime. After leading the Deacons 
most of the distance, the Terps fell 
behind by four points with 5 minutes 
to go and pulled into a 50-50 tie at the 
end of four periods. Gen Shue missed 
the backboard on a last-second attempt 
to win it in regular time. The Millikan- 
men had held the ball for 1 minute 
and 24 seconds waiting for that shot 
by Shue who didn't have one of his bet- 
ter nights despite a 25-point job. He 
connected on only seven of 21 tries. 
Wake Forest held a 49-44 lead in 
the fourth period when the Terps sud- 
denly came to life. Shue hit on a free 
throw and then flipped in a set. Terp 
Bob Kessler popped in a goal. Ralph 
Greco was fouled and made good for 
a 50-50 tie. 

The Deacons then started waging a 
holding game, waiting to try a last- 
second shot. Young and Shue broke 



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that up. The same strategy for Mary- 
land ended when Shue missed the back- 
board. 

The Terps struck out in the overtime 
being blanked from the floor. All six 
of their points were on free throws, 
while Wake Forest players who had 
been missing free throws all evening 
began to sink them with clock-like pre- 
cision (12 of 13). 

Maryland 75; Clemson 59 

Maryland encountered very little 
trouble in the ACC tourney's opener, 
coasting to a win over Clemson, 75-59. 

The Terps, led by Gene Shue's 28 
point assault, moved to an 18-12 first 
period lead and were ahead 38-25 when 
the first half ended. They outscored 
Clemson in every period, but the last in 
against Maryland's 15, coach Bud Milli- 
which the Tigers rolled up 20 points 
kan had his second team in there. 

Maryland tried 62 shots from the 
floor and made good 26 of them for 42 
per cent. Clemson tried 55 floor goals 
and made 20 of them for a 36.4 aver- 
age. Gene Shue accumulated 26 points. 

N. C. State A.C.C. Champs 

Wake Forest was downed, 82-80, 
overtime, in the ACC title finals at 
Raleigh by North Carolina State, and 
NCS then moved over to NCAA com- 
petition at Durham to knock off George 
Washington, newly crowned Southern 
Conference champs, 75-73. 

Shue, Hemric Tops 
Maryland's Gene Shue and Wake 
Forest's Dick Hemric tied for top 
honors on the all-tournament team of 
the Atlantic Coast Sports Writers 
Association. 

Hemric and Shue each received 42 
of 43 votes for first place. Hemric 
was named the tournament's outstand- 
ing player. Each got one second. On 
a 5-3 point basis, they tied at 213 
points. 

FIRST TEAM— Hemric. Wake Forest (213 
points) ; Shue, Maryland (213) ; Ronnie Shav- 
lik, N. C. State (191) ; Skippy Winstead, 
North Carolina (141). 

SECOND TEAM — Buzz Wilkinson, Virginia 
(120) ; Bernle Janicki, Duke (101) ; Rudy 
D'Emllio, Duke (101) ; Lefty Davis, Wake 
Forest (61). 

Shue Makes All-ACC 

Gene Shue, Maryland's all-time great 
forward and captain, who rewrote the 
Terp scoring record books in his three 
year varsity career, was named to both 
the Associated Press and Southern 
Sports Writers association All-Atlantic 
Coast conference quintets. 

Both first teams were identical, with 
Wake Forest's Dick Hemric, N. C. 
State's Mel Thompson, Duke's Rudy 
D'Emilio and Virginia's Buzzy Wilkin- 
son rounding out the squad. 

Hemric received 200 votes in the 
SSWA poll, while Shue compiled 190. 
Honors For Shue 

Gene Shue was chosen for two all- 
star teams, the first Maryland basket- 
ball player ever selected for post- 
season all-star play. 

The Terp star was picked for the 
East team against the West in the 
annual Shrine game in Kansas City. 

He was also selected to play with 
the College All-Americans against the 
Harlem Globetrotters for one-half of 
the annual cross-country tour starting 




78 



WINS HIGH RATINGS 
Gene Shue, Maryland's great court star. 

in Madison Square Garden and includ- 
ing Toronto, Buffalo, Raleigh, Her- 
shey, Pa., Philadelphia, Chicago, Fort 
Wayne and Indianapolis. 

AP Ratings 

Maryland finished the season rated 
twentieth in the AP ratings, third in 
shooting accuracy and sixth in team 
defense. In Gene Shue, the Terps had 
the seventh best individual shooter. 

FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE 

FGA FG Pet. 

1. Joe Holup. GW 313 179 57.2 

2. Karver, GW 221 124 56.1 

3. Mattick, Olka. A&M 358 199 55.6 

4. Hoxie, Niagara 210 115 54.7 

5. Spoelstra, W. Ky 381 202 53.0 

(>. Carpenter, Tex. Tech 214 110 51.4 

7. SHUE, .MARYLAND 432 221 51.2 

8. Hemric. Wake Forest 446 225 50.4 

9. Heim, Xavier (Ohio) 227 139 50.2 

10. Schlundt, Indiana 354 177 50.0 

TEAM DEFENSE 

(W-L) Pts. Ave. 

1. Okla. A&M (24-5) 1539 53.1 

2. Duquesne (26-3) 1551 53.5 

S. Wyoming (19-9) 1522 54.1 

4. Oregon State (19-10) 1585 54.7 

5. Oklahoma City (18-7) 1370 54.8 

(>. MARYLAND (23-7) 1672 55.7 

?. Washington State (10-17) 1542 57.1 

FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE 

Att. F.G. Pet. 

1. George Washington 1632 744 45.6 

2. Holy Cross 2018 871 43.2 

8. MARYLAND ir>64 669 42.8 

4. Niagara 1832 778 42.5 

5. Fumian 2370 990 41.8 

Maryland 76; W. & L. 43 

Maryland breezed past Washington 
and Lee, 76-43 as the Terps' All 
America candidate, Gene Shue scored 
26 points to set a new regular season 
scoring record for a Maryland player. 
Shue's 26 points gave him a total of 
452 points for the season. The old 
record was 435 set by Shue last year. 

The Terps also set a new mark for 
most wins in one regular season. It 
was Maryland's eighteenth win in 22 
starts and bettered the old mark of 
117 set by the Maryland teams of 1929 
and 1951. 

A 24-year-old mark was also tied. 
The most wins by a Maryland team in 
a year including post-season contests 
is 18, set by the 1930 team. That was 
the last Maryland team to win a league 
basketball title. 

Maryland was ahead, 11-1, before 
W&L scored a field goal. 

At the quarter, Maryland was in 

"Maryland" 



front, 17-9. 

With the Terp reserves playing the 
closing: minutes, Maryland had a com- 
fortable 40-20 lead at the half and 
continued to widen the margin until the 
final buzzer. 

Maryland SI; Navy l>0 

Maryland won over Navy, 61 to <>n, a 
thrill a minute see-saw court battle, 
had 'em sitting on chair edges, coast 
to coast, on a national TV presenta- 
tion while, at Annapolis, the "SRO" 
sign was up early. 

The Midshipmeni were hot as Roman 
candles on Independence Day while the 
Trips were below their season's shoot 
ing average. That made it anybody's 
ball game with the big bang saved 
for the last few seconds of action, 
when Navy was leading, 60-59, the 
Tars were freezing the ball when Terp 
Tom Young intercepted a pass with 28 
seconds to go. Young dashed down- 
court with Doral Sandlin of the Mid- 
ries in pursuit. They tangled near the 
sidelines, and Referee Jocko Collins 
called a jump ball. 

Maryland called time out before the 
jump. A second later, after Young 
won the jump and tapped the ball to 
Shue, the Terps called time out again, 
setting up the strategy. 

The Millikanmen worked the ball 
around, playing for one open shot. Shue 
finally took it and missed. The sec- 
onds were speeding away as both 
squads scrapped under the basket, Bob 
Kessler missing two rebounds in the 
melee. 

Shue then got both hands on the 
ball and standing right under the 
basket, jumped and rammed the ball 
through the cords, drawing a foul On 
the play. The clock showed one sec- 
ond remaining and that was the ball 
game. Shue missed the point, pur- 
posely some said, and Navy had time 
to lob the ball downcourt as the gun 
sounded. 

Maryland students poured out of the 
stands, hoisted Shue on their should- 
ers, and paraded around the court. 
Gene had 23 points for the day de- 
spite some excellent defensive work 
by Navv, and unquestionably was the 
outstanding player on the floor. 

Maryland 74; Wake Forest 53 

Gene Shue, Maryland's captain, 
scored 29 points and Center Bob 
Everett turned in a great performance 
of guarding high-scoring Dickie Hem- 
ric as the Terps whipped Wake Forest, 
74-53. 

A roaring crowd of 4100 watched 
Maryland have one of its hottest shoot- 
ing nights of the season in avenging 
two straight losses to Wake Forest. 

Shue hit on eight of his first nine 
tries and finished the evening with an 
amazing 13 out of 19 attempts. That's 
a terrific 68.4 percent. 

Everett limited the Deacon's Hemric 
to five points after three periods. 

Shue directed the Terps to a 40-21 
half time lead. 

Wake Forest knocked the Terps from 
the running in last year's Southern 
Conference play-offs with a last-second 
61-59 victory. It was Maryland's first 
win over the Deacons. 



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"Maryland? 



79 



Duke 68; Maryland 61 

A nine-game winning streak for 
Maryland was snapped when the Terps 
were set baek by Duke, 68-61. 

The Terps were playing their third 
rugged game in four days, i.e., Navy, 
Wake Forest, and Duke. 

Gene Shue again was the scoring 
leader. He rammed home 25 points 
despite the fact he wasn't having a 
good night. 

Shue, who generally hits on better 
than 50 percent of his tries from the 
floor was able to connect on only 6 
of 13. 

Both teams successfully jammed up 
the center lane and both resorted to 
shooting from the outside. 

Evidence of the closeness of the 
game is seen from two angles: the lead 
changed hands 16 times; the score was 
tied on 18 occasions. 

The setback knocked Maryland out 



of the lead in the Atlantic Coast Con- 
ference with Duke taking over. 
Maryland 53; Georgetown 50 

Maryland came from behind in the 
last two minutes and 25 seconds to 
take Georgetown, 53-50, before a crowd 
of 3,800. 

Bud Millikan's lads led only twice in 
the 40-minutes of play — once at 3:21 
of the third period and again in the 
waning moments of the game when 
Gene Shue, Maryland's great All- 
America candidate, pushed his team 
ahead with a set-shot from the edge of 
the charity mark. 

Shu shot 26 points thru the Hoya 
hoops to take high point honors. Flip- 
ping in six of his 16 attempts from 
the floor, Shue added 14 for 15 at the 
foul line. 

Tom Young hit with a tough lay-up 
to make the count 47-49 and then stole 



"OH, DAWGUNIT! 
I COULD HAVE 
BEEN READING 



ALL THESE 
MONTHS! 




"HE JUST 
MISSED THE 
, BUS, THASSALLI't c^jp 

WHAT GOES ON AT OUR ALMA MATER? 

WHAT OF OUR CLASSMATES? WHAT'S THE ALUMNI 
NEWS? THE SPORTS NEWS? 

The Alumnus above made the mistake of not subscribing to "Maryland." 

If YOU are like the fellow pictured above, tear out this ad and coupon 
and send it in. You can use the coupon for renewals too. Make your overall 
alumni contribution with $3.00 of it going for "Maryland" magazine. 

Please pass this message along to non-subscribers 



CUT IT OUT NOW!" 




■MM 



v.v SECRETARY, ALUMNI ASSOCT/TTION, 

$•$ UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

Enclosed herewith is $ ,my contribution to the 

Alumni Fund. $3.00 of this amount is for a subscription to "MARYLAND" 
for one year. 



the ball and rushed back to make it 
49-all with a short shot from just out- 
side the foul-toss line. It was then that 
Shue hit with the outside shot that 
locked up the Terp victory. 
George Washington 70; Maryland 57 

It was revenge for George Washing- 
ton when they defeated Maryland, the 
only team that had defeated the 
Colonials this year. Final score G. W. 
70; Terps 57. 

An all-time Uline Arena record 
crowd of 7090 attended. 

The Terps made 50 percent of their 
shots. They took 42, made 21. The 
Colonials also made 50 percent, but 
they tried 48 times and made 24. 

Gene Shue played an All-America 
game, carrying his team on his shoul- 
ders. He scored 23 points but G.W. 
had too many guns in its finest game 
of the season. 

G.W. was off to an 18-0 lead in the 
first period and gradually stretched it 
out. At intermission, it was 36-25. 

G.W. opened up an 18-point lead at 
one point in the third quarter but had 
to settle for a 55-411 margin going 
into the last. Maryland's defense 
pressed a little closer and committed 
costly fouls. Shue began taking more 
shots, making most of them 

It was Maryland's 6th defeat in 22 
games. G.W. had only one defeat (by 
Maryland) against 19 wins. 

Maryland 74; W & M 55 .. 

With 2500 fans cheering him on, 
Gene Shue scored 23 points to set a 
Maryland scoring records of 601 points 
as he paced the Terps to a 73-5l> 
victory over William and Mary. 

He scored eight of the Terps' last 
12 points. 

After Shue obliged with a bucket 
for his 599th point, (he was fouled"). 
Shue sank both of the free throws 
and had his 601st point. 

Coach Bud Millikan took Shue 
out of the game with 45 seconds re- 
maining, and the Maryland fans gave 
Shue a standing ovation for the re- 
mainder of the game. 

In three years, Shue has scored 1344 
points, also a Maryland record. 

The Terps led, 22-14, at the quarter, 
38-24 at the half, and maintained their. 
14-point advantage at 53-39 going into 
the final period. 

Greco, Shue, and Ron Brooks were 
all making their final appearances for 
the Terps. 

Blackie's Team 

Maj. Eddie (Blackie) Naughten, for- 
mer University of Maryland athlete, 
has coached his Army Musketeers 
basketball team to the Hawaiian inter- 
service championship, first time an 
Army team has taken that title. 

Naughten's team had a 13-3 record 
in the nine-team league. For Naughten, 
who was a boxer, not a basketball 
player, at Maryland, it was the second 
service championship team he had 
handled. His club won the Far East 
Command basketball title in 1949. 

Naughten's Musketeers will take 
part in the All-Army tournament at 
Fort Lewis, Wash., in April. 



80 



"MaryUmt p 




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University, of ^Maryland cAlumni Publication 



"AcduijudL 

ihsL wifxLdL 

cuwunrL 




Vol. XXV 



July-August, 1954 



No. 4 



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"Pedtuati&t <U t'eACumtti/^ 



l'n hi inlied Bi-Monthly at the University of 
Maryland, and entered at the Post Office, 
College Park. Md.. as second class mail mat- 
ter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 
1879. $3.00 per year — Fifty cents the copy. 



HARVEY L. MILLER. Managing Editor 

Director of Publications and Publicity 

University of Maryland 

College Park. Mil. 



SALLY L. OGDEX. Advertising Director 

Eighteen W. Twenty-fifth St. 

Baltimore 1. Md. 

HO. 7-901S 



H. JULIET WOODFIELD, Circulation 

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ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Officers 

Dr. Albert E. Goldstein '12, President 
i HI. O. H. Saunders '10. Vice-President 
J. Homer Remsberg '18. Vice-President 
David L. Brigham '3S. Executive Secretary 

General Alumni Council 

AGRICULTURE — Lee W. Adkins '42. Abram 

Z. Gottwals '38, .1. Homer Remsberg '18. 
ARTS & SCIEXCES— William H. Press '28, 

Marjorie R. Wharton '41. C. G. Donovau 

'17. 
BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION— 

X'orman Sinclair '43. Harry A. Boswell, Jr. 

'42. Roger L. Odette '52. 
DEXTAL — Eugene L. Pessage, Jr. '40. Albert 

C. Cook '38, William E. Trail '26. 
EDUCATION'— R. Louise Sudlow '50. Stewart 

McCaw '35, Florence L. Duke '50. 
ENGINEERING — S. Chester Ward '32, C. V. 

Koons '29. Col. O. H. Saunders '10. 
HOME ECONOMICS'— Katharine A. Longride 

'29. John G. Prendergast '33. 
MEDICAL — Albert E. Goldstein '12, Thurs- 
ton R. Adams '34. William H. Triplett '11. 
PHARMACY— Frank Block '24, Frank Black 

'04. Benjamin F. Allen '37. 
NURSING — Flora Street '3S. Eva Darley '27, 

Martha Curtiss '48. 

Alumni Clubs 

BALTIMORE— Wm. H. Triplett, '11. 
CARROLL COUNTY — Sherman E. Flanagan, 

Sr. '24. 
CUMBERLAND — Dr. J. Russell Cook '23. 
EASTERN SHORE— Otis Twillv '21. 
"M" CLUB— Sam Silber, '34. 
NEW ENGLAND— R. A. B. Cook, '05. 
NEW YORK — Miss Sarah E. Morris. '24. 
PITTSBURGH— Gordon Keasler, '29. 
PRINCE GEORGE'S CO.— Egbert Tingle, '27. 
RICHMOND— Paul Mullinix. '36. 
SCHENECTADY — Mrs. Marie Esher. '45. 
TERRAPIN — James W. Stevens, '17. 

Ex-Officio 

Past President — Dr. A. I. Bell, '19. 
Past President — T. T. Speer, '17. 
University President — Dr. II. c. Bynl, '08. 
Executive Secretary — David L. Briguain, '38. 



Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Consulting Engineer 

100 W. MONUMENT STREET 
Baltimore 1, Md. 



2,045 In 1954 Graduating Class 



General O'Donnell Speaks On "What Price Peace?" 



NURSES WIN FIRST FOUR YEAR 

B.S. DEGREES. 

SOME GRADUATE IN HEIDELBERG. 

By JloAuey. I. Miilei 

//I am convinced that the moral and 
| spiritual rearmament of the 

world's people is necessary to any suc- 
cessful quest for peace. However, we 
must possess military power sufficient 
to insure an armed peace until people 
and nations of the world learn to live 
in harmony," warned Lieutenant Gen- 
eral Emiiiett O'Donnell, U.S.A.F., 
Deputy Chief of Staff, U. S. Air 
Force, in the Commencement address 
to Maryland's Class of 1954 on the 
subject "What Price Peace?" 

"At no time in our history have we 
been as deeply concerned with and 
called upon to defend, to define, and to 
live for those freedoms we so deeply 
desire for all, and in our new concern 
for those freedoms is our strength," 
he continued. 

Generosity Misjudged 

"Communists have mistaken Ameri- 
can generosity for weakness," the 
speaker said, "and I feel certain that 
they believe our civilized horror and 
fear of war with them will ultimately 
cause us to pay any price or blackmail 
to avoid it. It is high time they learn 
differently," General O'Donnell said. 

"We must defend ourselves against 
the sinister force of an atheistic world 
communism with every weapon at our 
disposal; economic, spiritual, political, 
and if necessary, military," the General 
warned. 

"I do not believe that the free world 
today is willing to pay a price involving 
loss of honor, dignity and a reason- 
able degree of safety for a peace which 
in reality is nothing but submission to 
subjugation and abjective slavery. Our 
goal is to prevent war, but not at any 
price," the speaker went on to say, 
adding, "There are still things in life 
worse than death. Fear and slavery 
are among them. Your inheritance is 
a sick and troubled world whose ulti- 
mate destiny depends upon the kind 
of doctors you turn out to be." 

"Do Nothing" Warning 

Warning the graduates against the 
national danger of drifting into "do- 
nothing atomic neurosis," the general 
likened the free world's quest for peace 
to the search for the Holy Grail as 
"more a struggle for freedom than a 
quest for peace." According to legend, 
many knights undertook the search, 
but only a few were sufficiently chaste 
in thought, word and deed to glimpse 
the chalice. 

Peace, he said, may be elusive for 
the same reason. He asked, "Could it 



he that we, although we have altruistic 

and lofty motives, have not ourselves 
proved worthy?" 

O'Donnell asked whether Americans, 

because of prolonged world strife, have 
become lazy and indifferent, compla- 
cent and fearful of reality. 

"The answer to most of these ques- 
tions is 'no'," he said. "Not an em- 
phatic 'no,' but 'no' nonetheless." 

O'Donnell, who created a stir when 
he advocated the atom-bombing of Red 
China in 1951, had words of hope, too. 
He cited the defense build-up and 
"braking action" against aggression. 

Also, he expressed the belief that 
.' mericans are beginning to look at 
themselves in the "cold light of reality" 
and undergoing a great spiritual re- 
armament. 

All Out War 

General O'Donnell said that today 
everyone is involved in war, for it is 
no longer possible for two armies to 
"clash on the field of battle and fight 
for victory for cheering thousands at 
home." 

"There will be no victors in wars of 
the future. Everyone will lose. It is 
simply a matter of degree," the Gener- 
al added. 

Speaking from personal combat ex- 
perience in which "I have seen many 
of my comrades die," General O'Don- 
nell cited the "brutal stupidity, fright- 
ful waste and horrible destruction of 
modern war" and branded it as "utterly 
useless' except when we contemplate 
what might have happened had we not 
fought!" 

"Vicious, brutal and plundering 
forces are on the loose in the world 
today. They must be brought under 
control and contained, else we perish," 
General O'Donnell said. 

Lauds Programs 

Prior to launching into the theme of 
his address General O'Donnell, in be- 
half of the Department of Defense, 
expressed high appreciation of the Uni- 
versity's Overseas Program as a pro- 
gressive, far sighted, courageous step 
toward bringing education to the men 
in uniform. 

In this the speaker particularly 
lauded Dr. H. C. Byrd, President 
Emeritus, who was on the platform but 
did not speak. 

"Maryland's great Overseas Pro- 
gram," General O'Donnell said, "is 
matched only by your excellent R.O. 
T.C. performance." 

The lingering shadow of war, under 
which college seniors have graduated 
for years, also was alluded to by Gov. 
Theodore R. McKeldin in a short ad- 
dress. 

In greeting the graduates, the Gov- 
ernor said people must not panic be- 
cause there are "difficult times" at 
every turn. 

"I am inclined to give short shrift 






i.i. (Jen. O'Dontu II 



Qbmtneticemetit ^peaJiet 

Lieutenant General Emmeti O'Don- 
nell, Jr.. I. S.A.I'., I9."> I commence 
mi'iit speaker, a command pilot. ifl l>< |> 

ut] Chief of Staff for Personnel at Air 
Force Headquarters, Washington. 
General O'Donnell gradated from the 

U. S. Military Academy in 1928, served 
first as a Lieutenant of infantry, but 

began flight train- 
ing that same year, 
being one of the 
\rmys early air 
mail pilots in 1934. 
>er\in>; at vari- 
ous air bases he led 
the first HI 7 flying 
fortresses across the 
Pacific at the out- 
break of World War 
II, his tfroup fight- 
inn in the air and 
on the ground from 
Hataan to Mindanao 
in the Philippines, eventually evacu- 
ating to Java. In the action in the 
Philippines, he won the Distingushed 
Flying Cross for leading an attack on 
enemy naval vessels. 

In 1942, he served with the 10th Air 
Force in India and in 1943 he led the 
73rd Bomb Wing to Saipan for the 
first B-29 attacks on Tokyo. 

After service in various high execu- 
tive offices, General O'Donnell, in 1950, 
took a nucleus of the 15th Air Force 
staff to Japan where he organized and 
commanded the Far East Bomber Com- 
mand in service over Korea, winning 
the Distinguished Service Cross. 

He also holds the Distinguished Serv- 
ice Medal, the Silver Star, the Dis- 
tinguished Flying Cross with three Oak 
Leaf Clusters, Legion of Merit, Air 
Medal with one Oak Leaf Cluster, and 
the Presidential Unit Citation with One 
Cluster. 



to those political morticians who see 
only gloom ahead. I greet you on this 
day, so important to you and to us as 
a free society of educated men," the 
Governor added. 

After the speeches Acting President 
Thos. B. Symons and faculty members 
got down to the main business at hand, 
that of presenting degrees and diplom- 
as. 

2,045 Graduates 

The University of Maryland's gradu- 
ates for the year ending with com- 
mencement exercises on Saturday, June 
5, 1954, totaled 2,045. 

While the main ceremonies took 
place on the spacious quadrangle at 
College Park, a few degrees had also 
been issued to service personnel gradu- 
ates at Heidelberg, Germany. 

Two B.A. degrees in the College of 
Special and Continuation Studies 
marked the first time such have been 
awarded. They represented study in 



"Maryland" 



'.v*^> 




Commencement CxerclseS 54 

ON THE UNIVERSITY'S SPACIOUS QUADRANGLE! 




.L-Jl^"" ... Co |oncl Jo«ph R "ree. Doctor of 

, ,ppcr UHi D ' ' M ,,„ ory Science. sm""^ P £. 0oo „. : ll. Doctor o1 low* 

M,, "C:- Tr-- — — t$obe . ,„e, 

i , bWM G '"" , B Symons, pr«i-"9 ""^ ' „ u honor- 

imnned.a... p. Cole. r. ( C omp.on wn.le 



general subjects at the University of 
Maryland in Europe and were also 
awarded in Germany. 

For the first time in the University's 
History, U.S. degrees covering a four 
year course were awarded in the School 
of Nursing. There were nine such, in 
addition to the 41 graduates of nursing 
under the former system of nursing 
curricula. 

In the number of graduates, the Uni- 
versity's College of Arts and Sciences 
lead with 373 graduates. 

Of the other schools located at Col- 
lege Park, the Graduate School issued 
degrees to 349; Military Science 233; 
Business and Public Administration 
229; Education 183; Engineering 106; 
Agriculture 100; Home Economics 52; 
Physical Education 35; and Special and 
Continuation Studies 2. 

Of the Baltimore professional schools, 
the School of Dentistry lead with 107 
graduates; Medicine 96; Law 86; Nurs- 
ing 50; and Pharmacy 44. 

New Lieutenants 

A dramatic ceremony, the commis- 
sioning of 167 uniformed seniors as 
second lieutenants in the Air Force 
Reserve, featured the exercises. They 
will go on duty soon. 

Seventy-six ROTC cadets, by choice 
or lack of flying qualifications, received 
certificates showing they completed the 
course. Most of these are awaiting 
appointments in the Air National 
Guard in their respective states. 

President Symons, aided by Governor 
McKeldin, Judge Wm. P. Cole, Chair- 
man of the Board of Regents. Edward 
F. Holter, of the Board of Regents, 
Dr. H. C. Byrd and Dean Gordon M. 
Cairnes, of the College of Agriculture, 
awarded five honorary degrees as fol- 
lows: 

Honorary Degrees 

DOCTOR OF LAWS:— Lillian Cleve- 
land Compton, AB, West Virginia; MA, 
Columbia, President of Frostburg State 
Teachers College and former supervisor 
of elementary schools and assistant 
superintendent of schools of Allegany 
County. Miss Compton is the second 
woman to be awarded an honorary 
doctorate by the University of Mary- 
land, the first being the late Dr. Anna 
Richardson, who received the degree 
in 1929 when she was dean of the 
College of Home Economics at the 
University of Iowa. 

DOCTOR OF LAWS:— Simon Ernest 
Sobeloff— LL.B., Maryland 1914. Solici- 
tor General of the United States, for- 
mer Chief Judge of the Maryland 
Court of Appeals. Baltimore City 
Solicitor and U. S. Attorney for the 
District of Maryland. 

DOCTOR OF AGRICULTURE:— 
George Melville Worrilow — B.S., Mary- 
land '27. Nationally known expert in 
the dairy industry and cattle judging. 
Director of Extension Service of the 
University of Delaware, first cattle 
judging team to go to England, Master 
of the Estate Grange and for many 
years a leader in Maryland and nation- 
al agricultural circles. 

DOCTOR OF MILITARY SCIENCE: 
— Lieutenant General Emmett O'Don- 
nell, Jr., USAF-USNA '28— Leader of 
the first B-29 attacks on Tokyo. Or- 



ganizer <>f tin- USAF stall' in Japan for 

action in Korea. Distinguished service 
cross, distinguished service medal, sil- 
ver star, distinguished Hying cross with 
three oak leaf clusters, air medal with 
One oak leaf cluster and presidential 
unit citation with one oak leaf cluster. 

General O'Donnell is Deputy Chief <>f 
stall' for Personnel at USAF head- 
quarters, Washington, !>.<'. 

HONORARY CERTIFICATES OF 
MERIT IN AGRICULTURE 

Mrs. Ethel 'league Feucht, Elkton, 
Md., Mrs. Feucht has been an active 
leader in home demonstration work for 
twenty-five years. 

Mr. Oscar Fay Grimes, Davidaonvile, 
Md., Mr. Grimes is a tobacco grower 
and has produced top quality tobacco 
and live stock year after year. 

Mr. Herbert R. Hoopes, Forest Hill, 
Md., Mr. Hoopes is a leading farmer 
who has been active in dairy circles. 

Mr. Albert O'Neal, Cumberland, Md., 
Mr. O'Neal is now retired from farm- 
ing, an outstanding leader and strong 
supporter of farm organization and 
extension work in Allegany County. 

The Invocation was by Reverend 
Nathaniel Acton, St. Andrew's Church, 
College Park, Maryland. 

The Benediction was by Dr. Lester 
A. Welliver, President, Theological 
Seminary, Westminster, Maryland. 

Soprano solos by Miss Lee Meredith, 
with Gleen Carow at the organ, were 
Drake's "I Believe" and "Pace Pace, 
Mio Dio," from Verdi's La Forza del 
Destino. 

Music was by the U. S. Air Force 
Band. 




GRADUATE TRIO 

// was three of <i kind in the Barnes family, 
of College I'm!,-, when father, mother and 
daughter graduated at three different levels 
nt Commencement Exercises on ■him 5. 

Jack I). Barnes, Instructor in English, rr- 
ceived n Ph.D. in English in mid to an A. It. 
awarded in 1939 nml n Waster's in 1947. 

His wife, Cecile Jones Barnes received n 
Its. degree in Childhood Education, 

Their daughter, Keith Barnes, ."> years of 
age, received n certificaU fur four years n] 
attendance in the. University's Nursery-Kin- 
dergarten, 



1/ r« ' '"" pb< /' 



-■ \. n I p 

This y« 
tin- Beventh graduati 
Stevenson famil) with an "All M .. 
land" i ecoi d. Mi Jee 
< lampbell graduated f the Col i 

of I 

■ •:' M • 

C Campbell's brotl 

ami . '■ i 
MBx awarded 'I e g - 
^H from the 
pH 
Efl i will 

enroll at Mai viand, 

making a total of 
eight for the St 

•n-. "If we in- 
cluded more di t a nt 
relatives and in- 
laws, we could make 
this a much larger list," commented 
Mrs. Campbell, "But we are listing only 
the immediate family." 

Incidentally, Mr. Stevenson has put 
all seven of his children through col- 
lege. 

Mrs. Campbell's brothers and sisters, 
previous graduates, are as follows: 
Gladys Stevenson McKenzie, 1 1 
Kc, 1945; Lottie Stevenson Adkins, Ed- 
ucation, 1943; Bernice Stevenson Clark, 
Home Ec, 1941; Marguerite Steven- 
son Vorkeper, Home Ec, 1939; Elmer 
Clark Stevenson, Agriculture, 1937; 
Frank Vernon Stevenson, Agriculture, 
1939. 

Bride-Groom Grads 

Among the bride and groom gradu- 
ates were Mr. and Mrs. William Kuly 
Price (the former Ruth Pollen Bauman). 
The bride graduated from A. & S., the 
gioom from Education. 

Virginia Dare Winner 

The recipient of this year's Virginia 
Dare Award for scholarship in Dairy 
Technology at the University of Mary- 
land was Miss Maija Vilums, who re- 
ceived her degree at the commence- 
ment exercises. She is a Dairy Tech- 
nology Major. 

Miss Vilums was born in Riga, Latvia 
in 1929 and come to the United States 
in 1949 under the displaced persons 
immigration act. Her early education 
was obtained in Latvia. However, she 
completed her high school education 
in a refugee camp 
sponsored by the 
International Refu- 
gee Organization in 
West Germany. 

In the United 
States, Miss Vilums 
fulfilled the require- 
ments of the Immi- 
gration act by em- 
ployment for a year 
as a household 
worker. The finan- 
cial return she re- 
ceived in the posi- 
tion was earmarked for her co 
education. Miss Vilums applied and 
was admited to the University of Mary- 
land in Dairy Technology in the fall 
of 1950. 

Since she had no other source of in- 
come, she had to support herself and 
finance her college education by work- 




Uiss 1 Hums 



"Maryland" 



y i 



A* 



ill 






^ 





DORMITORIES NAMED FOR COUNTIES 

Pictured shove an- the two types o\ new dormitories newring completion «( /7ic I'nirersitii 0] 
Uttniimui Three new dormitories /or men consist <;/ 16 typical iwits, icitJi capacity for 800 
students, ami three new dormitories for women, consist of !) typical units, designed to house 

famed for Varyland counties, the men's dormitories will be fcnown as Montgomery, Charles 
and Alleahanv iimis, while the women's dormitories will be designated as Caroline, Wicomico 

and en, roll Halls. . 

V'/ii upper picture, shows the men's dormitories. 1 lie women's dormitories appear tn the 
loirer illustration. 



ing as a laboratory technician for 
local dairy plants during the summer 
and selling bus tickets during the 
school year. 

Miss Vilums' grade point average for 
the last two completed semesters are 
3.64 and 3.40. Her all-college grade 
point average is 3.1. 

While attending Maryland, Miss 
Vilums, in 1951 and 1952, received the 
Teacher's Honorary Society Award, 
presented to the outstanding foreign 
student excelling in scholarship and 
student relationships. 

In 1952 and 1953, she received the 
Dairy Technology Society of Maryland, 
the District of Columbia Scholarship 
Award, for leadership, scholarship and 
interest in the Dairy Industry. 

In 1952, she was selected as a mem- 
ber of the Dairy Products Judging 
Team. In competition, she won indi- 
viduals honors in the Southern contest 
in Knoxville, Tennessee, and made an 
excellent showing in the inter-collegiate 
National judging in Detroit. 

She is a member and Secretary of 
the University's Dairy Science Club. 

Lauded In Journal 

The "Ice Cream Trade Journal" had 
this to say about Miss Vilums: — 

"At the Agricultural Convocation at 
the University of Maryland, one of the 
outstanding human interest stories ever 
to come out of the ice cream industry 
was revealed. A displaced person from 
behind the iron curtain surmounted a 
number of difficulties to win achieve- 
ment in the ice cream world." 

Miss Vilums, upon graduation, ac- 
cepted an offer to join the faculty of 
the University of Wisconsin in the 
dairy department. 



At Heidelberg 

By BRADFORD JACOBS 
(Baltimore sun) 

Residents of Heidelberg, Germany, 
recognized the strains of an ancient 
German Christmas song, "Tannenbaum, 
Tannenbaum," as they rang out over 
the equally ancient University of Heid- 
elberg. But the spirit behind it was 
pure College Park and it came out 
"Maryland, My Maryland." 

The elaborate overseas program run 
by the University of Maryland for the 
last five years had now reached the 
point of holding its first full-blown 
commencement exercises. No other 
University has reached such a goal. 

Thirty-two students, ranging from a 
full colonel to an airman first class 
won Maryland degrees held out to serv- 
icemen stationed in Europe. 

Karl Friederich, grand duke of Bad- 
en, stared down with sightless marble 
eyes as Maryland conferred bachelor 
degrees on graduates in the venerable 
"Aula" assembly hall of Alt Heidel- 
berg. 

Fifteen of the new college gradu- 
ates were members of the United 
States Army, fifteen were Air Force 
men, and the remaining two were 
American civilians with service attach- 
ments. 

When it came time to slip the black 
caps and gowns over their service uni- 
forms, only twenty of this lot were 
actually on hand at Heidelberg. The 
"campus" administered by Maryland's 
overseas program covers some 5,000,- 
000 square miles and some of the grads 
were tied down by military duties. 

One graduate would have had to 
travel from Ankara, Turkey. 

But these defections cast no shadow 



on the commencement exercises. This 
was the first formal graduation cere- 
mony the Maryland program has been 
able to put on since it got rolling. 

There were caps and gowns for the 
graduates and the faculty, an academic 
procession, invocation, piano interludes, 
conferring of degrees, potted palms 
and "Maryland, My Maryland." 

Two U. S. generals made graduation 
addresses, and Gen. William Hoge, com- 
mander in chief of the American Army 
in Europe and Maj. Gen. Robert M. 
Lee, commanding general of the 12th 
Air Force. 

There was the bust of Karl Fried- 
rich, who renovated the Aula for its 
five hundredth anniversary in 1886. 
Above him rose a huge mural depicting 
Heidelberg's real beginnings during the 
Holy Roman Empire. A plaque com- 
memorates the French sack of the uni- 
versity in 1693 and its rebuilding 29 
years later. 

Dr. Ray Ehrensberger, dean of the 
College of Special and Continuation 
Studies for the University of Maryland, 
with Dr. Augustus J. Prahl, overseas 
program director, keeps the program 
running with the assistance of some 
200 faculty members scattered through 
sixteen countries. 

Baccalaureate 
"What shall it profit a man to have 
gained a degree, to have amssed a 
fortune, to enjoy the credit of a great 
repute among men, if at the end of all, 
he is to find that he has failed in the 
greatest achievement of all, and that 
to which all others are subordinated, 
the fulfillment in his own life of his 
divinely appointed destiny?", asked the 
Very Reverend Father Edward B. Bunn, 
S.J., President of Georgetown Uni- 
versity, in his Baccalaureate address to 
the 1954 graduating class, speaking on 
the subject "Providential Emmisaries." 
"Even the last two decades have 
brought home forcibly to men the 
folly — nay, more the disaster and 
tragedy — of abandonment of a higher 
purpose in life than merely temporal 
aspiration, the circumscription of man's 
effort to the confines of the material, 
the denial or ignoring of the existence 
of a God Who governs the universe, 
and to Whom all men are individually 
accountable," Father Bunn went on to 
say. 

American Opportunity 
"It was not the intent of our Found- 
ing Fathers to create a civil society 
whose members are indifferent to re- 
ligious worship," the speaker con- 
tinued, "It was the purpose of our 
founders to destroy the barriers to re- 
ligious worship and practice by empha- 
sizing the freedom of conscience." 

"The struggle today, both internal 
and external, is against atheistic soviet 
communism," Father Bunn said. 
"America gives each of us this oppor- 
tunity to contribute to her moral 
strength in the constitutional freedoms 
we possess. These have been provided 
by Divine Providence. Hence, Ameri- 
cans, in a special sense, are Providen- 
tial Emissaries. The more education we 
have, the greater is our obligation to 
fulfill our role as His Emissaries," 
Father Bunn emphasized in his con- 
cluding remarks. 

"Maryland" 



Dr. Wilson H. Elkins Is Appointed To Presidency 

t 




MARYLAND WELCOMES NEWLY APPOINTED PRESIDENT 

The Governor of Maryland, the I niversity's Board o\ Regents, l>r. II. <'. Byrd, President Emeritus; Dr. Thos. /'. Symons, let lug President 
and tin Hoard ul Regents, greet the newly chosen President, l>r. Wilson II. Elkins. 

Pictured tieji to right are l>r. Louis I.. Kaplan, Messrs. Oharles P. McCormick, Irthur <>. Ijovejoy, and Harry II \<ttttt ; \i i • John i Whttt 
hurst. His Excellency, Governor Theodore /'. McKeldin, Mr. It. Herbert Brown, Dr. Elkins, Dr. ftymons, Judgi Wm. P. Oole, -it , Chairman, 
Board ul Regents; Mr. <'. Ewvng Tuttle, l>r. i:. I'mil Knott s, Mr. Edward S. Burke, and Dr. Byrd. 



Rhodes Scholar, Head of Texas Western, To Assume 
New Duties In September. 



Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, President of 
Texas Western College, was se- 
lected as the new President of the 
University of Maryland, it was jointly 
announced by Governor Theodore R. 
McKeldin, Judge William P. Cole, Jr., 
Chairman of the Board of Regents, and 
Maryland's acting President, Thomas 
B. Symons, at a meeting of the Board 
of Regents in Baltimore. 

Dr. Elkins, born in Medina, Texas, 
is 45 years old. A Rhodes Scholar, he 
is a Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Nu. 

Judge Cole stated that Dr. Elkins 
had been selected from a list of over 
100 candidates, including men promi- 
nent in public life, former senators and 
governors, business leaders, newspaper 
editors and men of stature in both 
large and small educational institu- 
tions. 

"We were most impressed by Dr. 
Elkin's splendid academic training," 
Judge Cole said. 

Dr. Elkins expressed appreciation for 
"the confidence that the board has 
placed in me." 

"I shall do all within my power to 
perform the required duties of presi- 
dent and more if necessary," he said. 
Formal Inauguration 

Dr. Elkins will be formally inaugu- 
rated on October 29, the same dav the 
Glenn L. Martin Institute of Tech- 
nology will be dedicated. 

The new President gained his ele- 
mentary and secondary education in 
Brackenbridge High School, San An- 
tonio. He attended Schreiner Institute, 
Kerrville, Texas, 1925-27, and the Uni- 
versity of Texas, 1928-1932, where he 
received B.A. and M.A. degrees. 

He taught at Cisco High School in 
1932-33. In 1933 he was awarded a 
Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford Univer- 
sity, where he received Bachelor of Lit- 
erature and Doctor of Philosophy de- 
grees in 1936. 

An instructor in the department of 
History at the University of Texas, 



1930-38, he next became president of 
San Angelo Junior College, 1938-1948. 
He has been president of Texas West- 
ern College, El Paso, Texas (a branch 
of the University of Texas), 1949 to 
present. 

President Elkins, a Methodist, mar- 
ried Dorothy Blackburn, a Texan, 1937. 
Two children, Carole Ann and Mar- 
garet Elise, ages 13 and 8, are very 
fond of riding horses. 

Distinguished classmates of Dr. El- 
kins' at the University of Texas in 
elude Governor Allan Shivers, Assis- 
tant Secretary cf Defense, Robert B. 
Anderson, Associate Justice of the U. 
S. Court of Customs and Patient Ap- 
peals, Eugene Worley. 

Barrage Of Questions 

At a press conference at the time of 
his selection, Dr. Elkins answered all 
questions tossed at him — from football 
to the eternal academic question of the 
humanities versus the physical sciences. 

"I certainly believe in academic free- 
dom," he declared. "But there are all 
kinds of definitions of academic free- 
dom. 

"A teacher enjoys freedom to the 
extent that he does not interfere with 
the rights of students and others. But 
if he is engaged in indoctrination he is 
interfering with the rights of stu- 
dents." 

Dr. Elkins held that teachers could 
try to indoctrinate more easily in the 
social sciences than in the physical 
sciences. 

"Academic freedom is always in dan- 
ger, just as all freedoms are in dan- 
ger," he continued. 

"The reason why we read that aca- 
demic freedom is in danger is because 
society is much more complex than 
formerly. We are dealing with more 
people and issues than in the past. 

"Anyone who is serious and thinks 
through the subject thinks academic 
freedom is more in danger than others. 




Al. DAN EGG Ml koto 

WELCOME TO MARYLAND 

/'/•. //. c. Byrd, tin- I niversity't President 
Emeritus, clasps tin hand of Dr. Wilson II. 
in, ins. in a- hi miirtiii President o) Maryland, 
us Governor Theodore I'. McKeldin smiles 
approval. 



That is because so much depends on 
the good judgment of each individual 
teacher." 

On a variety of other subjects Dr. 
Elkins expressed the following views: 

1. His new job — Essentially the same 
as at a smaller college, but there are, 
of course, more people and more prob- 
lems with which to deal. "It is an op- 
portunity to develop a larger educa- 
tional program." 

2. Collegiate sports — "I favor col- 
legiate sports. I think they have a 
place in American colleges. Sports 
should be properly regulated so there 
is no detriment to the institution or 
harm to the student." 

Blend Needed 

3. Courses of study — "A good blend 
of humanities and science is needed. 
\\ c are told that humanities are neg- 
lected and yet if you try to set up a 
general educational program as we did 
in Texas you will find you should per- 
haps give more attention to the general 
sciences than the humanities." 

4. Size of the Universitj of Mary- 
land — "I don't think the university can 
outgrow itself. How large it should be 



"Maryland" 



depends on how much and how many 
it is supposed to serve." 

5. Graduate work — "Many small 
schools are going into graduate work 
when they should concentrate on doing 
a first-class job on the undergraduate 
level. A large school like the Univer- 
sity of Maryland has an obligation, 
however, to do both undergraduate and 
graduate work, with extensive research. 
But the primary job must remain 
teaching, not research." 

"The strength of the University of 
Maryland, in the final analysis, will 
depend on the strength of its faculty," 
Dr. Elkins went on to say. 

"I am, of course, not implying that 
the present faculty at Maryland is 
weak, but only that maintaining a 
strong faculty will be one of my major 
concerns," he added. 

Education First 

"Sometimes we get too involved with 
budgeting and other aspects of admin- 
istering a college or university, when 
it is its educational program in which 
we should be primarily interested," Dr. 
Elkins said. 

"I intend to spend the first year, 
more or less, studying the setup and 
the conditions under which the univer- 
sity operates. Right now, I contem- 
plate no major changes." 

Dr. Elkins is the fourth man to hold 
the post since the present institution 
was formed in 1920 through the merger 
of the old privately owned University 
of Maryland in Baltimore and the 
Maryland State College at College 
Park. 

Dr. Elkins's predecessors were Dr. Al- 
bert F. Woods, until 1926; Dr. Ray- 
mond A. Pearson, from 1926 to 1937, 
and Dr. Byrd, from 1937 until January 
2, 1945, when Dr. Thomas B. Symons, 
former dean of agriculture, was ap- 
pointed acting president. 

Of the four presidents, only Dr. Byrd 
was a Marylander. Dr. Woods came 
from the University of Minnesota, and 
Dr. Pearson was president of Iowa 
State College prior to his Maryland 
appointment. Dr. Symons, too, is a 
native of Maryland. 

Dr. Elkins is the son of a Medina, 
Texas merchant. His family moved to 
San Antonio when he was 3 years old. 
Great Athlete 

Sometimes referred to as "the Uni- 
versity of Texas' greatest athlete," Dr. 
Elkins worked his way through school, 
won eight varsity letters in football, 
basketball and track, captained the 
basketball team, was president of the 
Students Association and received his 
bachelor and master degrees in 1932. 

He quarterbacked the 1930 Texas 
team that won the Southwestern Con- 
ference championship. He also played 
that position on the 1929 and 1931 
teams. 

In track, he was a dash man and a 
broadjumper. 

"College athletics should be properly 
controlled, or else it faces ruination. 
We have to have certain regulations 
and do everything above board — not 
under the table." 

He spoke proudly of the football 
teams fielded at Texas Western in the 
five years he has been its president. 
A member of the Border Conference, 



the little college whipped Mississippi 
Southern, 37 to 14, in the 1954 Sun 
Bowl, an annual New Year's Day clas- 
sic at El Paso. 

From El Paso came reports of an 
air of sadness blanketing Texas West- 
ern College's campus after it was 
learned that Dr. Elkins is leaving to 
become president of the University of 
Maryland. 

"We hate to lose him, but he's taking 
a big jump and Maryland won't be 
sorry," one faculty member declared. 
"He's a great guy," a student com- 
mented. 
(Se< also Qayle Talbot's M' story <>n i''i<i< 54.) 




Dr. Sinn on* 



Dr. Symons Honored 

The Beltsville Grange honored the 
University's Acting President, Thos. B. 
Symons, at its birthday celebration by 
having the State Master, Dr. Hoops, 
present, who awarded Dr. Symons the 
50-Year Member- 
ship Award by the 
National Grange. 
This was the occa- 
sion of the 65th 
birthday of the 
Beltsville Grange. 
Dr. Symons at- 
tended the State 
Bankers' Conven- 
tion meeting in 
Atlantic City, and 
attended the Agri- 
culture breakfast 
at which one of 
Maryland's 4-H boys, Mr. Matthews, 
made a very nice talk. The bankers 
have continued their great interest in 
4-H work and agricultural conserva- 
tion in the State. 

Dr. Symons addressed the Metro- 
politan Area Swimming Pool Opera- 
tors' Short School, held at the Univer- 
sity for the first time in the history 
of the organization. More than 100 
instructors from various parts of our 
Metropolitan Area were in attendance. 
"The Anne Arundel County Fair 
should capitalize on the historic sig- 
nificance of the area and people from 
miles around will be attracted to it," 
Dr. Thorns B. Symons, Acting Presi- 
dent of the University of Maryland, 
said in an address before officers and 
workers of the Fair gathered at Carvel 
Hall, Annapolis. 

"Be the center of something dis- 
tinctive, alive and interesting and the 
fair will be popular and the county 
will benefit," the speaker declared, add- 
ing, "Make people desire to see the 
fair for traditional and cultural rea- 
sons as well as for its economic sig- 
nificance. Be different from a fair 
that offers only acres of livestock. 
Plan and do something vital to the fu- 
ture of Anne Arundel County just as 
Charles County stresses the import- 
ance of tobacco. And, whatever you 
put on, put action into it. People will 
then be induced to stop, look and 
listen." 

Sandy Point Park, where the 1954 
fair will be held was termed by Dr. 
Symons as "the most wonderful fair 
site in the entire State. Until now we 
have not appreciated the opportunity 
for fairs in a park. It is an ideal set- 



up, and perfect location. A fair is a 
wonderful enterprise because it offers 
us the opportunity to observe the tri- 
umphs of our neighbors in various as- 
pects of labor." 

Presented to the gathering by toast- 
master George Sachse as "one of the 
state and Nation's outstanding authori- 
ties on agriculture," Dr. Symons said 
that one of the objectives of the fair 
should be "to proudly point out the 
county's potentialities which are so 
tremendous. Anne Arundel has a grand 
population, and a lot of people with 
tradition behind them — citizens who 
are friendly and appreciate one an- 
other. Let's advertise this wonderful 
friendly spirit at the fair. Point out 
that Anne Arundel is a leader in being 
good neighbors. Have other people 
come to see and appreciate your cul- 
ture. Do this by making your fair 
educational as well as entertaining." 



HONORS and AWARDS 

Frances A. White Receives 

Four Top Honors, John F. 

Martin, Jr. Wins Two 

High Awards. Jeanine 

F. Eberts Honored. 

Outstanding students of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland received high 
honors and awards at the annual as- 
sembly held for that purpose. 

Four major awards went to Frances 
A. White. 

Miss White received the American 
Association of University Women 
Award as the senior girl selected for 
scholarship and community leadership; 
the Alpha Lambda Delta Book Award 
as the senior of that organization with 
the highest averge for 3% years; the 
Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award in 
recognition of the practical application 
of high ideals; and the Delta Gamma 
Scholarship Award for the highest 
scholastic average received by a woman 
graduate who attended the University 
of Maryland during her entire course. 

Miss White also received one of the 
Alpha Lambda Delta Senior Awards 
recognizing an average standing of 3.5 
and, in addition, was elected to Phi 
Kappa Phi Honorary Society as a mem- 
ber of the upper tenth of the gradu- 
ating class. 

Miss White was initiated into Phi 
Kappa Phi, Honorary Society, an honor 
which had been pre- 
viously accorded to 
"L^rfta^ mother, 

1.Jt and sister. Her 

^^ father, Dr. Charles 
<*• **" K K. White, is Profes- 
^*^^p s°r °f Chemistry at 
- ^7 W the University and 
r received his bache- 
lor of science, mas- 
ter of science, and 
Ph.D. degrees at 
Maryland, and was 
i/,.w white initiated into Phi 

Kappa Phi while at 
Maryland. Her mother, the former 
Helen Rose, of Hyattsville, was grad- 



1 Maryland" 




At, DANBGGBR B"OTO 



MAY QUEEN'S COURT, 1954 



Mary Jo Turner, Arts and Sciences, Delta Delta Delta, a "Navy brat" from Virginia Beach, 
i«. leads tin annual procession after having been selected Maryland's May Itnii Queen for 
1954, the :\2)iil Annual Celeberation originated by Dean of Women Adele II. Stamp. 

Insert shows Miss Turner close m*. "«<■ of the May pole dances is shown in the lower 
illustration. 



ated from the University of Maryland 
in 1927. Her sister, Helen White Mc- 
Leish was graduated from the Univer- 
sity in 1950. Frances is a physical 
education major and will teach at Hy- 
attsville Junior High School next fall. 

Two of the highest honors for men 
went to John Francis Martin, Jr., The 
Men's Citizenship award, given to the 
senior who, during his collegiate career, 
most nearly typified the model citizen 
and has done the most for the general 
advancement of the University. This 
award is made each year by Dr. H. C. 
Byrd. Mr. Martin also was awarded the 
Men's League Cup as being the gradu- 
ating male senior who has done the 
most for the male student body. 

Sally S. Byrd Award 

The Sally Sterling Byrd Medal was 
won by Jeanine R. Eberts. This medal 
is presented bv the family of the late 
Sally Sterling Byrd of Crisfield, to that 
girl member of the Senior Class who 
best examplifies the enduring qualities 
of the pioneer women. These qualities 
should typify self dependence, courtesy, 



aggressiveness, modesty, capacity to 
achieve objectives, willingness to sacri- 
fice for others, strength of character, 
and those other qualities that enabled 
the pioneer woman to play such a 
fundamental part in the building of the 
Nation. 

Presentation of the two citizenship 
medals was made by Dr. Thomas 11. 
Symons, the University's Acting Presi- 
dent. 

Eppley Honored 

In addition to the awards presented 
to University of 
M a r y 1 a n d stu- 
dents, a surprise 
award was pre- 
sented by the 
Men's League to, 
a faculty leader, 
Col. Geary F. Ep- 
pley, Director of 
Student Welfare, 
at the Honors and 

Awards Assembly, 
Col. Eppley .. for his outstand . 

ing service and counseling to stu- 




Williams 

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dents." Presentation was made by 
Men's League president Don Gold- 
stein. 

Other awards: — 

Alpha Lambda Delta Senior Certifi- 
cate Award, to the senior members who 
have maintained the Alpha Lambda 
Delta average 3.5 to Jane Cahill, Jenni- 
fer Hank, Elizabeth A. Houghton, 
Mary Margaret Mueller, Alice Phillips, 
Virginia C. Reeves, and Mary E. 
Turner. 

James Douglas Goddard Memorial 
Medal to the resident of Prince Geor- 
ge's County, born therein, who makes 
the highest average in his studies and 
vho at the same time embodies the 
most manly attributes, to Eugene 
Michel. 

Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award, in 
recognition for the practical application 
o r high ideals, to Gerald W. Longa- 
necker, 

Sigma Chi Cup, to the man in the 
freshman class who makes the highesl 
scholastic average during the first 
semester, to Walter S. Nisslej and 
James K. Wright, Jr. 



"Maryland" 




ACTIVITIES BUILDING 

Construction on the new Ictvvities Building begins to take shape as the overhead steel girders 
go into place above the already completed concrete Denting area. 

Like adjacent Byrd stadium, entrance to the new Coliseum will be at the ground level with 
seats in n horseshoe formation. 

The building is designed for the presentation Of boxing, basketball and other indoor sports 
as well as for commencement r.i< /■<■;.*<. v, convocations and similar events. Seating capacity is 
15, 

The building leill houst training mul locker rooms for various indoor sports and will also 
accommodate the headquarters and offices of the College of Physical Education, Health and 
Recreation, of which Dr. Lester M. Fralcy is Dean. 



Pi Sigma Alpha Fred Hays Memorial 
Award, given by an alumnus to the 
senior in Government and Politics hav- 
ing the highest average in Depart- 
mental courses, to Don C. Piper. 

Delta Delta Delta Sorority Medal, to 
the sophomore girl receiving the high- 
est scholastic average during her third 
semester work at the University, to 
Esther R. Greenberg. 

Delta Delta Delta Scholarship Award 
to a woman student selected for her 
worthiness, to Valda Berzins. 

Omicron Nu Medal, to the freshman 
girl in Home Economics who attains 
the highest scholastic average during 
the first semester, to Kate W. Williams. 

Dinah Berman Memorial, to the 
sophomore who has attained the high- 
est scholastic average of his class in 
Engineering, awarded by Benjamin 
Berman, to Stanley D. Fishman. 

Crozier Award 

Bernard L. Crozier Award (Maryland 
Association of Engineers Award), a 
cash prize of $25 to the senior in Engi- 
neering who, in the opinion of the 
faculty, has made the greatest improve- 
ments in scholarship over that of his 
freshman year, to John R. Thayer. 

General Electric Company Engineer- 
ing Award, a $500 awrd to a Junior 
Engineering student for his senior year 
on the basis of scholarship and out- 
standing technical potential, to Joseph 
B. Workman. 

Bakelite Company Scholarship 
Award, a senior-tuition scholarship 
awarded to a junior engineering stu- 
dent who is worthy and capable, to 
John R. Thayer. 

Davidson Transfer and Storage Com- 
pany Scholarship, granted to a junior 
student in the College of Business and 
Public Administration majoring in 
Transportation with an interest in 



Motor Transportation, and who has 
shown scholastic ability in his preced- 
ing three years, $500.0*0, to James W. 
Boyer. 

The Maryland Motor Truck Associa- 
tion Scholarship, awarded to a junior 
student majoring in Transportation 
with an interest in Motor Transporta- 
tion, and who has shown in his pre- 
vious years of scholastic endeavor, his 
apparent ability to succeed, $500.00, to 
Henry R. Passi. 

Delta Gamma Scholarship Award, for 
the highest scholastic average received 
by a woman member of the graduating 
class who has attended the University 
for her entire course, to Frances A. 
White. 

Women's National Airport Club 
Award, to the outstanding student in 
Transportation, $100.00, to James W. 
Boyer. 

Drama Honors 

The Charles B. Hale Dramatic 
Awards, by which the University Thea- 
ter recognizes annually the man and 
woman members of the senior class 
who have done most for the advance- 
ment of dramatics at the University, 
to Jane Cahill and William Price. 

B'nai B'rith Women of Prince 
George's County Book Award, for ex- 
cellence in Hebrew studies, to Ronnie 
Levin, Grace Rabinowitz, Marlene San- 
dler and Lois B. Sugarman. 

Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key, to 
a member of the graduating class who 
has maintained the highest scholastic 
average for the entire four-year course 
in the College of Business and Public 
Administration, to Simon Atlas. 

Alpha Zeta Award, to the agricul- 
tural student in the freshman class who 
attains the highest average record in 
academic work, to Benjamin F. Good. 

Washington Panhellenic Association 



Award, to a woman student, a member 
of a National Panhellenic Conference 
Sorority who has done most to promote 
good social relations among the sorori- 
ties on the campus, $200.00, to Alice 
Maude Johnson. 

Grange Award, to the senior who 
has excelled to leadership and scho- 
lastic attainment and has contributed 
meritorious service to the College of 
-Agriculture, to Earl B. Miller. 

Pi Delta Epsilon Award, to the 
freshman contributing most to Univer- 
sity publications, to Roger Keith; to 
the senior contributing most to Univer- 
sity publications, to James Hansen, Jr. 

Sigma Alpha Omicron Award, to the 
senior student majoring in Bacteriology 
for scholarship, character and leader- 
ship, to David A. Power. 

Borden Agricultural Scholarship, to 
Neri A. Clark. 

Sears, Roebuck Foundation Advanced 
Scholarship Award, to James C. Smith. 

Danforth Award 

Danforth Foundation Summer Schol- 
arship, to an outstanding Home Eco- 
nomics freshman, to Dorothy Karlsson. 

Danforth Foundation Summer Schol- 
arship, to an outstanding Home Eco- 
nomics junior, to Jean Martim. 

Borden Home Economics Scholarship, 
to the Senior Home Economics student 
with the highest scholastic rank, to 
Alice Phillips. 

Home Economics Alumni Award, to 
the student outstanding in application 
of Home Economics in her present liv- 
ing and who shows promise of carrying 
these into her future home and com- 
munity, to Betty Woodward. 

The Education Alumni Award, to the 
outstanding senior man and senior wo- 
man in the College of Education, to 
John Yesulaitis and Eileen Reinhart. 
Publications — Keys For Service 

"M" BOOK— Judy Antrim, Barbara 
Ann Bennett, Loretta J. Bickford, Ron- 
ald J. Brooks, Morris M. Lebowitz, 
Jeanne C. Peake, and Alice M. Scott. 

OLD LINE-^Iudy Antrim, Brian H. 
Bailey, George J. Barthol, Barbara Ann 
Bennett, Jane P. Cahill, Barbara A. 
Dean, Stan L. Harrison, Michal D. 
Potash, and Jean E. Spencer. 

TERRAPIN— Jeanne R. Eberts, Vir- 
ginia R. Gough, Stuart E. Jones, Caro- 
line Kricker, John F. Martin, Maxine 
V. Moffett, Beth Mouser, Audrey P. 
Nicoloudis, Edward J. Speer, Mary E. 
Stevens, and Charles E. Wickard 

DIAMONDBACK— Robert Baechtold, 
Donald Betz, Edith Brill, Harvey Cas- 
barian, Adele Chidakel, Barbara' Dodd, 
Neal Durgin, James P. Garritty, Robert 
Giffen, Mike Giocanada, and Edward 
Niner. 

Band Awards 

Gold Cups presented to persons who 
have faithfully served four years in the 
Band — William Dusman, Henry Ger- 
hart, Richard Gorey, Lois Harvey, Mel- 
vin Huyett, Betty Woodard, and Wil- 
liam Timmons. 

Gold Keys awarded to persons who 
have faithfully served three years in 
the Band — Ann Evans, Robert Giffen, 
Bernadette McKcldin, Edward Martin, 
Theodore Mercer, Edward O'Toole, Wil- 
liam Stokes, Barbara Taylor, and Rich- 
ard Waters. 



8 



"Maryland" 




NEW DORMITORY 



STUDENT UNION LORRY 



lows progress in construction of Montgomery Hall, one of tin three new dormitories for won each consisting of 10 

for soil student*. Three new dormitories for women, consisting of '.) typical units and designed to house 47*3 



Left .—The illustration sh( 

typical units, with capacity 
Students ore also near completion. 

"Homed for Maryland counties, the men's dormitories will he known as Montgomery, Charles and Allegany Halls, while the women's dormi- 
tories will be designated an Caroline, Wicomico and Carroll IlaTls. 

Bight: — Lobby of the new student union building, nearly completed. 

The, building is designed for social and recreational activities and relaxation and Kill house meeting rooms, student government office^, 
snack bar, etc. 



Military Awards 

Governor's Cup for the best drilled 
Squadron, to "G" Squadron; Cadet 
Captain Ronald J. Rrooks. 

Alumni Cup for the best drilled 
Flight, to the Flight Leader of Third 
Flight of "R" Squadron; Cadet 1st Lt. 
Charles T. Weller. 

Air Force Association Ribbons for 
the best drilled Squad, to the members 
of the First Squad, Third Flight of 
"G" Squadron; Basic Cadet R. Bourne 
Squad Leader, Basic Cadet J. Saylor, 
Basic Cadet R. Ford, Basic Cadet W. 
Welton, Basic Cadet J. Cadden, Basic 
Cadet M. Darwin, Basic Cadet R. Cooke. 

Sun Newspaper Award for the best 
drilled Basic Cadet, to Basic Cadet Gil- 
bert M. Fleisher of "N" Squadron. 

William Randolph Hearst Medal for 
second place in National Small Bore 
Competition — Cadet Lt. Col. R. E. 
Gorey, Cadet 1st Lt. R. Martorana, 
Cadet E. Barton, Cadet L. Savage, Ca- 
det L. Lomolino. 

Legion Honors 

American Legion Award for out- 
standing leadership contribution to 
Corps of Cadets, to Cadet Col. Delmar 
B. Spivey, Air Division Commander. 

Armed Forces Communication Award 
for outstanding achievement in the field 
of electronics, to Cadet 1st Lt. Waynt 
A. DeMoss, Operations Officer, "A" 
Squadron. 

Reserve Officers Association Medals 
for academic achievement in AFROTC. 
Gold Medal presented to Cadet Captain 
Simon Atlas, Commander "P" Squad- 
ron. Silver Medal presented to Cadet 
2nd Lt. Don C. Piper, Flight Leader, 
2nd Flight, "D" Squadron. Bronze Med- 
al presented to Cadet Captain A. J. 
Kuprenas, Executive Officer, First 
Group. 

Glenn L. Martin, Aeronautical Engi- 
neering Award for academic excellence 
in Aeronautical Engineering and ap- 



plied for Flight Training, to 1st Lt. 
James E. Burkett, Flight Leader, Third 
Flight, "J" Squadron. 

Disabled American Veterans Gold 
Cup for outstanding leadership and 
scholarship, to Cadet Lt. Col. Royal T. 
Squires, Commander, 2nd Wing. 

Air Force Association Silver Medal 
for scholastic grades, individual char- 
acteristics, performance at summer 
camp, to Cadet 1st Lt. Robert L. For- 
ward, Flight Leader, 2nd Flight, "M" 
Squadron. 

Scabbard and Blade Coblenz Memorial 
Cup for advancing interests in AF- 
ROTC through Scabbard and Blade, 
to Cadet Captain Richard M. Jansson, 
Squadron "F." 

Arnold Air Society Cup for the most 
proficient cadet in the Junior Advanced 
Leadership Program, to Cadet Melvin 
S. Gray. 

Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corpo- 
ration Award for the Sophomore cadet 
displaying outstanding leadership, to 
Cadet Leland G. Fay. 

Maryland State Society Daughters of 
Founders and Patriots of America 
Award for Freshman Cadet attaining 
highest overall academic grade, to Ca- 
det David A. Berman. 

Hamill Memorial Plaque for sopho- 
more cadet excelling in leadership and 
scholarship, to Cadet Charles 0. John- 
son. 

Athletic Awards 

Top honors on various University of 
Mai-yland athletic teams were as fol- 
lows: — 

The Louis W. Berger Trophy for the 
outstanding senior baseball player went 
to Edward Miller. 

The Edwin E. Powell Trophy to the 
player who has rendered the greatest 
service to lacrosse during the year went 
to George T. Corrigan. 



The William P. Cole, III, Memorial 
Lacrosse Award offered by teammates 
and coaches to the outstanding Uni- 
versity of Maryland Midfield was pre- 
sented to Philip W. Green. 

The Dixie Walker Memorial Trophy 
given by Theta Chi Fraternity in mem- 
ory of Dixie Walker, to the boxer who 
shows the most improvement over the 
preceding year, went to Leo Coyne. 

The Tom Birmingham Memorial 
Trophy, to the outstanding member of 
the boxing team, awarded by Benny 
and Hotsy Alperstein, in memory of 
Tom Birmingham '37, was presented to 
Gary Garber. 

Track Award 

The Halbert K. Evans Memorial 
Track Award, given in memory of 
Hermie Evans, Class 1940, by his 
friends to the outstanding graduating 
senior trackman, was awarded to Clar- 
ence Gaddy. 

The Anthony C. Nardo Memorial 
Trophy for the best football lineman 
of the year went to Stanley Jones. 

The Teke Trophy offered by the 
Maryland Chapter of Tau Kappa Ep- 
silon Fraternity to the student who 
during his four years at the Univer- 
sity has rendered the greatest service 
to football, went to Bernard Faloney. 

The Charles Leroy Mackert Trophy, 
offered by William E. Krouse to the 
Maryland student who has contributed 
most to wrestling was awarded to 
Robert Fischer. 

The Maryland Ring, offered in mem- 
ory of Charles L. Linhardt to the Mary- 
land man who is adjudged the best ath- 
lete of the year was awarded to Ernest 
Fischer. 

The Silvester Watch for Excellence 
in Athletics, to the man who typified 

(Concluded on Page 47) 



'Maryland'' 



What Of The Future? 

An Open Letter To The Seniors Graduating 
From College This Year, 




From The 

Jlo*t. flame* P. Mitchell 

Secretary of Labor 

Speaking as your Secretary of Labor, 
I want to tell you not to be afraid 
of the future. America is still the 
Nation your ancestors made it. It 
still holds the greatest opportunities of 
any nation of the world, opportunities 
indeed which would be more than 
enough for twice your number. 

Do not believe the John Dooms who 
will tell you that we are in for a de- 
pression. Let me re- 
mind you that in 
March, 1950, 6.7 per- 
cent of the labor 
force was unem- 
ployed. In March, 
1954, it was 5.8 per- 
cent. 

1953 was an ab- 
normally high year. 
Levels of produc- 
tion and employ- 
ment could not help 
Secretary Mitchell ^ cQme doym frQm 

the 1953 boom figures. 

High Figure 

Manufacturing in March employed 
some 16,000,000 people, the highest 
March figure in recent years except 
for 1953. 

Wholesale and retail trade is at an 
all-time high with well over 10,000,000 
employees. Here is a rapidly expanding 
field which will greatly need your ser- 
vices as salesmen and advertisers. 

The number of people on the pay- 
rolls of business establishments and 
Government was 47,300,000 in March, 
higher than any other March on record 
except 1953. 

The gross national product — the 
total output of all goods and services 
in our economy — during the first quar- 
ter of this year was at an annual rate 
of $359,000,000,000. This is about 
$12,000,000,000 less annually than the 
peak last year, but it is far above 
any earlier year on record, even after 
allowing for price increases. 

Construction High 

Contract construction employment is 
at an all-time high for this time of 
year as are Government employment 
and general services. 

The military service, which many of 
you face, should not be regarded as 
a waste of time. There are many 
skills and techniques which you can 
learn through experience in the mili- 
tary which will stand you in good 
stead all the rest of your life. Look 
on your military service as a great 
opportunity for further education, and 
regard it as an important part of your 
career. 

With regard to the fears that some 
of you have that you will be but a 
nameless cipher in the new world you 

10 



are about to enter, that you will lose 
your precious identity as an individual, 
let me just reassure you that in 
America, a working person is no 
machine, no automaton. You are a 
child of the Creator, and the greatest 
responsibility that you have is to be 
worthy of yourself. 

Do you remember all the talk in 
the not distant past about the "com- 
mon man?" The idea that man was, 
or somehow could be made, the product 
of a biological punch press that would 
turn out a common mould was as 
reactionary a philosophy as has ever 
been heard in this country. We are 
all, every single one of us in every 
city, or town or crossroads, uncommon 
men. 

I haye had an analysis made which 
will show you where you are most 
needed in our economy and where your 
opportunities are best. I give it to 
you with congratulations, sincere best 
wishes and the hope that in some 
small way it helps you to fulfill the 
destiny that God has for you. 

Engineering 

Opportunities in engineering are 
good for both new graduates and ex- 
perienced men and women. During 
the build-up stage of the defense pro- 
gram the demand for engineers rose 
spectacularly. Continuation of the de- 
fense program and a high level of 
general business activity will mean 
continuing large demand for engi- 
neering personnel over the next few 
years. In the face of this continued 
demand, the number of new engineer- 
ing graduates has been declining since 
the 1950 peak of 52,000, and will con- 
tinue to drop, reaching a low of about 
19,000 this year. Graduations are ex- 
pected to rise again to about 22,000 
in 1955, 30,000 in 1956 and 35,000 in 
1957 (assuming continuation of present 
Selective Service student deferment 
policies). However, many of the new 
graduates of the next few years will 
enter the Armed Forces upon gradua- 
tion. Therefore, there should be good 
employment opportunities for engi- 
neers for a number of years. 

Chemical, electrical, and mechanical 
engineers will continue to find employ- 
ment mainly in manufacturing indus- 
tries, while Federal, State, and local 
governments will employ the largest 
number of civil engineers. 

Median annual incomes for engineers 
in private industry in 1953, according 
to a recently released survey by the 
Engineers Joint Council were as fol- 
lows: 1 year of experience, $4,284; 
5 years, $5,382; 9-13 years, $6,593; 
19-23 years, $8,043; and 29-33 years, 
$9,158. 

Natural Sciences 

Demand for personnel is high in most 
of the natural sciences, especially in 
activities related to defense production 



only 45,000. This supply of new teach- 
and research and development. Person- 
nel are also needed in other kinds of 
scientific work such as administration 
and technical sales. Though the need 
is greatest for persons with graduate 
training, those w